University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff

Last updated
University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff Legacy Seal.svg
Type Public, HBCU
Established1873
Chancellor Laurence B. Alexander
Students2,821 [1]
Location, ,
United States

34°14′32″N92°01′13″W / 34.242273°N 92.020347°W / 34.242273; -92.020347 Coordinates: 34°14′32″N92°01′13″W / 34.242273°N 92.020347°W / 34.242273; -92.020347
Campus Urban
Colors Black and Gold [2]
         
Athletics NCAA Division I – (FCS)
Nickname UAPB, The Yard
Affiliations Southwestern Athletic Conference
Mascot Golden Lions/Lady Lions
Website www.uapb.edu
University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff logo.svg

The University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff (UAPB) is a public historically black university located in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, United States. Founded in 1873, the second oldest public institution in the state of Arkansas. UAPB is a member-school of the University of Arkansas System and Thurgood Marshall College Fund.

Historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) are institutions of higher education in the United States that were established before the Civil Rights Act of 1964 with the intention of primarily serving the African-American community. This was because the overwhelming majority of predominantly white institutions of higher-learning disqualified African Americans from enrollment during segregation. From the time of slavery in the 19th century through to the second half of the 20th century, majority schools in the Southern United States prohibited all African Americans from attending, while historic schools in other parts of the country regularly employed quotas to limit admissions of blacks.

Pine Bluff, Arkansas City in Arkansas, United States

Pine Bluff is the tenth-largest city in the state of Arkansas and the county seat of Jefferson County. It is the principal city of the Pine Bluff Metropolitan Statistical Area and part of the Little Rock-North Little Rock-Pine Bluff Combined Statistical Area. The population of the city was 49,083 in the 2010 Census with 2017 estimates showing a decline to 42,984.

Arkansas State of the United States of America

Arkansas is a state in the southern region of the United States, home to over 3 million people as of 2018. Its name is of Siouan derivation from the language of the Osage denoting their related kin, the Quapaw Indians. The state's diverse geography ranges from the mountainous regions of the Ozark and the Ouachita Mountains, which make up the U.S. Interior Highlands, to the densely forested land in the south known as the Arkansas Timberlands, to the eastern lowlands along the Mississippi River and the Arkansas Delta.

Contents

History

The University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff was authorized in 1873 by the Reconstruction-era legislature as the Branch Normal College and opened in 1875 with Joseph Carter Corbin principal. A historically black college, it was nominally part of the "normal" (education) department of Arkansas Industrial University, later the University of Arkansas. It was operated separately as part of a compromise to get a college for black students, as the state maintained racial segregation well into the 20th century. It later was designated as a land-grant college under the 1890 federal amendments to Morrill Land-Grant Acts. As Congress had originally established the land grant colleges to provide education to all qualified students in a state, in 1890 it required states maintaining segregated systems to establish a separate land-grant university for blacks as well as whites.

Joseph Carter Corbin

Joseph Carter Corbin was an educator from Ohio and Arkansas. He was a founder and the first principal at the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff from 1875 until 1902. Before the end of slavery, he was a journalist, teacher, and conductor on the Underground Railroad in Ohio and Kentucky. After the American Civil War (1861-1865) ended slavery, he moved to Arkansas and then to Missouri where he continued to teach. From 1873 to 1874 he was superintendent of public schools in Arkansas. He ended his career in education spending a decade as principal of Merrill High School in Pine Bluff.

University of Arkansas Public research university in Fayetteville, Arkansas, USA

The University of Arkansas is a public land-grant, research university in Fayetteville, Arkansas. It is the flagship campus of the University of Arkansas System and the largest, best-known university in the state. Founded as Arkansas Industrial University in 1871, its present name was adopted in 1899 and classes were first held on January 22, 1872. It is noted for its strong architecture, agriculture, business, communication disorders, creative writing, history, law, and Middle Eastern studies programs.

Racial segregation separation of humans

Racial segregation is the systemic separation of people into racial or other ethnic groups in daily life. It may apply to activities such as eating in a restaurant, drinking from a water fountain, using a public toilet, attending school, going to the movies, riding on a bus, or in the rental or purchase of a home or of hotel rooms. Segregation is defined by the European Commission against Racism and Intolerance as "the act by which a person separates other persons on the basis of one of the enumerated grounds without an objective and reasonable justification, in conformity with the proposed definition of discrimination. As a result, the voluntary act of separating oneself from other people on the basis of one of the enumerated grounds does not constitute segregation". According to the UN Forum on Minority Issues, "The creation and development of classes and schools providing education in minority languages should not be considered impermissible segregation, if the assignment to such classes and schools is of a voluntary nature".

