Thurgood Marshall College Fund

Last updated
Thurgood Marshall College Fund
AbbreviationTMCF
Founded1987
FounderN. Joyce Payne
TypeEducational non-profit
Headquarters901 F Street NW, Suite 300
Washington, D.C., US
Region served
United States
Membership
47 member-schools
Chairman
Charles Merinoff
President & CEO
Harry L. Williams
Main organ
Board of Directors
Website www.tmcf.org

The Thurgood Marshall College Fund (TMCF) is an American non-profit organization that supports and represents nearly 300,000 students attending its 47 member-schools that include public historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), medical schools, and law schools. The organization is named after the Supreme Court's first African-American Justice, Thurgood Marshall. [1] [2] [3]

Contents

History

The organization was established in 1987, under the leadership of Dr. N. Joyce Payne in cooperation with Miller Brewing Company, Sony Music, the NBA, Reebok and the American Association of State Colleges and Universities to institutionally support public HBCUs. It underwent a name change in 2006 from the Thurgood Marshall Scholarship Fund to the Thurgood Marshall College Fund. [4]

TMCF has championed higher education at public historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and has grown from a small organization providing scholarships for public HBCUs, raising over $300 million to date for programmatic support, capacity building support, and scholarships for its member-schools and the students matriculating on the campuses. [5]

Its mission differs from that of the United Negro College Fund, which supported approximately 65,000 students at 900 colleges and universities with approximately $113 million in grants and scholarships in 2015 alone, while the Thurgood Marshall College fund only supports 47 schools; it is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt, charitable organization, which means it does not pay taxes on its income. [6]

TMCF was granted $50 million in 2015 by Apple, [7] $26.5 million in 2017 by the Charles Koch Foundation and Koch Industries, [8] and $6 million by The Boeing Company in 2018. [9] [10]

Acquisitions

In 2013, TMCF acquired the Opportunity Funding Corporation (OFC), merging the two organizations with TMCF becoming the parent organization. Both organizations share a similar mission of providing service to the HBCU community, particularly in the area of talent identification. While continuing its efforts to enhance the entrepreneurship curriculum within public and private HBCUs, OFC will identify the most promising future entrepreneurs and introduce them to potential investors and very successful entrepreneurs. [11] [12]

Leadership

Member-Schools Listing [15]

Member-School Breakdown: [16]

