2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification – UEFA Group 2

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UEFA Group 2 of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification competition consisted of five teams: Switzerland, Scotland, Poland, Belarus, and Albania (which advanced from the preliminary round). The composition of the seven groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 25 April 2017, [1] [2] with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking. [3]

The European qualifying competition for the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup was a women's football competition that determined the eight UEFA teams joining the automatically qualified hosts France in the final tournament.

The Switzerland women's national football team represents Switzerland in international women's football. The team played its first match in 1972.

The Scotland women's national football team represents Scotland in international women's football competitions. Since 1998, the team has been governed by the Scottish Football Association (SFA). Scotland qualified in the FIFA Women's World Cup for the first time in 2019, and qualified for their first UEFA Women's Euro in 2017. As of December 2018, the team was 20th in the FIFA Women's World Rankings.

Contents

The group was played in home-and-away round-robin format between 15 September 2017 and 4 September 2018. The group winners qualified for the final tournament, while the runners-up advanced to the play-offs if they were one of the four best runners-up among all seven groups (not counting results against the fifth-placed team). [4]

The UEFA play-offs of the 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification competition involve the four runners-up with the best records among all seven groups in the qualifying group stage.

Standings

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualificationFlag of Scotland.svgFlag of Switzerland.svgFlag of Poland.svgFlag of Albania.svgFlag of Belarus.svg
1Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 8701197+1221 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup 2–1 3–0 5–0 2–1
2Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 8611215+1619 Play-offs 1–0 2–1 5–1 3–0
3Flag of Poland.svg  Poland 83231612+411 2–3 0–0 1–1 4–1
4Flag of Albania.svg  Albania 8116622164 1–2 1–4 1–4 1–0
5Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus 8107521163 1–2 0–5 1–4 1–0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Qualification tiebreakers

Matches

Times are CET/CEST, [note 1] as listed by UEFA (local times, if different, are in parentheses).

Central European Time standard time (UTC+01:00)

Central European Time (CET), used in most parts of Europe and a few North African countries, is a standard time which is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). The time offset from UTC can be written as UTC+01:00. The same standard time, UTC+01:00, is also known as Middle European Time and under other names like Berlin Time, Warsaw Time and Romance Standard Time (RST), Paris Time or Rome Time.

Central European Summer Time daylight savings time in the central european time zone

Central European Summer Time (CEST), sometime referred also as Central European Daylight Time (CEDT), is the standard clock time observed during the period of summer daylight-saving in those European countries which observe Central European Time (UTC+01:00) during the other part of the year. It corresponds to UTC+02:00, which makes it the same as Central Africa Time, South African Standard Time and Kaliningrad Time in Russia.

Albania  Flag of Albania.svg1–4Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
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Jana Brunner is a Swiss footballer who plays for Basel and the Switzerland national team.

Ramona Bachmann Swiss footballer

Ramona Bachmann is a Swiss footballer who plays as a forward for the Switzerland women's national football team and Chelsea of the English FA WSL. Bachmann, who is from Malters, moved to Sweden aged 16 and played for Umeå IK for four seasons from 2007 until 2011. She spent the 2010 season playing in the United States for Women's Professional Soccer (WPS) club Atlanta Beat. Ahead of the 2012 season she left Umeå and signed a contract with LdB FC Malmö. She went to German Allianz Frauen-Bundesliga club VfL Wolfsburg in the summer of 2015.

Ana-Maria Crnogorčević Swiss footballer

Ana-Maria Crnogorčević is a Swiss footballer. She plays as a striker for Portland Thorns FC in the NWSL and represents the Switzerland women's national football team. A fast player with good heading ability, Crnogorčević is considered alongside Ramona Bachmann one of Switzerland's most talented female footballers.

Elbasan Arena, Elbasan
Attendance: 200
Referee: Amy Rayner (England)
Poland  Flag of Poland.svg4–1Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus
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Stadion Górnika Łęczna, Łęczna
Attendance: 3,740
Referee: Tanja Subotič (Slovenia)

Belarus  Flag of Belarus.svg1–0Flag of Albania.svg  Albania
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FC Minsk Stadium, Minsk
Attendance: 350
Referee: Paula Brady (Republic of Ireland)
Switzerland   Flag of Switzerland.svg2–1Flag of Poland.svg  Poland
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Tissot Arena, Biel/Bienne
Attendance: 811
Referee: Eleni Antoniou (Greece)

Belarus  Flag of Belarus.svg1–2Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland
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FC Minsk Stadium, Minsk
Attendance: 420
Referee: Nelli Stepanyan (Armenia)

Scotland  Flag of Scotland.svg5–0Flag of Albania.svg  Albania
Fiona Brown (footballer) association football player

Fiona Brown is a Scottish footballer who plays as a forward for FC Rosengård in the Damallsvenskan and the Scotland national team.