In 1927, the school severed its ties with the University of Arkansas and became Arkansas Agricultural, Mechanical & Normal College (Arkansas AM&N). It moved to its current campus location in 1929. Nearly 50 years later, in 1972, Arkansas AM&N re-joined what is now the University of Arkansas System. As a full-fledged campus with graduate study departments, it gained its current name and university status in the process.

University of Arkansas System

The University of Arkansas System comprises six campuses within the state of Arkansas; a medical school; two law schools; a unique graduate school focused on public service; a HBCU, statewide research, service and educational units for agriculture, criminal justice and archeology; and several community colleges. Over 50,000 students are enrolled in over 188 undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs.

Since 1988, the university has gained recognition as a leading research institution in aquaculture studies, offering the state's only comprehensive program in this field. It supports a growing regional industry throughout the Mid-South (according to the school, aquaculture is a $167 million industry in Arkansas alone and worth approximately $1.2 billion in the Mississippi Delta region). Recently the program was enhanced by the addition of an Aquaculture/Fisheries PhD program.

Aquaculture Farming of aquatic organisms

Aquaculture, also known as aquafarming, is the farming of fish, crustaceans, molluscs, aquatic plants, algae, and other organisms. Aquaculture involves cultivating freshwater and saltwater populations under controlled conditions, and can be contrasted with commercial fishing, which is the harvesting of wild fish. Mariculture refers to aquaculture practiced in marine environments and in underwater habitats.

Mississippi Delta northwest section of the U.S. state of Mississippi that lies between the Mississippi and Yazoo rivers

The Mississippi Delta, also known as the Yazoo-Mississippi Delta, is the distinctive northwest section of the U.S. state of Mississippi which lies between the Mississippi and Yazoo Rivers. The region has been called "The Most Southern Place on Earth", because of its unique racial, cultural, and economic history. It is 200 miles (320 km) long and 87 miles (140 km) across at its widest point, encompassing about 4,415,000 acres (17,870 km2), or, almost 7,000 square miles of alluvial floodplain. Originally covered in hardwood forest across the bottomlands, it was developed as one of the richest cotton-growing areas in the nation before the American Civil War (1861–1865). The region attracted many speculators who developed land along the riverfronts for cotton plantations; they became wealthy planters dependent on the labor of black slaves, who comprised the vast majority of the population in these counties well before the Civil War, often twice the number of whites.

The University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff is the oldest and largest HBCU in Arkansas.

Academics

UAPB is divided into eight academic divisions. [3]

UAPB is fully accredited by the Higher Learning Commission. [4]

Higher Learning Commission university accreditation organization in the U.S.A.

The Higher Learning Commission (HLC) is an organization tasked with the regional accreditation responsibilities for post-secondary education institutions in the central United States. The Higher Learning Commission oversees the accreditation of degree-granting colleges and universities in nineteen mostly Midwestern and South-Central states, namely Arkansas, Arizona, Colorado, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, New Mexico, South Dakota, Wisconsin, West Virginia, and Wyoming. The headquarters of the organization is based in Chicago, Illinois.

UAPB has the only comprehensive aquaculture program in Arkansas, established to help support the state's $167 million aquaculture industry. [5]

Since UAPB does not offer engineering degrees, it has a partnership with the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville (UA) that allow qualified students to spend three years to complete an engineering related bachelor's degree at UAPB then automatic admissions into UA to complete their engineering bachelor's degree in two years. Students who successfully complete the UAPB-UA engineering program will have two bachelor's degrees in approximately five years. [6]

University Museum And Cultural Center

The University Museum And Cultural Center on the campus of UAPB contains photographs, catalogs, yearbooks, letters, artifacts, portraits and other ephemera that document the lives and culture of African-Americans who helped shaped the history of UAPB and the Arkansas Delta. It is the only museum of its kind in Arkansas and was established in 2005. [7] [8] [9]

Athletics

UAPB's colors are black and gold and their nickname is the Golden Lions.

A UAPB player running the football in 2014 Web1 A&M-vs-UAPB8672.jpg
A UAPB player running the football in 2014

Arkansas–Pine Bluff's sports teams have participated in NCAA Division I in the Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC) since re-joining the conference in 1998, and competes in the Football Championship Subdivision (formerly I-AA) for football. Home football games are held at Golden Lion Stadium. Men's sports also include baseball, basketball, cross country, golf, tennis and track & field; while women's sports include basketball, cross country, soccer, softball, tennis, track & field and volleyball.

