1901 Northern Maori by-election

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The 1901 Northern Maori by-election was a by-election for the seat of Northern Maori during the 14th New Zealand Parliament. The election was held on 9 January 1901.

By-elections, also spelled bye-elections, are used to fill elected offices that have become vacant between general elections.

Northern Maori was one of the four original New Zealand parliamentary Māori electorates, from 1868 to 1996.

14th New Zealand Parliament

The 14th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand Parliament. It was elected at the 1899 general election in December of that year.

The sitting member Hone Heke Ngapua was declared bankrupt and had to resign from the seat.

Hone Heke Ngapua New Zealand politician

Hone Heke Ngapuha was a Māori and Liberal Party Member of Parliament in New Zealand. He was born in Kaikohe, and was named after his great-uncle Hōne Heke. Ngapua is best remembered for his advocacy for Te Kotahitanga, sponsorship of Māori autonomy in Parliament through a Native Rights Bill, and his successful intervention in the Dog Tax War of 1898.

However following the precedent of Sir Joseph Ward in 1897 (see1897 Awarua by-election) he was eligible to stand in the resulting by-election.

Joseph Ward New Zealand politician

Sir Joseph George Ward of Wellington, 1st Baronet, was a New Zealand politician who served as the 17th Prime Minister of New Zealand from 1906 to 1912 and from 1928 to 1930. He was a dominant figure in the Liberal and United ministries of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

1897 Awarua by-election New Zealand by-election

A by-election was held for the Awarua electorate on 5 August 1897, for the seat vacated by Joseph Ward, which he had held since 1887. Despite having had to resign due to bankruptcy, he exploited a legal loophole and was re-elected to the 13th New Zealand Parliament.

He won the by-election with a substantial majority.

Eparaima Te Mutu Kapa had won the seat in the 1891 by-election, but had been defeated in the 1896 election and 1899 election.

Eparaima Te Mutu Kapa was a 19th-century Māori member of the New Zealand parliament.

The 1891 Northern Maori by-election was a by-election during the 11th New Zealand Parliament. The election was held on 7 February 1891.

1896 New Zealand general election

The New Zealand general election of 1896 was held on Wednesday, 4 December in the general electorates, and on Thursday, 19 December in the Māori electorates to elect a total of 74 MPs to the 13th session of the New Zealand Parliament. A total number of 337,024 (76.1%) voters turned out to vote.

Results

The following table gives the election results:

1901 Northern Maori by-election [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±
Liberal Hone Heke Ngapua 1751 71.41
Independent Riapo Puhipi41616.97
Independent Eparaima Te Mutu Kapa 28511.62
Independent Hapeta Henare973.96
Independent Kiri Pararea943.83
Independent Pouaka Parore763.10
Turnout 2452
Majority133554.45

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References

  1. "Northern Maori Election". Auckland Star . 19 January 1901.