Waverley (Morgantown, Maryland)

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Waverley
Waverly Wayside MD HABS1.jpg
Waverly in 1934
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Location13535 Waverly Point Road, near Morgantown, Maryland
Coordinates 38°20′19″N76°57′36″W / 38.33861°N 76.96000°W / 38.33861; -76.96000 Coordinates: 38°20′19″N76°57′36″W / 38.33861°N 76.96000°W / 38.33861; -76.96000
Area136 acres (55 ha)
Built1774 (1774)
Architectural styleFederal
NRHP reference # 75000886 [1]
Added to NRHPAugust 11, 1975

Waverley is a historic home located near Morgantown, Charles County, Maryland. It is a large two story, five-bay, Flemish-bond brick house, that faces the Potomac River. All interior woodwork is characteristic of the Federal period. [2]

Morgantown, Maryland Unincorporated community in Maryland, United States

Morgantown is an unincorporated community in Charles County, Maryland. It lies south of the Governor Harry W. Nice Memorial Bridge on the Potomac River at Lower Cedar Point. It is known for the Mirant Morgantown Generating Station smokestacks. The community had ferryboat service to Potomac Beach in Virginia before the present bridge opened in 1940. Waverley was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975. In 2007, a controversial coal barge loading facility was under construction at the power plant on Popes Creek.

Charles County, Maryland County in the United States

Charles County is a county located in the southern central portion of the U.S. state of Maryland. As of the 2010 census, the population was 146,551. The county seat is La Plata. The county was named for Charles Calvert (1637–1715), third Baron Baltimore.

Maryland State of the United States of America

Maryland is a state in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States, bordering Virginia, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia to its south and west; Pennsylvania to its north; and Delaware to its east. The state's largest city is Baltimore, and its capital is Annapolis. Among its occasional nicknames are Old Line State, the Free State, and the Chesapeake Bay State. It is named after the English queen Henrietta Maria, known in England as Queen Mary.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. J. Richard Rivoire (January 1975). "National Register of Historic Places Registration: Waverley" (PDF). Maryland Historical Trust. Retrieved 2016-01-01.
Maryland Historical Trust state-level agency responsible for historic preservation in Maryland, United States

The Maryland Historical Trust is an agency of Maryland Department of Planning and serves as the Maryland State Historic Preservation Office. The agency serves to assist in research, conservation, and education,of Maryland's historical and cultural heritage.