The Lions participated in the SWAC Championship Game for the first time in 2006 after recording a 7–2 conference record. The Alabama A&M Bulldogs defeated the Lions (22–13) in the championship game. The Lions finished that season with an overall record of 8–4. [10]

The Lions won the SWAC Championship on December 8, 2012 against Jackson State in Birmingham, Alabama. UAPB finished the 2012 season 10-2 and are the 2012 Southwestern Athletic Conference champions.

In 2009–2010, for the first time in school history, the women's soccer team won the SWAC tournament and made it to the NCAA tournament for the first time ever. Also the men's basketball team received an automatic bid to the NCAA tournament as champions of the SWAC. The Golden Lions won the opening round game against Winthrop and were awarded the #16 seed in the South Region. The team was eliminated from the tournament in the following round by Duke who ultimately became the NCAA Champions.

Student life

Residential life

The University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff houses over 1,000 students on campus. Hunt Hall houses male students. The Harrold Complex, consisting of four halls, Johnson, Copeland, Fischer, and Stevens, is for females. Freshman males are assigned to Johnson and Copeland.

Built in 1955, Hunt Hall was named in memory of Silas Hunt, the first black law student at the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville. Hunt Hall has two floors and houses 134 male students.

Built in 1964, the Harrold Complex was named in memory of Norma E. Harrold, former Dean of Women. It has four halls and houses a total of 512 male and female students. Johnson Hall was named in honor of Nettie E. Johnson, a graduate of the class of 1903; Copeland Hall was named in memory of Ernestine Inez Copeland; Fischer Hall was named in memory of Rubye G. Fischer, a former principal of the J.C. Corbin Laboratory School on campus; and Stevens Hall was named for the late Maggie R. Stevens, a former counselor at Branch Normal College.

The Johnny B. Johnson Complex, JBJ, can house 288 students.

Built in 1991, the Complex was named in honor of Dr. Johnny B. Johnson, former Chancellor of the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff. JBJ has nine buildings and houses a total of 288 male and female students.

The newest residence hall is the new Delta Housing Complex. Built in 2003, this suite-style complex has 104 private rooms and 140 double rooms; it houses 388 students.[ dubious ]

Marching band

M4 marching in a Shreveport, Louisiana parade in 2013 UAPB Band, 2013 Krewe of Harambee MLK Day Mardi Gras Parade 001.jpg
M4 marching in a Shreveport, Louisiana parade in 2013

In 2008, UAPB's band known as the Marching Musical Machine of the Mid-South (M4), made their debut appearance at the Honda Battle of the Bands. In 2009, M4 was selected to participate in the United States Presidential Inaugural Parade. [11]

M4 is one of the top three largest collegiate marching bands in Arkansas and is accompanied by two auxiliaries. The dance auxiliary is known as the "Golden Girls" and the flag auxiliary known as the "24K Golden Silks."

M4 is a five drum major led marching band.

Student organizations

There are over 70 active student organizations on campus. [12] All active student organizations are registered through the Division of Student Affairs.

Fraternities and sororities

Eight of the nine National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) fraternities and sororities are represented on campus. Less than five percent of the undergraduate student body are represented in the NPHC. The University also hosts four of the seven fraternity and sorority organizations part of the National Interfraternity Music Council (NIMC). These organizations are:

OrganizationSymbolChapterChapter Symbol
Alpha Kappa Alpha ΑΚΑAlpha RhoAP
Alpha Phi Alpha ΑΦΑGamma DeltaΓΔ
Delta Sigma Theta ΔΣΘDelta EtaΔΗ
Kappa Alpha Psi ΚΑΨGamma SigmaΓΣ
Omega Psi Phi ΩΨΦTau SigmaΤΣ
Phi Beta Sigma ΦΒΣBeta ThetaΒΘ
Sigma Gamma Rho ΣΓΡAlpha ChiΑΧ
Zeta Phi Beta ΖΦΒBeta BetaBB
Phi Mu Alpha ΦMΑRho Gamma
Kappa Kappa Psi ΚΚΨEpsilon Chi
Tau Beta Sigma TBΣDelta PiΔΠ
Sigma Alpha Iota ΣΑILambda NuΛN

