Coahoma Community College

Last updated
Coahoma Community College
Former names
Coahoma County Agricultural High School
Coahoma Junior College and Agricultural High School
Type Public historically black community college
Established1949;73 years ago (1949)
Academic affiliation
Space-grant
President Valmadge Towner
Students1,612 (2020) [1]
Location,
United States

34°15′21″N90°34′11″W / 34.25583°N 90.56972°W / 34.25583; -90.56972 Coordinates: 34°15′21″N90°34′11″W / 34.25583°N 90.56972°W / 34.25583; -90.56972
CampusRural, 99 acres (400,000 m2)
Colors Maroon and white [2]
  
Nickname Tigers
Sporting affiliations
NJCAA, MACCC
Website www.coahomacc.edu

Coahoma Community College (CCC) is a public historically black community college in Coahoma County, Mississippi. The college was founded in 1949 and is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. It offers associate degree and certificate programs in more than 70 areas of focus. [1] [3]

Contents

The 99-acre (400,000 m2) campus lies in an agrarian setting along Clarksdale-Friars Point Road near the Mississippi River and serves Coahoma, Bolivar, Quitman, Tallahatchie, and Tunica counties. [3]

CCC's athletic teams, the Tigers, compete in the Mississippi Association of Community Colleges Conference (MACCC) of the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA). [4] [5] [6]

History

Coahoma Community College was founded in Coahoma County in 1949 as an extension of Coahoma Agricultural High School (1924), Mississippi's first agricultural high school for black students. Upon the establishment of the college, the high school was renamed Coahoma Junior College and Agricultural High School. The college initially offered courses to black students under the separate but equal doctrine. It was the first community college in Mississippi for black students. [7] [8]

Before becoming affiliated with Mississippi's public junior colleges system in its second year of operation, CCC was fully-funded by Coahoma County. [7]

In 1989, the Board of Trustees and State Board for Community and Junior Colleges approved renaming the junior college to Coahoma Community College. [9]

In 1995, the Mississippi legislature granted the college its own district consisting of Bolivar, Coahoma, Quitman, Tallahatchie, and Tunica Counties. [9]

Superintendents and presidents

Prior to 1945, the college was led by a superintendent. Superintendents and presidents of the college have included: [10]

Administration and organization

CCC operates under four divisions: Academic, Career & Technical Education, Health Sciences and Workforce Development. [10] [11]

A typical academic year contains two 15-week terms during the fall (August–December) and spring (January–May). Within the full terms are two accelerated eight-week terms each fall and spring, as well as a two-week winter session (December–January).The full summer term is eight weeks long (May–July) and contains two accelerated four-week terms. An academic year begins on the first day of the fall term and ends on the last day of the summer term. [10] [12]

CCC's endowment had a market value of approximately $2.77 million in the fiscal year that ended in 2019. [13]

Academics

CCC has an open admissions policy. [1]

The college offers dual enrollment programs to local high school students. [14] In addition to its associate and certificate degree programs, CCC offers adult education courses as well as non-credit continuing education and workforce development courses. [15] [16]

CCC has transfer agreements with every public four-year institution in Mississippi. The agreements allow students to automatically transfer after completing an associate degree at CCC. [17]

CCC is a TRIO program participant through its Educational Talent Search program, which is a government-funded program that supports low-income and first-generation college students in achieving their postsecondary, career and economic goals. The program offers educational support, high school and college entry guidance and academic advising to local students in grades 7 through 12. [18] [19]

Student life

Student body

As of fall 2020, CCC's student body consisted of 1,612 students. There were 78 percent full time and 22 percent part time students. [1]

Demographics of student body in fall 2020 [1]
Full and Part Time StudentsU.S. Census [lower-alpha 1] [20]
International1%N/A
Multiracial American 0%2.8%
Black/African American 92%13.4%
American Indian and Alaska Native 0%1.3%
Asian 0%5.9%
Non-Hispanic White American 6%60.1%
Hispanic/Latino American 1%18.5%
Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander 0%0.2%
Other/Unknown0%N/A

