Alfred Toogood

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Alfred Toogood
AlfredToogood.JPG
Toogood in 1907
Personal information
Full nameAlfred Henry Toogood
Born1872
St Helens, Isle of Wight
DiedJuly 1928 (aged 56)
South Norwood, London, England
Sporting nationalityFlag of England.svg  England
Career
Turned professionalc.1889
Professional wins2
Best results in major championships
Masters Tournament DNP
PGA Championship DNP
U.S. Open DNP
The Open Championship 4th: 1894

Alfred Henry Toogood, Sr. (1872 – July 1928) was an English professional golfer who played during the late 19th and early 20th century. Toogood finished fourth in the 1894 Open Championship and won £7. He also tied for ninth place in the 1895 Open Championship. [1]

Contents

Early life

Toogood lived at Eddington Road in the village of St Helens, located on the eastern side of the Isle of Wight. He was a frequent player at the Royal Links Club there. When he began to start a family he found it difficult to come up with enough money to play tournaments. He turned pro at the newly opened Eltham Warren Golf Club in London. He then worked at the Minchinhampton Golf Club in the Cotswolds (1895–1900), in Headingley at Leeds Golf Club (1900–1902), West Essex Golf Club (1902–1907), at Tramore in Ireland (1907–1909) and, finally, at Beckenham in Kent (1909–1911). His cousin Walter was also a professional golfer.

Golf career

1894 Open Championship

The 1894 Open Championship was held 11–12 June at Royal St George's Golf Club in Sandwich, England. English professional J.H. Taylor won the Championship by five strokes from runner-up Douglas Rolland. [1] This was the first Open Championship held outside Scotland. Toogood played superb golf—mastering the high winds that blew during the tournament, particularly on day one—and finished in fourth place and took home £7 in prize money. His score was 84-85-82-82=333.

1895 Open Championship

The 1895 Open Championship was held 12–13 June at the Old Course at St Andrews, Fife, Scotland. Defending champion J.H. Taylor won the Championship for the second time, by four strokes from runner-up Sandy Herd. [1] Toogood didn't fare as well as he did in the previous year's Open but he still managed a top-10, finishing in a tie for ninth place with the brother duo of Harry and Tom Vardon and Ben Sayers. He won £2 as his share of the purse with a score of 85-84-83-86=338.

1904 News of the World PGA Match Play Championship

Toogood was runner-up to J.H. Taylor in the 1904 News of the World PGA Match Play Championship which was contested at Royal Mid-Surrey Golf Club. In very windy conditions Toogood had a terrible first round in the final. He was 6 down after 9 holes and 8 down after 17 before Taylor missed a short putt at the last to be just 7 up at lunch. Play was easier in the afternoon and Toogood's golf was much better. Taylor, however, was still 7 up with 8 holes to play. Toogood then won the 11th, 12th and 13th to reduce the lead to 4 holes before the 14th was halved and Taylor won the 15th to win 5 and 3. [2] In the 1905 News of the World PGA Match Play Championship, Toogood defeated Tom Simpson at the last-16 stage. [3]

1905 Tooting Bec Cup

Toogood won the 1905 Tooting Bec Cup. [4] The event was a 36-hole stroke play event held on 3 May at Northwood Golf Club. James Braid led after the first round with a 74, Toogood scoring 77. Braid had a poor second round of 79 and Toogood took the lead with a 73. J.H. Taylor missed an 8-foot putt to tie Toogood and finished second. [4] The Tooting Bec Cup is currently awarded each year by the Professional Golfers' Association of Great Britain and Ireland to the association member born in, or with a parent or parents born in, the United Kingdom or Republic of Ireland who returns the lowest single-round score in The Open Championship. [5] [6]

1907 London Professional Foursomes Tournament

Toogood and Rowland Jones reached the final of the 1907 London Professional Foursomes Tournament. They were to play Ralph Smith and Albert Tingey, Sr. and the match was arranged for 27 February. However, Jones had arranged to play in Grand Duke Michael's Tournament in Cannes on 26 and 27 February and so could not play on the pre-arranged date. It was suggested that the final be postponed but it was argued that Jones should not have entered unless he was available and so Smith and Tingey claimed the final. [7] [8]

In late August a 108-hole match was arranged on the Isle of Wight between the finalists. 36 holes were played on three successive days on three different courses, at St Helens, the Needles and Sandown. [9] Jones and Toogood, both of whom were from the Isle of Wight, won comfortably 12 and 10. [10]

Family

Toogood's son, Alf, was also a golf professional, winning the South Australian Professional Championship twice and the Tasmanian Open twice. His grandson, Peter Toogood, was a leading amateur golfer in the late 1940s and 1950s who won the Tasmanian Open eight times, including six consecutive: 1949, 1951, 1954–59. [11] Peter Toogood was also the leading amateur four times in the Australian Open, and in 1954 was leading amateur in The Open Championship. [11]

Death

Toogood died in 1928 at South Norwood, London, England. [12]

Tournament wins (2)

Results in major championships

Tournament189418951896189718981899
The Open Championship 4T917T22DNP23
Tournament190019011902190319041905190619071908
The Open Championship DNPDNPDNPT18T12WDCUT24T18

Note: Toogood only played in The Open Championship.

DNP = Did not play
CUT = Missed the half-way cut
WD = Withdrew
Yellow background for top-10

Team appearances

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References

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  2. "Golf - Professional Golfers' Association Tournament - Victory of Taylor". The Times. 7 October 1904. p. 9.
  3. "The professional association". The Glasgow Herald . 14 July 1904. p. 10.
  4. 1 2 "Golf - Professional Golfers' Association Tournament". The Times. 4 May 1905. p. 12.
  5. "Tooting Bec Cup". Professional Golfers' Association (Great Britain & Ireland). Archived from the original on 5 October 2012. Retrieved 5 May 2015.
  6. "Tooting Bec Cup". PGA European Tour. Retrieved 5 May 2015.
  7. "Golf – London Professional Foursome Tournament". The Times. 22 February 1907. p. 8.
  8. "Golf – London Professional Foursome Tournament". The Times. 23 February 1907. p. 12.
  9. "Professional Foursome for £50". The Times. 23 May 1907. p. 10.
  10. "Professional Foursome for £50". The Times. 31 August 1907. p. 9.
  11. 1 2 "Peter Alfred Toogood MBE". Department of Premier and Cabinet, Tasmania.
  12. "Golf - Death of Former International". The Times. 24 July 1928. p. 8.
  13. "PGA Midland Professional Championship". BlueGolf.com.