2002 WNBA season

Last updated
2002 WNBA season
League Women's National Basketball Association
Sport Basketball
DurationMay 25 - August 31
Number of games32
Number of teams16
Total attendance2,362,412
Average attendance9,228
TV partner(s) ESPN, NBC, Oxygen
2002 WNBA Draft
Top draft pick Flag of the United States.svg Sue Bird
Picked by Seattle Storm
Regular season
Season MVP Flag of the United States.svg Sheryl Swoopes (Houston)
Playoffs
Eastern champions New York Liberty
  Eastern runners-up Washington Mystics
Western champions Los Angeles Sparks
  Western runners-up Utah Starzz
Finals
Champions Los Angeles Sparks
  Runners-up New York Liberty
Finals MVP Flag of the United States.svg Lisa Leslie (Los Angeles)
WNBA seasons

The 2002 WNBA Season was the Women's National Basketball Association's sixth season. The season ended with the Los Angeles Sparks winning their second WNBA championship.

Contents

Regular season standings

Eastern Conference

Eastern Conference WLPCTConf.GB
New York Liberty x1814.56311–10
Charlotte Sting x1814.56312–9
Washington Mystics x1715.53112–91.0
Indiana Fever x1616.50012–92.0
Orlando Miracle o1616.50013–82.0
Miami Sol o1517.46911–103.0
Cleveland Rockers o1022.3127–148.0
Detroit Shock o923.2816–159.0

Western Conference

Western Conference WLPCTConf.GB
Los Angeles Sparks x257.78117–4
Houston Comets x248.75016–51.0
Utah Starzz x2012.62512–95.0
Seattle Storm x1715.53110–118.0
Portland Fire o1616.5008–139.0
Sacramento Monarchs o1418.4388–1311.0
Phoenix Mercury o1121.3447–1414.0
Minnesota Lynx o1022.3136–1515.0

Season award winners

AwardWinnerTeam
WNBA Finals MVP Award Lisa Leslie Los Angeles Sparks
WNBA Most Valuable Player Award Sheryl Swoopes Houston Comets
WNBA Defensive Player of the Year Award Sheryl Swoopes Houston Comets
WNBA Most Improved Player Award Coco Miller Washington Mystics
WNBA Peak Performer Chamique Holdsclaw Washington Mystics
WNBA Peak Performer Chamique Holdsclaw Washington Mystics
WNBA Rookie of the Year Award Tamika Catchings Indiana Fever
Kim Perrot Sportsmanship Award Jennifer Gillom Phoenix Mercury
WNBA Coach of the Year Award Marianne Stanley Washington Mystics

Playoffs

First Round
Best of 3
Conference Finals
Best of 3
WNBA Finals
Best of 3
         
E1 New York 2
E4 Indiana 1
E1 New York 2
Eastern Conference
E3 Washington 1
E2 Charlotte 0
E3 Washington 2
E1 New York 0
W1 Los Angeles 2
W1 Los Angeles 2
W4 Seattle 0
W1 Los Angeles 2
Western Conference
W3 Utah 0
W2 Houston 1
W3 Utah 2

Coaches

Eastern Conference

Western Conference

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