Notable alumni

NameClass yearNotabilityReference(s)
Martha S. Lewis 1944government official in New York city and state
Chris Mercer 1946first African-American deputy state prosecutor in the south
Danny K. Davis 1961U.S. Representative for 7th Congressional District in Illinois
Samuel L. Kountz 1952performed the first successful Kidney transplant between humans who were not identical twins
Jamil Nasser 1955jazz musician, bassist
Tevester Anderson 1962retired head basketball coach for Jackson State University and Murray State University
Frank Burgess 1957professional basketball player; later an attorney and U.S. federal judge for the Western District of Washington
Burgess only attended one year before enlisting in the U.S. Air Force. After serving a four-year tour, he transferred to Gonzaga University, where he eventually earned bachelor's and law degrees.
Joe Gardner 1966jazz musician, trumpet
John Stubblefield 1967jazz musician, sax, recording artist
James Leary 1968jazz/classical musician, bass, Sammy Davis, Jr., Count Basie Orchestra, Oakland Symphony
L. C. Greenwood 1969football player; former Pittsburgh Steelers defensive lineman, a member of the famous Steel Curtain defense
Terron Armstead professional football player currently with the New Orleans Saints
Cleo Miller 1973former professional football player
Ivory Lee Brown 1991football player
Smokie Norful 1995Pastor, Grammy award winning gospel singer and pianist
Chris Akins 1999former NFL defensive back
Big Tuck rapper
Greg Briggs NFL player
Greg Wesley 2000former professional football player
Dante Wesley 2002former professional football player
Monk Williams professional football player
Courtney Van Buren 2003former professional football player
Charles Ali 2007former professional football player
Martell Mallett Canadian football player currently with the Calgary Stampeders
Don Zimmerman former professional football player

See also

Related Research Articles

Southwestern Athletic Conference Collegiate athletic conference made up of historically black colleges and universities

The Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC) is a collegiate athletic conference headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama, which is made up of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in the Southern United States. It participates in the NCAA's Division I for all sports; in football, it participates in the Football Championship Subdivision (FCS), formerly referred to as Division I-AA.

Also known as the Delta Classic, The Delta Classic 4 Literacy was a college football game held between historically black colleges. It was held annually in Little Rock, Arkansas from 2006 to 2012.

George Ivory is the current head men's basketball coach at the University of Arkansas-Pine Bluff. He was appointed as head coach on March 27, 2008. Previously, Ivory was an assistant at Mississippi Valley State University, his alma mater.

Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions football

The UAPB Golden Lions are the college football team representing the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff. The Golden Lions play in NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) as a member of the Southwestern Athletic Conference.

Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions mens basketball

The Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions men's basketball team is the men's basketball team that represents the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, United States. The school's team currently competes in the Southwestern Athletic Conference and led the conference in average home attendance for six consecutive years (2009–2015).

Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions baseball

The Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions baseball team is a varsity intercollegiate athletic team of the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, United States. The team is a member of the Southwestern Athletic Conference, which is part of the National Collegiate Athletic Association's Division I. The team plays its home games at the Torii Hunter Baseball/Softball Complex in Pine Bluff, Arkansas. The Golden Lions are coached by Carlos James.

2012 Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions football team

The 2012 Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions football team represented the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff in the 2012 NCAA Division I FCS football season. The Golden Lions were led by fifth year head coach Monte Coleman and played their home games at Golden Lion Stadium as a member of the West Division of the Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC). They finished with an overall record of ten wins and two losses and as SWAC champions after they defeated Jackson State in the SWAC Championship Game.

2012–13 Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions mens basketball team

The 2012–13 Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions men's basketball team represented the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff during the 2012–13 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The Golden Lions, led by fifth year head coach George Ivory, played their home games at the K. L. Johnson Complex and were members of the Southwestern Athletic Conference. Due to low APR scores, the Golden Lions were ineligible for post season play, including the SWAC Tournament. They finished the season 16–14, 15–3 in SWAC play to finish in a tie for second place with Southern.

2013 Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions football team

The 2013 Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions football team represents the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff in the 2013 NCAA Division I FCS football season. The Golden Lions are led by sixth year head coach Monte Coleman and play their home games at Golden Lion Stadium as a member of the West Division of the Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC). They came into the 2013 season as the defending SWAC Champions.

Carlos James is an American college baseball coach, currently serving as head coach of the Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions baseball program. He was named to that position prior to the 2011 NCAA Division I baseball season.

2013–14 Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions mens basketball team

The 2013–14 Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions men's basketball team represented the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff during the 2013–14 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The Golden Lions, led by sixth year head coach George Ivory, played their home games at the K. L. Johnson Complex and were members of the Southwestern Athletic Conference. They finished the season 13–18, 11–7 in SWAC play to finish in fourth place. They lost in the quarterfinals of the SWAC Tournament to Alabama A&M.

Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions and Golden Lady Lions

The Arkansas-Pine Bluff Golden Lions and Lady Lions represent the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff in Pine Bluff, Arkansas in intercollegiate athletics. They field fourteen teams including men and women's basketball, cross country, tennis, and track and field; women's-only softball, volleyball, and soccer; and men's-only baseball, football, and golf. The Golden Lions and Lady Lions compete in NCAA Division I and are members of the Southwestern Athletic Conference.

2014–15 Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions mens basketball team

The 2014–15 Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions men's basketball team represented the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff during the 2014–15 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The Golden Lions, led by seventh year head coach George Ivory, played their home games at the K. L. Johnson Complex and were members of the Southwestern Athletic Conference. They finished the season 12–20, 9–9 in SWAC play to finish in a tie for fifth place. The team did not participate in the SWAC Tournament due to a postseason ban issued by the NCAA.

2015 Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions football team

The 2015 Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions football team represented the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff in the 2015 NCAA Division I FCS football season. The Golden Lions were led by eighth-year head coach Monte Coleman and played their home games at Golden Lion Stadium as a member of the West Division of the Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC). They finished the season 2–9, 1–8 in SWAC play to finish in last place in the West Division.

2015–16 Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions mens basketball team

The 2015–16 Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions men's basketball team represented the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff during the 2015–16 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The Golden Lions, led by eighth year head coach George Ivory, played their home games at the K. L. Johnson Complex and were members of the Southwestern Athletic Conference. The Golden Lions finished the season with an 8–25 overall record, 6–12 in conference and finished in a three-way tie for seventh place. They lost to Alabama A&M in the first round of the SWAC Tournament.

2016–17 Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions mens basketball team

The 2016–17 Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions men's basketball team represented the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff during the 2016–17 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The Golden Lions, led by ninth-year head coach George Ivory, played their home games at the K. L. Johnson Complex as members of the Southwestern Athletic Conference. They finished the season 7–25, 6–12 in SWAC play to finish in a tie for eighth place. They did not qualify for the SWAC Tournament.

2017 Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions football team

The 2017 Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions football team represented the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff in the 2017 NCAA Division I FCS football season. The Golden Lions were led by 10th-year head coach Monte Coleman and played their home games at Golden Lion Stadium in Pine Bluff, Arkansas as members of the West Division of the Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC). The Golden Lions finished the season 2–9, 1–6 in SWAC play to finish in last place in the West Division.

2017–18 Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions mens basketball team

The 2017–18 Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions men's basketball team represented the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff during the 2017–18 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The Golden Lions, led by 10th-year head coach George Ivory, played their home games at the K. L. Johnson Complex as members of the Southwestern Athletic Conference. They finished the season 14–21, 12–6 in SWAC play to finish in a three-way tie for second place. Due to Grambling State's Academic Progress Rate violations and subsequent postseason ineligibility, the Golden Lions received the No. 1 seed in the SWAC Tournament. They defeated Mississippi Valley State and Southern before losing to Texas Southern in the tournament championship.

2018–19 Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions mens basketball team

The 2018–19 Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions men's basketball team represents the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff during the 2018–19 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. The Golden Lions, led by 11th-year head coach George Ivory, play their home games at the K. L. Johnson Complex as members of the Southwestern Athletic Conference.

2019 Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions football team

The 2019 Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions football team represents the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff in the 2019 NCAA Division I FCS football season. The Golden Lions are led by second-year head coach Cedric Thomas and play their home games at Golden Lion Stadium in Pine Bluff, Arkansas as members of the West Division of the Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC).

References

  1. "UAPB Freshman Enrollment Rises 11%". 17 September 2016.
  2. "Branding Standards". uapb.edu.
  3. "Academics - University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff". uapb.edu.
  4. "About UAPB". 1 October 2009.
  5. http://aqfi.uaex.edu/
  6. "University of Arkansas Pine Bluff - College of Engineering - University of Arkansas". engineering.uark.edu.
  7. "University Museum and Cultural Center". Arkansas Tourism Official Site.
  8. http://legacy.thv11.com/story/news/education/2015/02/12/museum-at-uapb-preserves-the-history-of-the-delta/23291043/
  9. "A Look Back In Time: UAPB Museum - Only In Arkansas". 9 June 2015.
  10. "ESPN – Arkansas–Pine Bluff Golden Lions News, Schedule, Players, Stats, Video – College Football".
  11. "For a University Band, A Fast Paced March to the Inaugural Parade". The Chronicle of Higher Education.
  12. "Prairie View A&M Panther Athletics - Football vs Grambling State on 9/26/2015". pvpanthers.com.