University of Arkansas School of Law

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University of Arkansas School of Law
University of Arkansas School of Law seal.png
Parent school University of Arkansas
Established1924
School type Public
EndowmentUS$84.2 million [1]
Parent endowmentUS$939.8 million [2] [3] [4]
Dean Margaret Sova McCabe
Location Fayetteville, Arkansas, United States
36°04′11″N94°10′29″W / 36.06972°N 94.17480°W / 36.06972; -94.17480 Coordinates: 36°04′11″N94°10′29″W / 36.06972°N 94.17480°W / 36.06972; -94.17480
Enrollment410 [5]
Faculty58 [6]
USNWR ranking91 [7]
Website law.uark.edu
ABA profile Arkansas School of Law Profile
University of Arkansas School of Law logo.jpg

The University of Arkansas School of Law is the law school of the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, Arkansas, a state university. It has around 445 students enrolled in its Juris Doctor (J.D.) and Master of Law (LL.M) programs and is home to the nation's only LL.M in agricultural law program. The School of Law is one of two law schools in the state of Arkansas; the other is the William H. Bowen School of Law (University of Arkansas at Little Rock).

Law school institution specializing in legal education

A law school is an institution specializing in legal education, usually involved as part of a process for becoming a lawyer within a given jurisdiction.

University of Arkansas Public research university in Fayetteville, Arkansas, USA

The University of Arkansas is a public land-grant, research university in Fayetteville, Arkansas. It is the flagship campus of the University of Arkansas System and the largest, best-known university in the state. Founded as Arkansas Industrial University in 1871, its present name was adopted in 1899 and classes were first held on January 22, 1872. It is noted for its strong architecture, agriculture, business, communication disorders, creative writing, history, law, and Middle Eastern studies programs.

Fayetteville, Arkansas City in Arkansas, United States

Fayetteville is the third-largest city in Arkansas and county seat of Washington County. The city is centrally located within the county and has been home of the University of Arkansas since the institution's founding in 1871. Fayetteville is on the outskirts of the Boston Mountains, deep within the Ozarks. Known as Washington until 1829, the city was named after Fayetteville, Tennessee, from which many of the settlers had come. It was incorporated on November 3, 1836 and was rechartered in 1867. The four-county Northwest Arkansas Metropolitan Statistical Area is ranked 105th in terms of population in the United States with 463,204 in 2010 according to the United States Census Bureau. The city had a population of 73,580 at the 2010 Census.

Contents

According to the University of Arkansas School of Law's 2013 ABA-required disclosures, 68% of the Class of 2013 had obtained full-time, long-term, JD-required employment nine months after graduation. [8]

History

The School of Law was founded in 1924. The founding dean was Julian Waterman, a Dumas, Arkansas native and University of Chicago Law School graduate who led the school through its first 19 years, until his death in 1943.

Dean is a title employed in academic administrations such as colleges or universities for a person with significant authority over a specific academic unit, over a specific area of concern, or both. Deans are common in private preparatory schools, and occasionally found in middle schools and high schools as well.

Dumas, Arkansas City in Arkansas, United States

Dumas is a city in Desha County, Arkansas, United States. The population was 4,706 at the 2010 census.

University of Chicago Law School law school

The University of Chicago Law School is a professional graduate school of the University of Chicago. It employs more than 200 full-time and part-time faculty and hosts more than 600 students in its Juris Doctor program, while also offering the Master of Laws, Master of Studies in Law and Doctor of Juridical Science degrees in law. It is consistently ranked among the top law schools in the world, and has produced many distinguished alumni in the judiciary, academia, government, politics and business.

The School met initially in the bottom floor of Old Main, and was approved by the American Bar Association two years later, in 1926. In 1927, the first class, consisting of ten students, graduated.

Old Main (University of Arkansas) building on the University of Arkansas campus

Old Main is the oldest building on the University of Arkansas campus in Fayetteville, Arkansas. It is one of the most recognizable symbols of the University, and of higher education in general in Arkansas.

American Bar Association association of lawyers

The American Bar Association (ABA), founded August 21, 1878, is a voluntary bar association of lawyers and law students, which is not specific to any jurisdiction in the United States. The ABA's most important stated activities are the setting of academic standards for law schools, and the formulation of model ethical codes related to the legal profession. The ABA has 410,000 members. Its national headquarters are in Chicago, Illinois; it also maintains a significant branch office in Washington, D.C.

Over the next several decades, as the law school grew in size, it moved to larger accommodations. The 1930s saw a move to the Chemistry Building just to the southeast of Old Main, and then into Waterman Hall, the first dedicated law school construction project, in the 1950s. The latter half of the 20th century saw additions added to Waterman Hall to form the Robert A. Leflar Law Center.

