2021 UEFA European Under-21 Championship qualification Group 2

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Group 2 of the 2021 UEFA European Under-21 Championship qualifying competition consists of six teams: France, Slovakia, Switzerland, Georgia, Azerbaijan, and Liechtenstein. The composition of the nine groups in the qualifying group stage was decided by the draw held on 11 December 2018, 09:00 CET (UTC+1), at the UEFA headquarters in Nyon, Switzerland, [1] with the teams seeded according to their coefficient ranking.

Contents

The group was originally scheduled to be played in home-and-away round-robin format between 6 June 2019 and 13 October 2020. Under the original format, the group winners and the best runners-up among all nine groups (not counting results against the sixth-placed team) would qualify directly for the final tournament, while the remaining eight runners-up would advance to the play-offs. [2]

On 17 March 2020, all matches were put on hold due to the COVID-19 pandemic. [3] On 17 June 2020, UEFA announced that the qualifying group stage would be extended and end on 17 November 2020, while the play-offs, originally scheduled to be played in November 2020, would be cancelled. Instead, the group winners and the five best runners-up among all nine groups (not counting results against the sixth-placed team) would qualify for the final tournament. [4] [5] [6]

Standings

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPtsQualificationFlag of France.svgFlag of Switzerland.svgFlag of Georgia.svgFlag of Slovakia.svgFlag of Azerbaijan.svgFlag of Liechtenstein.svg
1Flag of France.svg  France 109013210+2227 Final tournament 3–1 3–2 1–0 5–0 5–0
2Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland 10901268+1827 3–1 2–1 4–1 2–1 3–0
3Flag of Georgia.svg  Georgia 105051714+315 0–2 0–3 2–1 1–0 4–0
4Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia 104062221+112 3–5 1–2 3–2 2–1 6–0
5Flag of Azerbaijan.svg  Azerbaijan 10208618126 1–2 0–1 0–3 2–1 1–0
6Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein 10109335323 0–5 0–5 0–2 2–4 1–0
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers

Matches

Times are CET/CEST, [note 1] as listed by UEFA (local times, if different, are in parentheses).

Liechtenstein  Flag of Liechtenstein.svg1–0Flag of Azerbaijan.svg  Azerbaijan
Report
Sportpark Eschen-Mauren, Eschen
Attendance: 323
Referee: Tim Marshall (Northern Ireland)

Georgia  Flag of Georgia.svg4–0Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein
Report
Tengiz Burjanadze Stadium, Gori
Attendance: 2,000
Referee: Alex Troleis (Faroe Islands)

Azerbaijan  Flag of Azerbaijan.svg2–1Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia
Report
Dalga Arena, Baku
Attendance: 274
Referee: Dejan Jakimovski (North Macedonia)

Liechtenstein  Flag of Liechtenstein.svg0–5Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
Report
Rheinpark Stadion, Vaduz
Attendance: 774
Referee: Paul McLaughlin (Republic of Ireland)
Azerbaijan  Flag of Azerbaijan.svg0–3Flag of Georgia.svg  Georgia
Report
Dalga Arena, Baku
Attendance: 357
Referee: Laurent Kopriwa (Luxembourg)

Liechtenstein  Flag of Liechtenstein.svg2–4Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia
Report
Sportpark Eschen-Mauren, Eschen
Attendance: 275
Referee: Vilhjálmur Thórarinsson (Iceland)

France  Flag of France.svg5–0Flag of Azerbaijan.svg  Azerbaijan
Report
Stade de l'Épopée, Calais
Attendance: 8,912
Referee: António Nobre (Portugal)

Switzerland   Flag of Switzerland.svg2–1Flag of Georgia.svg  Georgia
Report
Stadion Schützenwiese, Winterthur
Attendance: 650
Referee: Trustin Farrugia Cann (Malta)

Azerbaijan  Flag of Azerbaijan.svg0–1Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
Report
Kapital Bank Arena, Sumqayit
Attendance: 1,517
Referee: Novak Simović (Serbia)
Slovakia  Flag of Slovakia.svg3–5Flag of France.svg  France
Report
MOL Aréna, Dunajská Streda
Attendance: 2,603
Referee: Donald Robertson (Scotland)

Azerbaijan  Flag of Azerbaijan.svg1–0Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein
Report
Kapital Bank Arena, Sumqayit
Attendance: 715
Referee: Loukas Soteriou (Cyprus)

France  Flag of France.svg3–2Flag of Georgia.svg  Georgia
Report
Stade Marcel Picot, Tomblaine
Attendance: 11,798
Referee: Christopher Jaeger (Austria)

Slovakia  Flag of Slovakia.svg3–2Flag of Georgia.svg  Georgia
Report
Štadión pod Zoborom, Nitra
Attendance: 1548
Referee: Eldorjan Hamiti (Albania)

