American Football League All-Star game

Last updated

The American Football League All-Star game was the annual game which featured each year's best performers in the American Football League (AFL). The game was first played in 1961 and the final AFL All-Star game occurred in 1969, prior to the league's merger with the National Football League (NFL).

Contents

All-League Teams

The Sporting News published American Football League All-League Teams for each season played by the American Football League, 1960 through 1969. From 1960 through 1966, the All-League team was selected by the AFL players, and from 1967 through 1969 it was selected by a consensus of The Sporting News (TSN), the Associated Press (AP), United Press International (UPI), and the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA). The All-League AFL selections usually included one player at each team position on offense and on defense (i.e., one quarterback, two guards, four defensive backs, etc.).

All-Star Teams

The AFL did not have an All-star game after its first season in 1960 but from 1961 through 1969, other AFL players were added to the All-League players to form two squads, and the league held All-Star games for those seasons. After every season except 1965, the format consisted of games between All-Star teams from the Eastern and Western divisions. In 1965, the league champion Buffalo Bills played all-stars from the other teams.

The Pro Football Hall of Fame and the NFL include AFL All-Star Games in their statistics for the Pro Bowl. After the AFL–NFL merger of 1970, the name of the NFL's all-star game was changed to the AFC-NFC Pro Bowl . Buffalo Bills rookie running back O.J. Simpson carried the ball on the last play in AFL history in the Houston Astrodome at the 1969 All-Star Game on January 18, 1970.

The 1965 boycott

After the 1964 season, the AFL All-Star Game had been scheduled for early 1965 in New Orleans' Tulane Stadium. After numerous black players were refused service by a number of New Orleans hotels and businesses, black and white players alike lobbied for a boycott. The black players all left days before the game, saying that it was clear they were not wanted. [1] Under the leadership of Buffalo Bills players including Cookie Gilchrist, the players put up a unified front, and the game was successfully moved to Houston's Jeppesen Stadium. [2] [3]

Game history

SeasonDateScoreSeriesMost Valuable Player(s)VenueAttendanceHead CoachesTelevision
1961January 7, 1962
West, 47–27
West 1–0 Cotton Davidson, QB, Texans Balboa Stadium, San Diego 20,973E:Wally Lemm (Houston)
W:Sid Gillman (San Diego)
ABC
1962January 13, 1963
West, 21–14
West 2–0Offense: Curtis McClinton, RB, Dallas Texans
Defense: Earl Faison, DE, Chargers
Balboa Stadium, San Diego27,641E:Frank Ivy (Houston)
W:Hank Stram (Dallas)
ABC
1963January 19, 1964
West, 27–24
West 3–0Offense: Keith Lincoln, RB, Chargers
Defense: Archie Matsos, LB, Raiders
Balboa Stadium, San Diego20,016E:Mike Holovak (Boston)
W:Sid Gillman (San Diego)
ABC
1964January 16, 1965 [4]
West, 38–14
West 4–0Offense: Keith Lincoln, RB, Chargers
Defense: Willie Brown, DB, Broncos
Jeppesen Stadium, Houston, Texas 15,446E:Lou Saban (Buffalo)
W:Sid Gillman (San Diego)
ABC
1965January 15, 1966 [4]
AFL All-Stars 30,
Buffalo Bills 19
-Offense: Joe Namath, QB, Jets
Defense: Frank Buncom, LB, Chargers
Rice Stadium, Houston35,572Buffalo:Lou Saban
AS:Sid Gillman (San Diego)
NBC
1966January 21, 1967 [4]
East, 30–23
West 4–1Offense: Babe Parilli, QB, Boston Patriots
Defense: Verlon Biggs, DE, Jets
Oakland–Alameda County Coliseum, Oakland, California 18,876E:Mike Holovak (Boston)
W:John Rauch (Oakland)
NBC
1967January 21, 1968
East, 25–24
West 4–2Offense: Joe Namath, QB, Jets; and Don Maynard, F, Jets
Defense: Speedy Duncan, DB/KR, Chargers
Gator Bowl, Jacksonville, Florida 40,103E: Joe Collier (Buffalo)
W:Lou Saban (Denver)
NBC
1968January 19, 1969
West, 38–25
West 5–2Offense: Len Dawson, QB, Chiefs
Defense: George Webster, LB, Houston Oilers
Gator Bowl, Jacksonville, Florida41,058E:George Wilson (Miami)
W:Lou Saban (Denver)
NBC
1969January 17, 1970 [4]
West, 26–3
West 6–2 John Hadl, QB, Chargers Astrodome, Houston30,170E:George Wilson (Miami)
W:Lou Saban (Denver)
NBC

Broadcasters

The following is a list of the television networks and announcers that broadcast the American Football League All-Star game during its existence.

SeasonNetwork Play-by-play Color commentator(s) Sideline reporter(s)
1961 [5] ABC Jack Buck Jim McKay George Ratterman
1962 [6] ABC Curt Gowdy Paul Christman and George Ratterman
1963 [7] ABC Curt Gowdy Paul Christman
1964 [8] ABC Curt Gowdy Paul Christman and George Ratterman
1965 [9] NBC Curt Gowdy Paul Christman Charlie Jones
1966 [10] NBC Curt Gowdy Paul Christman Charlie Jones
1967 [11] NBC Curt Gowdy Paul Christman
1968 [12] NBC Curt Gowdy Kyle Rote Charlie Jones
1969 [13] NBC Charlie Jones Al DeRogatis

See also

Related Research Articles

American Football League Professional football league that merged with National Football League in 1970

The American Football League (AFL) was a major professional American football league that operated for ten seasons from 1960 until 1970, when it merged with the older National Football League (NFL), and became the American Football Conference. The upstart AFL operated in direct competition with the more established NFL throughout its existence. It was more successful than earlier rivals to the NFL with the same name, the 1926, 1936 and 1940 leagues, and the later All-America Football Conference.