Jane Ross (footballer) Footballer

Jane Ross is a Scottish footballer who plays as a striker for West Ham United in the FA WSL and the Scotland national team.

Claire Emslie is a Scottish footballer who plays as a forward for Manchester City and the Scotland national team.

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St Mirren Park, Paisley
Attendance: 1,845
Referee: Dimitrina Milkova (Bulgaria)

Albania  Flag of Albania.svg1–4Flag of Poland.svg  Poland
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Loro Boriçi Stadium, Shkodër
Attendance: 800
Referee: Iuliana Demetrescu (Romania)
Switzerland   Flag of Switzerland.svg3–0Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus
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LIPO Park, Schaffhausen
Attendance: 2,017
Referee: Cheryl Foster (Wales)

Switzerland   Flag of Switzerland.svg5–1Flag of Albania.svg  Albania

Florijana Ismaili is a Swiss football forward, playing for BSC YB Frauen of Switzerland's Nationalliga A. Since her debut in January 2014, a 2–1 win over Portugal, she has been a member of the Switzerland women's national football team.

Rahel Kiwic Swiss footballer

Rahel Marianne Kiwic is a Swiss football defender currently playing for Turbine Potsdam. In March 2012 she made her debut for the Swiss national team in the 2012 Cyprus Women's Cup. As a junior international she took part in the 2010 U-20 World Cup.

Viola Calligaris is a Swiss footballer who plays as a midfielder for Atlético Madrid in the Spanish Primera División.

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Tissot Arena, Biel/Bienne
Attendance: 1,215
Referee: Petra Pavlikova (Slovakia)

Switzerland   Flag of Switzerland.svg1–0Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland
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LIPO Park, Schaffhausen
Attendance: 2,504
Referee: Olga Zadinová (Czech Republic)
Poland  Flag of Poland.svg1–1Flag of Albania.svg  Albania
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Osrodek Sportu i Rekreacji, Włocławek
Attendance: 1,925
Referee: María Dolores Martinez Madrona (Spain)

Albania  Flag of Albania.svg1–0Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus
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Elbasan Arena, Elbasan
Attendance: 700
Referee: Ifeoma Kulmala (Finland)
Scotland  Flag of Scotland.svg3–0Flag of Poland.svg  Poland
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St Mirren Park, Paisley
Attendance: 2,121
Referee: Riem Hussein (Germany)

Scotland  Flag of Scotland.svg2–1Flag of Belarus.svg  Belarus
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Falkirk Stadium, Falkirk
Attendance: 2,007
Referee: Lois Otte (Belgium)

Poland  Flag of Poland.svg2–3Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland
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Belarus  Flag of Belarus.svg0–5Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
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FC Minsk Stadium, Minsk
Attendance: 300
Referee: Viola Raudziņa (Latvia)

Scotland  Flag of Scotland.svg2–1Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
Report
St Mirren Park, Paisley
Attendance: 4,098
Referee: Sara Persson (Sweden)
Belarus  Flag of Belarus.svg1–4Flag of Poland.svg  Poland
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Traktor Stadium, Minsk
Attendance: 250
Referee: Ainara Andrea Acevedo Dudley (Spain)

Poland  Flag of Poland.svg0–0Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
Report
Stadion Stali Mielec, Mielec
Attendance: 5,128
Referee: Ivana Martinčić (Croatia)
Albania  Flag of Albania.svg1–2Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland
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Loro Boriçi Stadium, Shkodër
Attendance: 700
Referee: Barbara Poxhofer (Austria)

Goalscorers

There were 67 goals scored in 20 matches, for an average of 3.35 goals per match.

6 goals

5 goals

4 goals

3 goals

2 goals

1 goal

1 own goal

Notes

  1. CEST (UTC+2) for dates between 26 March and 28 October 2017 and between 25 March and 27 October 2018, and CET (UTC+1) for all other dates.

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References