In 1947, the law school offered admission to L. Clifford Davis, under conditions that would not allow him to be in any room at the same room as white students, including classrooms, restrooms, and the library. Davis chose to instead to take tuition money from the state to attend Howard University, in Washington, D.C. [9] On February 2, 1948, the University of Arkansas School of Law became the first Southern white university to accept an African-American student since Reconstruction. Silas H. Hunt, a World War II veteran who had been wounded in the Battle of the Bulge and following the conclusion of the war had completed an undergraduate degree in English at Arkansas Agricultural, Mechanical & Normal College applied to multiple law schools in 1947. He chose to seek entry at the Arkansas School of Law to challenge the system of racial segregation established in Arkansas at the time. [10] Accompanied by his attorney, Howard Flowers, Hunt met with the dean of the law school, Robert A. Leflar, who reviewed Hunt's application. Leflar was impressed and accepted Hunt's application to the law school. For a semester, Hunt attended the law school until succumbing to illness, and dying in a veteran's hospital on April 22, 1949, in Springfield, Missouri. [10]

L. Clifford Davis is an attorney from Wilton, Arkansas, whose unsuccessful efforts for admission to the University of Arkansas Law School resulted in the eventual admission of African-American students to the school. He also served over thirty years as an attorney and judge, and assisted Thurgood Marshall in the case that became Brown v Board.

Southern United States Cultural region of the United States

The southern United States, also known as the American South, Dixie, Dixieland, or simply the South, is a region of the United States of America. It is located between the Atlantic Ocean and the western United States, with the midwestern United States and northeastern United States to its north and the Gulf of Mexico and Mexico to its south.

Silas Herbert Hunt was a U.S. veteran of World War II who became the first African American student to enroll in a white Southern university since the Reconstruction era. He enrolled in the University of Arkansas School of Law on Feb. 2, 1948, breaking the color barrier in higher education and starting integration of colleges and universities in the South.

Following Hunt's successful entry into the law school, five more African-American students applied and were accepted into the law school: George Williford Boyce Haley, who went on to become a United States Ambassador to The Gambia; Wiley Branton, who served as dean at the Howard University School of Law; Jackie L. Shropshire; Chris Mercer; and George Howard, Jr., who later became the first black United States district court judge in Arkansas. [11] Collectively they are known as the "Six Pioneers." Silas H. Hunt Hall, located adjacent to the Robert A. Leflar Law Center, honors Silas Hunt, in addition, to a historical marker in front of the law school.

Howard University School of Law is one of the professional graduate schools of Howard University. Located in Washington, D.C., it is one of the oldest law schools in the country and the oldest historically black college or university law school in the United States.

United States district court type of court of the United States federal court system

The United States district courts are the general trial courts of the United States federal court system. Both civil and criminal cases are filed in the district court, which is a court of law, equity, and admiralty. There is a United States bankruptcy court associated with each United States district court. Each federal judicial district has at least one courthouse, and many districts have more than one. The formal name of a district court is "the United States District Court for" the name of the district—for example, the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri.

In 2007, a 64,000-square-foot (5,900 m2) addition to the Leflar Law Center was completed, expanding on the Young Law Library, as well as adding a coffee shop, four classrooms, a technologically equipped courtroom, and a formal entrance hall.

Facilities

New southwest addition of law school UAlawschoolnewwing.jpg
New southwest addition of law school

The University of Arkansas School of Law is self-contained within the Robert A. Leflar Law Center on the campus of the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, which is located in Washington County in Northwest Arkansas at the edge of the rolling hills of the Ozarks.

The law center is a square facility with four wings around a courtyard. It consists of approximately 64,000 square feet (5,900 m2), a courtroom, classrooms, and the Young Law Library. In addition to legal library resources, the Young Law Library includes a coffeeshop, computer lab and lounge area,

The legal clinic of the law school has been in operation for more than thirty years, offering free legal services to charities, government agencies, and individuals unable to afford legal representation. The goal of the Legal Clinic, which offers the services of student attorneys, is firstly to train competently students in specific areas of legal practice encountered in every day law practice; and secondly to provide an opportunity for students to refine basic lawyering skills, such as counseling, interviewing and persuasive legal writing. [12]

Clinics

New addition to the Robert A. Leflar Law Center Uarklaw.jpg
New addition to the Robert A. Leflar Law Center

The School of Law was the first school in the country to publish a student-edited legal journal devoted to the study of food law and its impact on society, the Journal of Food Law & Policy. [13]

Journals

The School of Law publishes four legal journals.:

Ranking and recognition

The 2013 edition of U.S. News & World Report 's "Best Law Schools" ranked the Arkansas School of Law as 68th overall. [18] US News also ranked Arkansas School of Law's legal writing and research 22nd in the country. [18] LawSchool100.com ranked the Arkansas School of Law as 88th overall in its 2010 ranking of law schools. [19] The Arkansas School of Law was also ranked 73rd overall according to the 2010 ranking by the AALS. [20] The ILRG ranked the Arkansas School of Law 71st overall in its 2009-2010 ranking of law schools. [21] The ILRG also has numerous other categories and ranks the Arkansas School of Law as the 62nd most selective law school, 65th for job placement before graduation, 55th for job placement after 9 months, 77th for best bar passer rates among first time takers, 98th when ranking the school versus the state average for bar passage rates and 72nd for student to faculty ratio. [22] [23] [24] [25] Law & Politics' 2010 ranking of law schools ranked the Arkansas School of Law 139th overall. [26] Leiter's ranking of most desirable law schools lists Arkansas as the 54th most desirable law school in the country. [27] [28] Law.com ranks Arkansas as 100th overall for best job placement and employment trends into "BigLaw". [29] In 2010, The Hylton Rankings place the Arkansas School of Law 86th overall among all law schools. [30] The Arkansas School of Law ranks 65th overall for percentage of class that obtain federal clerkships and 85th for total number of students obtaining federal clerkships. [31] [32] Brian Koppen's Law School Advocacy ranks the Arkansas School of Law as 46th overall. [33] The 2010 National Moot Court rankings place the Arkansas School of Law at 13th overall. [34]

Admissions

Enrolled137
GPA (75/25)3.73/3.35
LSAT (75/25)159/155
Acceptance rate31%

The University of Arkansas has LSAT scores that are similar to its peers and GPA ranges that exceed that of its peer schools. [35] The law school uses an index system to aid in the cutoff process that weights GPA and LSAT to reach a total index number. Applicants below the index will not fare as well as those with index scores above the index cutoff. [36] In 2010 the University of Arkansas school of law admitted 31% of applicants and since 2001 have averaged an acceptance rate of 34%. [37] Full-time enrollment in the most recent class was 137 students; the school of law only offers a full-time program of study. [37] The LSAT 75%/25% percentiles and medians were 159, 155, and 158 respectively. The GPA 75%/25% percentiles and medians were 3.73, 3.35, and 3.53 respectively. [37]

Career placement

ABA employment summary for 2013 graduates [38]
Employment statusPercentage
Employed - Bar Passage Required
70.45%
Employed - J.D. Advantage
13.64%
Employed - Professional Position
1.52%
Employed - Non-Professional Position
0.0%
Employed - Undeterminable
0.0%
Pursuing Graduate Degree Full Time
5.3%
Unemployed - Start Date Deferred
0.0%
Unemployed - Not Seeking
1.52%
Unemployed - Seeking
6.06%
Employment Status Unknown
1.52%
Total of 132 graduates

According to the University of Arkansas School of Law's official 2013 ABA-required disclosures, 68.18% of the Class of 2013 had obtained full-time, long-term, JD-required employment nine months after graduation. [8] The University of Arkansas School of Law's Law School Transparency under-employment score is 15.9%, indicating the percentage of the Class of 2013 unemployed, pursuing an additional degree, or working in a non-professional, short-term, or part-time job nine months after graduation. [39]

The University of Arkansas School of Law places graduates in all nine geographic regions according to the Association for Legal Career Professionals. [40] The school does place a majority in its home region, West South Central, with 71% of its graduates finding employment in region, and 53 percent of those staying in the West South Central region obtain employment in the state of Arkansas. [41] The most popular states for University of Arkansas School of Law graduates to find employment are in Arkansas, Texas, Missouri, Oklahoma, Georgia, Tennessee, and Mississippi. [42] The table to the right represents regional placement, with percentages, for University of Arkansas School of Law graduates. [43] The University of Arkansas has alumni that practice in all 50 states and the District of Columbia and six foreign nations. The ABA also collects data on placement and puts them into six major categories. [6] They are law firms, business and industry, government, judicial clerkships, academia, and public interest. [6] The University of Arkansas School of Law places a majority of its students into law firms, but significant portions of the class still obtain employment in other fields—business and industry, government, and judicial clerkships. [6] The table to the left represents the fields of placement, with percentages, for the most recent class from the University of Arkansas School of Law. [6]

Prior to the requirement that students complete law school before taking the bar exam, Maud Crawford, who attended UA as an undergraduate for one year from 1911 to 1912, passed the examination first in her class. She became the first woman lawyer in Camden and served from 1940 to 1948 as the first woman on the Camden City Council. Her still unsolved disappearance on March 2, 1957, became the subject of international concern because she had been a law partner of U.S. Senator John Little McClellan, the former Camden resident who at the time was investigating Mafia infiltration of organized labor. [44]

Costs

The total cost of attendance (indicating the cost of tuition, fees, and living expenses) at the University of Arkansas School of Law for the 2014-2015 academic year is $32,487.70. [45] The Law School Transparency estimated debt-financed cost of attendance for three years is $120,784. [46]

People

Notable faculty

Notable alumni

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