Switzerland   Flag of Switzerland.svg3–1Flag of France.svg  France
Report

Georgia  Flag of Georgia.svg0–2Flag of France.svg  France
Report
Tengiz Burjanadze Stadium, Gori
Attendance: 0 [note 2]
Referee: Duje Strukan (Croatia)
Switzerland   Flag of Switzerland.svg4–1Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia
Report
LIPO Park Schaffhausen, Schaffhausen
Attendance: 0 [note 2]
Referee: Mads Kristoffersen (Denmark)

Azerbaijan  Flag of Azerbaijan.svg1–2Flag of France.svg  France
Report
Kapital Bank Arena, Sumqayit
Attendance: 0 [note 2]
Referee: Halis Özkahya (Turkey)

Liechtenstein  Flag of Liechtenstein.svg0–2Flag of Georgia.svg  Georgia
Report
Sportpark Eschen-Mauren, Eschen
Attendance: 0 [note 2]
Referee: Dragomir Draganov (Bulgaria)
Slovakia  Flag of Slovakia.svg1–2Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
Report
Štadión pod Zoborom, Nitra
Attendance: 0 [note 2]
Referee: Keith Kennedy (Northern Ireland)

Slovakia  Flag of Slovakia.svg2–1Flag of Azerbaijan.svg  Azerbaijan
Report
Štadión pod Zoborom, Nitra
Attendance: 0
Referee: Kristoffer Hagenes (Norway)
France  Flag of France.svg5–0Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein
Report
Stade de la Meinau, Strasbourg
Attendance: 1321
Referee: Ian McNabb (Northern Ireland)

Georgia  Flag of Georgia.svg0–3Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
Report
Tengiz Burjanadze Stadium, Gori
Attendance: 0
Referee: Jonathan Lardot (Belgium)

France  Flag of France.svg1–0Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia
Report
Stade de la Meinau, Strasbourg
Attendance: 2287
Referee: Miloš Djordjic (Serbia)

Georgia  Flag of Georgia.svg1–0Flag of Azerbaijan.svg  Azerbaijan
Report
Tengiz Burjanadze Stadium, Gori
Attendance: 0
Referee: Dzmitry Dzmitryieu (Belarus)
Switzerland   Flag of Switzerland.svg3–0Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein
Report
Tissot Arena, Biel/Bienne
Attendance: 532
Referee: Daniyar Sakhi (Kazakhstan)

Georgia  Flag of Georgia.svg2–1Flag of Slovakia.svg  Slovakia
Report
Mikheil Meskhi Stadium, Tbilisi
Attendance: 0
Referee: Gergő Bogár (Hungary)
Switzerland   Flag of Switzerland.svg2–1Flag of Azerbaijan.svg  Azerbaijan
Report
Stockhorn Arena, Thun
Attendance: 0
Referee: Kaspar Sjöberg (Sweden)
Liechtenstein  Flag of Liechtenstein.svg0–5Flag of France.svg  France
Report
Rheinpark Stadion, Vaduz
Attendance: 0
Referee: Morten Krogh (Denmark)

France  Flag of France.svg3–1Flag of Switzerland.svg   Switzerland
Report
Stade Michel d'Ornano, Caen
Attendance: 0
Referee: Vitali Meshkov (Russia)

Slovakia  Flag of Slovakia.svg6–0Flag of Liechtenstein.svg  Liechtenstein
Report
Štadión pod Zoborom, Nitra
Attendance: 0
Referee: Nicolas Laforge (Belgium)

Goalscorers

There have been 106 goals scored in 30 matches, for an average of 3.53 goals per match (as of 17 November 2020).

11 goals

9 goals

4 goals

3 goals

2 goals

1 goal

1 own goal

Notes

  1. CEST (UTC+2) for dates between 31 March and 26 October 2019 and between 29 March and 24 October 2020, and CET (UTC+1) for all other dates.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 Due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Europe, all matches scheduled for September 2020 were played behind closed doors. [7] [8]
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 All matches originally scheduled to be played in March 2020 were postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Europe. [3] These matches were subsequently rescheduled to be played in November 2020.

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References

  1. "2020/21 Under-21 qualifying draw". UEFA.com.
  2. "2019-21 UEFA European Under-21 Championship regulations" (PDF). UEFA.
  3. "COVID-19: latest updates on UEFA competitions". UEFA.com. 17 March 2020.
  4. "UEFA competitions to resume in August". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 17 June 2020. Retrieved 17 June 2020.
  5. "Updated UEFA competitions calendar". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 17 June 2020. Retrieved 17 June 2020.
  6. "Under-21 EURO: New format and schedule announced". UEFA.com. 17 June 2020.
  7. "UEFA meets general secretaries of member associations". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 19 August 2020. Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  8. "UEFA Super Cup to test partial return of spectators". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 25 August 2020. Retrieved 1 September 2020.