Billy Shaw

William Lewis Shaw is an American former professional football player who was an offensive guard for the Buffalo Bills in the American Football League (AFL). After playing college football with the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets, he was drafted by the Bills. Shaw was the prototypical "pulling guard" who despite his size held his own against much bigger defensive linemen like Ernie Ladd, Earl Faison and Buck Buchanan. He won three straight Eastern Division titles and two American Football League championships in 1964 and 1965 with Buffalo.

John Willard Hadl is a former American football player, a quarterback in the American Football League and National Football League for sixteen seasons, with the San Diego Chargers, Los Angeles Rams, Green Bay Packers, and Houston Oilers. He also served as a punter for five seasons. He was an AFL All-Star four times and was selected to two Pro Bowls. Hadl played collegiately at the University of Kansas, and was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1994.

Daryle Pasquale Lamonica is a former American football quarterback who played in the American Football League (AFL) and the National Football League (NFL) for 12 seasons, primarily with the Oakland Raiders. He spent his first four seasons mostly as a backup for the Buffalo Bills, who selected in the 24th round of the 1963 AFL Draft. Lamonica played his next eight seasons as the primary starter of the Raiders, including after they joined the NFL through the AFL–NFL merger.

Lance Dwight Alworth is an American former professional football player who was a wide receiver for the San Diego Chargers of the American Football League (AFL) and National Football League (NFL) and Dallas Cowboys of the NFL. He played for 11 seasons, from 1962 through 1972, and was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1978. He was the first player inducted whose playing career was principally in the AFL. Alworth is also a member of the College Football Hall of Fame.

The AFL–NFL merger was the merger of the two major professional American football leagues in the United States at the time: the National Football League (NFL) and the American Football League (AFL). It paved the way for the combined league, which retained the "National Football League" name and logo, to become the most popular sports league in the United States. The merger was announced on the evening of June 8, 1966. Under the merger agreement, the leagues maintained separate regular-season schedules for the next four seasons—from 1966 through 1969—and then officially merged before the 1970 season to form one league with two conferences.

Throughout its history, the National Football League (NFL) and other rival American football leagues have used several different formats to determine their league champions, including a period of inter-league matchups determining a true national champion.

Jan Stenerud Norwegian American football placekicker

Jan Stenerud is a Norwegian-American former football placekicker who played in the National Football League (NFL) and American Football League (AFL) for 19 seasons, primarily with Kansas City Chiefs. The first Norwegian NFL player, he began his career in the AFL after being selected by the Chiefs during the 1966 draft and joined the NFL following the AFL–NFL merger. Along with his 13 seasons in Kansas City, Stenerud was a member of the Green Bay Packers for four seasons and the Minnesota Vikings for two seasons until retiring in 1985.

Playoff Bowl Defunct NFL sports playoff game

The Playoff Bowl was a post-season game for third place in the National Football League (NFL), played ten times following the 1960 through 1969 seasons, all at the Orange Bowl in Miami, Florida.

For its first nine seasons, 1960 through 1968, the American Football League determined its champion via a single playoff game between the winners of its two divisions.

The American Football Conference – Eastern Division or AFC East is one of the four divisions of the American Football Conference (AFC) in the National Football League (NFL). There are currently four teams that reside in the division: the Buffalo Bills ; the Miami Dolphins ; the New England Patriots ; and the New York Jets.

The American Bowl was a series of National Football League pre-season exhibition games that were held at sites outside the United States between 1986 and 2005.

1965 American Football League Championship Game

The 1965 American Football League Championship Game was the sixth AFL championship game, played on December 26 at Balboa Stadium in San Diego, California.

1964 American Football League Championship Game

The 1964 American Football League Championship Game was the American Football League's fifth championship game, played at War Memorial Stadium in Buffalo, New York, on Saturday, December 26.

Since the 1960s, all regular season and playoff games broadcast in the United States have been aired by national television networks. When the rival American Football League (AFL) began in 1960, it signed a 5-year television contract with ABC. This became the first ever cooperative television plan for professional football, through which the proceeds of the contract were divided equally among member clubs. ABC and the AFL also introduced moving, on-field cameras, and were the first to have players "miked" during broadcast games. As the AFL also had players' names stitched on their jerseys, it was easier for both TV viewers and people at the games to tell who was who.

References

  1. Thomas, Ben (January 11, 1965). "American football League calls off All-Star game set for New Orleans". The Day. New London, Connecticut. Associated Press. p. 18.
  2. "AFL All-Star game moved to Houston". Morning Record. Meriden, Connecticut. January 12, 1965. p. 5.
  3. "New Orleans: pro grid nightmare". St. Petersburg Independent. Florida. Associated Press. January 12, 1965. p. 11A.
  4. 1 2 3 4 game played on Saturday.
  5. 1961 NFL-AFL Commentator Crews [ permanent dead link ]
  6. 1962 NFL-AFL Commentator Crews [ permanent dead link ]
  7. 1963 NFL-AFL Commentator Crews Archived December 11, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  8. 1964 NFL-AFL Commentator Crews Archived December 11, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  9. 1965 NFL-AFL Commentator Crews Archived December 11, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  10. 1966 NFL-AFL Commentator Crews Archived December 11, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  11. 1967 NFL-AFL Commentator Crews Archived December 11, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  12. 1968 NFL-AFL Commentator Crews Archived December 11, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  13. 1969 NFL-AFL Commentator Crews Archived December 11, 2008, at the Wayback Machine