Calling the Hogs

Last updated

Calling the Hogs is a tradition of University of Arkansas students, alumni, and sports fans. The origin and date of first use are not known. [1] The cheer is the best-known cheer at the University. [2]

University of Arkansas public research university in Fayetteville, Arkansas, USA

The University of Arkansas is a public land-grant, research university in Fayetteville, Arkansas. It is the flagship campus of the University of Arkansas System and the largest, best-known university in the state. Founded as Arkansas Industrial University in 1871, its present name was adopted in 1899 and classes were first held on January 22, 1872. It is noted for its strong architecture, agriculture, business, communication disorders, creative writing, history, law, and Middle Eastern studies programs.

Contents

The tradition is said to have started in the 1920s when people attempted to encourage a Razorback football team that was losing. [3] The next home game produced a group who repeated the cheer often. [3]

Arkansas Razorbacks football

The Arkansas Razorbacks football program represents the University of Arkansas, located in Fayetteville, Arkansas, in the sport of American football. The Razorbacks compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Western Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The program has 1 claimed national championship awarded by the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) and Helms Athletic Foundation (HAF) in 1964, 1 unclaimed national championship awarded by the Foundation for the Analysis of Competitions and Tournaments (FACT) in 1977, 13 conference championships, 45 All-Americans, and an all-time record of 701–475–40. The Razorbacks are the 23rd-ranked team in college football history by total number of wins. Home games are played at locations on or near the two largest campuses of the University of Arkansas System: Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville, and War Memorial Stadium in Little Rock.

The Hog call is not confined to Razorback Stadium, where it is used before every kickoff, and may be used in locales such as airports and hotels where Razorback fans unite. [2]

Procedure

Madre Hill leads a hog call in Razorback Stadium Hog call.jpg
Madre Hill leads a hog call in Razorback Stadium
Razorbacks fans call the hogs at Bud Walton Arena during a game vs Kentucky. Kentucky at Arkansas basketball, 2013 006.jpg
Razorbacks fans call the hogs at Bud Walton Arena during a game vs Kentucky.

Fans begin a hog call with a "Woo", which increases in volume and also includes raising the arms with fingers wiggling up and down. Razorback fans have stated that the Woo should last eleven seconds. [4] The arms are brought down during the "pig" and the hands are clenched into a fist. "Sooie" is accompanied with a fist pump. After the third call, "Razorbacks" is added with two additional fist pumps. [2]

Jazz hands

Jazz hands in performance dance is the extension of a performer's hands with palms toward the audience and fingers splayed. It is commonly associated with especially exuberant types of performance such as musicals, cheerleading, show choir, revue, and especially jazz dance shows. In cheerleading, the position with arms outstretched and fingers wiggling up and down is sometimes referred to as spirit fingers or jazz fingers. Depending on the performance venue, both gestures can be associated with campiness.

Lyrics

Woooooooooo, Pig! Sooie!
Woooooooooo, Pig! Sooie!
Woooooooooo, Pig! Sooie!
Razorbacks!

Etymology

The distinctive call is likely a degraded form of Latin, as the Razorback, or wild boar, is a member of the pig family, which in the Linnean classification (Latin) naming system is Suidae. 'Sooie' is a pig calling call in the north east of England, as is 'Giss giss'.

Suidae A family of mammals belonging to even-toed ungulates

Suidae is a family of artiodactyl mammals which are commonly called pigs, hogs or boars. In addition to numerous fossil species, 17 extant species are currently recognized, classified into between four and eight genera. The family includes the domestic pig, Sus scrofa domesticus or Sus domesticus, in addition to numerous species of wild pig, such as babirusas and warthogs. All suids, or swine, are native to the Old World, ranging from Asia to Europe and Africa.

See also

Related Research Articles

Hog may refer to:

Frank Broyles American college football coach, college athletic director

John Franklin Broyles was an American football player and coach, athletics administrator, and broadcaster. He served as the head football coach at the University of Missouri in 1957 and at the University of Arkansas from 1958 to 1976. Broyles also was Arkansas' athletic director from 1974 until his retirement on December 31, 2007.

Houston Nutt American college football player, college football coach, quarterback

Houston Dale Nutt Jr. is a former American football coach and former player. He currently works for CBS Sports as a college football studio analyst. Previously, he served as the head football coach at Murray State University (1993–1996), Boise State University (1997), the University of Arkansas (1998–2007), and University of Mississippi (2008–2011). Nutt's all-time career winning percentage is just under 59 percent.

Feral pig common name for feral pig, wild boar or cross in North America

The feral pig is a pig living in the wild, but which has descended from escaped domesticated individuals in both the Old and New Worlds. Razorback and wild hog are American colloquialisms, loosely applied to any type of feral domestic pig, wild boar, or hybrid in North America; pure wild boar are sometimes called "Russian boar" or "Russian razorbacks". The term "razorback" has also appeared in Australia, to describe feral pigs there.