SchoolTypeCityStateEstablishedEndowmentStudentsParent institutionSporting affiliations
Alabama A&M University HBCU Normal Alabama 1875$48.0 million (2019)6,172 (Fall 2019) NCAA Division I, FCSSWAC
Alabama State University HBCU Montgomery Alabama 1867$94.5 million (2019)4,190 (Fall 2019) NCAA Division I, FCSSWAC
Albany State University HBCU Albany Georgia 1903$3.21 million (2019)6,122 (Spring 2021) University System of Georgia NCAA Division II, SIAC
Alcorn State University HBCU Lorman Mississippi 1871$20.2 million (2019)3,523 (Fall 2019) NCAA Division I, FCSSWAC
Bluefield State College HBCU Bluefield West Virginia 1895$3.51 million (2019)1,241 (Fall 2019) NCAA Division II, Independent / ECAC
Bowie State University HBCU Bowie Maryland 1865$10.5 million (2019)6,171 (Fall 2019) University System of Maryland NCAA Division II, CIAA
Central State University HBCU Wilberforce Ohio 1887$5.93 million (2019)2,033 (Fall 2019) University System of Ohio NCAA Division II, SIAC
Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science GRAD Los Angeles California 1966$94.3 million (2019)748 (Fall 2019) Western Association of Schools and Colleges n/a
Cheyney University of Pennsylvania HBCU Cheyney Pennsylvania 1837$1.47 million (2019)627 (2020–21) Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education Independent
Chicago State University PBI Chicago Illinois 1867$5.16 million (2019)2,620 (Fall 2021) NCAA Division I, Independent
Coppin State University HBCU Baltimore Maryland 1900$11.9 million (2019)2,724 (2019–20) University System of Maryland NCAA Division I, FCS - MEAC
Delaware State University HBCU Dover Delaware 1891$22.3 million (2019)5,649 NCAA Division I, FCS - MEAC
Elizabeth City State University HBCU Elizabeth City North Carolina 1891$12.3 million (2019)2,054 University of North Carolina System NCAA Division II, CIAA
Fayetteville State University HBCU Fayetteville North Carolina 1867$24.8 million (2020)6,551 (Fall 2019) University of North Carolina System NCAA Division II, CIAA
Florida A&M University HBCU Tallahassee Florida 1887$95.6 million (2020)9,179 (Fall 2020) State University System of Florida NCAA Division I, FCSSWAC
Florida A&M University College of Law LAW Tallahassee Florida 1949529 Florida A&M University n/a
Fort Valley State University HBCU Fort Valley Georgia 1895$6.66 million (2019)2,306 (Fall 2020) University System of Georgia NCAA Division II, SIAC
Grambling State University HBCU Grambling Louisiana 1901$7.25 million (2019)5,232 (Fall 2019) University of Louisiana System NCAA Division I, FCSSWAC
Harris–Stowe State University HBCU St. Louis Missouri 1857$1.4 million (2019)1,630 (Fall 2019) NAIA, AMC
Howard University HBCU Washington District of Columbia 1867$712.4 million (2020)12,065 (Fall 2021) NCAA Division I, FCSMEAC
Howard University College of Medicine MED Washington District of Columbia 1868 Howard University n/a
Howard University School of Law LAW Washington District of Columbia 1869407 Howard University n/a
Jackson State University HBCU Jackson Mississippi 1877$60 million (2019)7,020 (fall 2019) NCAA Division I, FCSSWAC
Kentucky State University HBCU Frankfort Kentucky 1886$18.5 million (2019)2,220 (Fall 2020) NCAA Division II, SIAC
Langston University HBCU Langston Oklahoma 1897$50.8 million (2019)2,190 (Fall 2019) Oklahoma State System, OSU/A&M Board of Regents NAIA, RRAC
Lincoln University HBCU Jefferson City Missouri 1866$1.65 million (2019)2,436 (Fall 2019) NCAA Division II, MIAA
Lincoln University HBCU Chester County Pennsylvania 1854$44.1 million (2019)2,241 (2019) NCAA Division II, CIAA
Medgar Evers College PBI New York New York 1970$528k (2019)7,156 City University of New York NCAA Division III, CUNYAC
Mississippi Valley State University HBCU Mississippi Valley State Mississippi 1950$2.69 million (2019)2,147 (Fall 2019) NCAA Division I, FCSSWAC
Morgan State University HBCU Baltimore Maryland 1867$41.4 million (2020)7,763 (Fall 2019) NCAA Division I, FCSMEAC
Norfolk State University HBCU Norfolk Virginia 1935$24.5 million (2019)5,616 (Fall 2019) Virginia High-Tech Partnership NCAA Division I, FCSMEAC
North Carolina A&T State University HBCU Greensboro North Carolina 1891$178 million (2022)13,322 (Fall 2021) University of North Carolina System NCAA Division I, FCSBig South
North Carolina Central University HBCU Durham North Carolina 1910$39.5 million (2019)8,207 (Fall 2018) University of North Carolina System NCAA Division I, FCSMEAC
North Carolina Central University School of Law LAW Durham North Carolina 1939364 (full-time), 212 (part-time) North Carolina Central University n/a
Prairie View A&M University HBCU Prairie View Texas 1876$84.3 million (2019)9,350 (Fall 2021) Texas A&M University System NCAA Division I, FCSSWAC
Savannah State University HBCU Savannah Georgia 1890$9.05 million (2019)3,688 (Fall 2019) University System of Georgia NCAA Division II, SIAC
South Carolina State University HBCU Orangeburg South Carolina 1896$10.8 million (2019)2,479 (Fall 2019) NCAA Division I, FCSMEAC
Southern University HBCU Baton Rouge Louisiana 1880$9.58 million (2019)7,091 (Fall 2019) Southern University System NCAA Division I, FCSSWAC
Southern University Law Center LAW Baton Rouge Louisiana 1947$2.0 million (2019)669 (Fall 2019) Southern University n/a
Southern University at New Orleans HBCU New Orleans Louisiana 1956$3.09 million (2019)2,309 (Fall 2019) Southern University System NAIA, GCAC
Southern University at Shreveport JUCO Shreveport Louisiana 1967$896k (2019)2,932 (Fall 2019) Southern University System NJCAA, LCCAC
Tennessee State University HBCU Nashville Tennessee 1912$63.0 million (2020)8,081 (Fall 2020) NCAA Division I, FCSOVC
Texas Southern University HBCU Houston Texas 1927$58.0 million (2019)7,524 (Fall 2021) NCAA Division I, FCSSWAC
Thurgood Marshall School of Law LAW Houston Texas 1946600 Texas Southern University n/a
Tuskegee University HBCU Tuskegee Alabama 1881$129.0 million (2019)2,877 (Fall 2019) NCAA Division II, SIAC
University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff HBCU Pine Bluff Arkansas 1873$3.81 million (2019)2,498 (Fall 2019) University of Arkansas System NCAA Division I, FCSSWAC
University of Maryland Eastern Shore HBCU Princess Anne Maryland 1886$29.7 million (2019)2,886 (Fall 2019) University System of Maryland NCAA Division I, FCSMEAC
University of the District of Columbia HBCU Washington District of Columbia 1851$49.5 million (2019)4,199 (Fall 2019) NCAA Division II, ECC
David A. Clarke School of Law LAW Washington District of Columbia 1986253 (Fall 2019) University of the District of Columbia n/a
University of the Virgin Islands HBCU St. Croix,

St. Thomas, St. John

United States Virgin Islands 1962$66.9 million (2020)2,084 (Fall 2019) NAIAIndependent
Virginia State University HBCU Petersburg Virginia 1882$56.1 million (2020)4,365 (Fall 2019) Virginia High-Tech Partnership NCAA Division II, CIAA
West Virginia State University HBCU Institute West Virginia 1891$14.3 million (2019)4,120 (Fall 2019) NCAA Division II, MEC
Winston-Salem State University HBCU Winston-Salem North Carolina 1892$35.3 million (2019)5,121 (Fall 2019) University of North Carolina System NCAA Division II, CIAA
York College PBI Jamaica, Queens New York 1966$2.0 million (2019)8,337 (Fall 2019) City University of New York NCAA Division III, CUNYAC

TMCF Partners [17]

Scholarships

K-12 Initiatives

Student Leadership and Talent Sourcing

Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Higher Education Research

Board of Directors

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  17. "Our Partners". Thurgood Marshall College Fund. Retrieved 2022-02-27.

Coordinates: 40°42′26″N74°00′27″W / 40.707295°N 74.007584°W / 40.707295; -74.007584