Arkansas Supreme Court

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Arkansas Supreme Court
Seal of the Supreme Court of Arkansas.svg
Seal of the Supreme Court of Arkansas
Established 1841 (1841)
CountryFlag of the United States.svg  USA
Location 625 Marshall Street, Little Rock, Arkansas
Composition method Non-partisan election
Authorized by Arkansas Constitution
Decisions are appealed to Supreme Court of the United States
No. of positions 1 chief justice, 6 associate justices
Website Official website
Chief Justice
Currently John Dan Kemp
Judiciary of Arkansas

Supreme Court
Court of Appeals
Circuit Court(Drug Court)
District Court
City Court

Arkansas Supreme Court the highest court in the U.S. state of Arkansas

The Arkansas Supreme Court is the highest court in the U.S. state of Arkansas. Since 1925, it has consisted of a Chief Justice and six Associate Justices, and at times Special Justices are called upon in the absence of a regular justice. The Justices are elected in a non-partisan election for eight-year-long terms that are staggered to make it unlikely that the entire court would be replaced in a single election. Any vacancy caused by a Justice not finishing his or her term is filled by an appointment made by the Governor of Arkansas.

Arkansas Court of Appeals

The Arkansas Court of Appeals is the intermediate appellate court for the state of Arkansas. It was created in 1978 by Amendment 58 of the Arkansas Constitution, which was implemented by Act 208 of the Arkansas General Assembly in 1979. The court handed down its first opinions for publication on August 8, 1979.

Contents

The Arkansas Supreme Court is the highest court in the U.S. state of Arkansas. Since 1925, [1] it has consisted of a Chief Justice and six Associate Justices, and at times Special Justices are called upon in the absence of a regular justice. The Justices are elected in a non-partisan election for eight-year-long terms that are staggered to make it unlikely that the entire court would be replaced in a single election. [1] Any vacancy caused by a Justice not finishing his or her term is filled by an appointment made by the Governor of Arkansas. [1]

In the United States, a state supreme court is the ultimate judicial tribunal in the court system of a particular state. On matters of state law, the decisions of a state supreme court are considered final and binding on state and even United States federal courts.

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders. Four states use the term commonwealth rather than state in their full official names.

The current Arkansas Supreme Court includes:

John Dan Kemp is the Chief Justice of the Arkansas Supreme Court.

Robin French Wynne is an Arkansas Supreme Court justice elected in 2014. He was previously a judge on the Arkansas Court of Appeals, District 5 from 2011 until being sworn into the Arkansas Supreme Court in 2015. Prior to serving on the Court of Appeals, he was the Dallas County District Judge between 2004-2010.

Courtney Hudson Goodson is a justice of the Arkansas Supreme Court. She was elected to the position in 2010.

Under the state's first constitution, the Arkansas Supreme Court consisted of three judges including one Chief Justice, and all three of whom were elected by the Arkansas General Assembly. The first judges elected to the court by the Assembly [1] were Daniel Ringo as Chief Justice (who served from 1836 to 1844), [2] [3] Townsend Dickinson (who served until 1842 [2] ), and Thomas J. Lacy (whose term lasted until 1845 [2] ).

Arkansas General Assembly legislature of Arkansas

The Arkansas General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Arkansas. The legislature is a bicameral body composed of the upper house Arkansas Senate with 35 members, and the lower Arkansas House of Representatives with 100 members. All 135 representatives and state senators represent an equal amount of constituent districts. The General Assembly convenes on the second Monday of every other year. A session lasts for 60 days unless the legislature votes to extend it. The Governor of Arkansas can issue a "call" for a special session during the interims between regular sessions. The General Assembly meets at the Arkansas State Capitol in Little Rock.

Daniel Ringo was a United States federal judge in Arkansas who sided with the Confederacy during the American Civil War.

No change to the court's size occurred after Reconstruction, but the Arkansas Constitution of 1874 was amended in 1924 (Amendment 9) to add two more judges and allow the Assembly to increase the number to seven, which it did a year later by Act 205 of 1925. [1]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 Justices of the Arkansas Supreme Court from the official Arkansas Judiciary website
  2. 1 2 3 Justices, Judges and Officers of the Courts from the official Arkansas Judiciary website
  3. Daniel Ringo from Find A Grave

Coordinates: 34°44′42″N92°17′27″W / 34.745099°N 92.290773°W / 34.745099; -92.290773