Baum–Walker Stadium Baseball park at University of Arkansas

Baum–Walker Stadium at George Cole Field is the home venue of the Arkansas Razorbacks baseball team of the NCAA Division I Southeastern Conference, located in Fayetteville, Arkansas, United States. The playing field itself is named George Cole Field, in honor of the former Arkansas athletic director. George Cole Field was also the name of the Razorbacks' old home stadium, in use from 1975 to March 1996. Baum Stadium replaced George Cole Field in April 1996. The stadium is located one-half mile from the main Arkansas campus, which lies across Razorback Road from the stadium. On January 31, 2019 the stadium was renamed Baum–Walker Stadium at George Cole Field in recognition of longtime support from the Walker Family and the Willard and Pat Walker Charitable Foundation.

Paul Eells was an American sportscaster.

Big Red (University of Arkansas)

Big Red is the main costumed mascot of the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, Arkansas. The mascot is modeled after the wild razorback hog.

Tusk (mascot) mascot for the University of Arkansas Razorbacks

Tusk is the name of the official live mascot for the University of Arkansas Razorbacks. The current live mascot is Tusk IV. All Tusks so far have been male and from the same lineage.

The 1977 Arkansas Razorbacks football team represented the University of Arkansas in the Southwest Conference (SWC) during the 1977 NCAA Division I football season. In their first year under head coach Lou Holtz, the Razorbacks compiled an 11–1 record, finished in second place in the SWC, and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 389 to 101. The Razorbacks' only loss was to SWC champion Texas by a 13–9 score. The team advanced to 1978 Orange Bowl, defeating #2 Oklahoma by a 31–6 score. Arkansas was ranked #3 in both the final AP Poll and the final UPI Coaches Poll.

2002 Arkansas Razorbacks football team

The 2002 Arkansas Razorbacks football team represented the University of Arkansas in the 2002 NCAA Division I-A football season. The Razorbacks played five home games at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium in Fayetteville, Arkansas and three home games at War Memorial Stadium in Little Rock, Arkansas. The Razorbacks reached the 2002 SEC Championship Game and the 2002 Music City Bowl in Houston Nutt's fifth season as head coach.

The 1910 Arkansas Razorbacks football team represented the University of Arkansas during the 1910 college football season. In their third year under head coach Hugo Bezdek, the Razorbacks compiled a 7–1 record, shut out five of eight opponents, and outscored all opponents by a combined total of 221 to 19.

Arkansas–Ole Miss football rivalry

The Arkansas–Ole Miss football rivalry is an American college football rivalry between the Arkansas Razorbacks football team of the University of Arkansas and the Ole Miss Rebels football team of the University of Mississippi. The teams first met in 1908, and have played each other every year since 1981. Arkansas leads the series, which includes two wins by Ole Miss in postseason bowl games, the 1963 and 1970 Sugar Bowls.

The 1946 Arkansas Razorbacks football team represented the University of Arkansas in the Southwest Conference (SWC) during the 1946 college football season. In their first year under head coach John Barnhill, the Razorbacks compiled a 6–3–2 record, finished in a tie with Rice for first place in the SWC, and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 136 to 92. The Razorbacks advanced to the 1947 Cotton Bowl Classic, playing LSU to a scoreless tie.

Mr. Two Bits American college football cheerleader, mascot

George Edmondson Jr. is a retired insurance salesman from Tampa, Florida who is known to the University of Florida community as "Mr. Two Bits". Edmondson is a long-time fan of — and unofficial cheerleader for — the Florida Gators football team, for which he led a traditional "Two Bits' cheer at football games from 1949 until his "retirement" at the conclusion of the Gators' 2008 season.

The 1955 Cotton Bowl Classic was a post-season college football bowl game between the Southwest Conference champion Arkansas Razorbacks and the champions of the SEC, the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets. Georgia Tech defeated Arkansas, 14-6, in front of 75,550 spectators. Arkansas would get their revenge in the 1960 Gator Bowl, a 14-7 Hog win.

2009 Arkansas Razorbacks baseball team

The 2009 Arkansas Razorbacks baseball team represented the University of Arkansas in baseball at the Division I level in the NCAA for the 2009 season. Dave van Horn, a former Razorback player, is the coach in his fifth year. The team clinched a berth in the 2009 College World Series with a defeat of the Florida State Seminoles on June 6. The Razorbacks' run in Omaha ended on June 19 when they were defeated by the LSU Tigers, finishing tied for third nationally with the Arizona State Sun Devils.

2010 Arkansas Razorbacks football team

The 2010 Arkansas Razorbacks football team represented the University of Arkansas in the 2010 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team played five home games at Razorback Stadium and two home games at War Memorial Stadium. Coach Bobby Petrino was in his third year with the Razorbacks. They were members of the Western Division of the Southeastern Conference. The Razorbacks finished the season 10–2, 6–2 in SEC play and earned a berth in the Sugar Bowl, their first major bowl appearance in two decades, where they were defeated by Ohio State 26–31. However, Ohio State later vacated all of their 2010 season victories due to an NCAA violation involving improper benefits to some of their players.

References

  1. "Arkansas Football Traditions." Traditions - University of Arkansas. Retrieved on February 11, 2009.
  2. 1 2 3 "A Proper Hog Call." arkansasrazorbacks.com 18 July 2008. Retrieved on February 11, 2009.
  3. 1 2 "Calling the Hogs." Website. Archived 2009-11-17 at the Wayback Machine University of Arkansas Alumni Association. Retrieved on February 11, 2009.
  4. "A Proper Hog Call" Arkansas Razorbacks Official Athletics Website. Retrieved on October 13, 2016.