Organizations

More than 30 student clubs and organizations operate at CCC, including student government, special interest and service organizations. [21]

CCC holds '"Mr. Coahoma Community College" and "Miss Coahoma Community College", annual beauty pageants that honor a select group of current, high-achieving students within the college's student government association. [22]

Athletics

The CCC athletic association chairs six varsity athletic programs. The teams are collectively known as the Tigers. They belong to the Mississippi Association of Community Colleges Conference and Region 23 of the National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA). Men's sports include basketball, baseball and football. Women's sports include basketball and softball. CCC also chairs a co-ed track & field team. Although it is not affiliated with the NJCAA, CCC also chairs a co-ed cheerleading squad. [6] [5]

Notable alumni

Notes

  1. People who identify as Hispanic/Latino are included in applicable race categories.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 "College Navigator - Coahoma Community College". National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved 21 December 2021.
  2. "CCC Brand". Coahoma Community College. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  3. 1 2 "Programs of Study". Coahoma Community College. Retrieved 23 December 2021.
  4. "MACCC announces men's and women's basketball players of the week" . Retrieved 21 December 2021.
  5. 1 2 "Organization of NJCAA Regions". NJCAA. Retrieved 21 December 2021.
  6. 1 2 "Official Athletics Website". Coahoma Community College. Retrieved 21 December 2021.
  7. 1 2 Historically Black Colleges and Universities Fact Book: Junior & community colleges. The Division. 1983. p. 3. Retrieved 21 December 2021.
  8. Ownby, Ted; Wilson, Charles Reagan; Abadie, Ann J.; Lindsey, Odie; Thomas, James G. Jr. (25 May 2017). The Mississippi Encyclopedia. Univ. Press of Mississippi. pp. 256–257. ISBN   978-1-4968-1159-2 . Retrieved 21 December 2021.
  9. 1 2 "History". Coahoma Community College. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  10. 1 2 3 "Coahoma Community College 2019-2021 College Catalog" (PDF). Coahoma Community College. Retrieved 21 December 2021.
  11. "Home". Coahoma Community College. Retrieved 23 December 2021.
  12. "Academic Calendar". Coahoma Community College. Retrieved 23 December 2021.
  13. "Coahoma Community College". Data USA. Retrieved 21 December 2021.
  14. "Dual Enrollment". Coahoma Community College. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  15. "Adult Education - CCC Workforce Development". Coahoma Community College. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  16. "Continuing Education Units (CEUs)". Coahoma Community College. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  17. "Articulation Agreement". Coahoma Community College. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  18. "Educational Talent Search". Coahoma Community College. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  19. "$1.3 million grant renews CCC Talent Search program". Coahoma Community College.
  20. "U.S. Census Bureau QuickFacts: United States". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 24 August 2021.
  21. "Clubs & Organizations". Coahoma Community College. Retrieved 23 December 2021.
  22. "Coahoma Community College Student Activities Handbook" (PDF). Coahoma Community College. Retrieved 23 December 2021.
  23. Jordan, Jonah (25 April 2020). "Three former Tigers selected in 2020 NFL Draft". Memphis Local, Sports, Business & Food News | Daily Memphian. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  24. "Former Stetson star Earnest Killum dies at 72". Daytona Beach News-Journal Online. 12 June 2020. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  25. "The Voter's Self Defense System". Vote Smart. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  26. "Timothy Pollard". Mississippi Association of Community Colleges Conference Athletics.
  27. "Mighty Tigers Bounce Back at Homecoming 2020". Coahoma Community College Athletics. Retrieved 3 January 2022.
  28. Jhabvala, Nicki (17 February 2020). "'I never gave up trying to play': Why Davion Taylor is one of the most intriguing NFL Draft prospects". The Athletic. Retrieved 3 January 2022.