Baron Tredegar

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Statue of Godfrey Morgan, 1st Viscount Tredegar, at Cardiff First-Viscount-Tredegar-by-Aberdare-Blog.jpg
Statue of Godfrey Morgan, 1st Viscount Tredegar, at Cardiff

Baron Tredegar, of Tredegar in the County of Monmouth, was a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created in 1859 for the Welsh politician Sir Charles Morgan, 3rd Baronet, who had earlier represented Brecon in Parliament. His eldest son, Charles Rodney Morgan, sat as Member of Parliament for Brecon, but predeceased his father. Lord Tredegar was therefore succeeded by his second son, the second Baron.

Monmouthshire (historic) one of the thirteen historic counties of Wales

Monmouthshire, also known as the County of Monmouth, is one of thirteen historic counties of Wales and a former administrative county. It corresponds approximately to the present principal areas of Monmouthshire, Blaenau Gwent, Newport and Torfaen, and those parts of Caerphilly and Cardiff east of the Rhymney River.

The Peerage of the United Kingdom comprises most peerages created in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland after the Acts of Union in 1801, when it replaced the Peerage of Great Britain. New peers continued to be created in the Peerage of Ireland until 1898.

Wales Country in northwest Europe, part of the United Kingdom

Wales is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It is bordered by England to the east, the Irish Sea to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel to the south. It had a population in 2011 of 3,063,456 and has a total area of 20,779 km2 (8,023 sq mi). Wales has over 1,680 miles (2,700 km) of coastline and is largely mountainous with its higher peaks in the north and central areas, including Snowdon, its highest summit. The country lies within the north temperate zone and has a changeable, maritime climate.

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Barons Tredegar

Tredegar House Tredegar House 1 (16984431737).jpg
Tredegar House

Charles Morgan was a politician and soldier, and notably commanded a section of the Light Brigade at the Battle of Balaclava during the Crimean War. Godfrey was 22 and Captain in the 17th Lancers. His horse, Sir Briggs, also survived, and lived at Tredegar House until his death at the age of 28. He was buried with full military honours in the Cedar Garden at the House. The monument still stands there today.

Charge of the Light Brigade charge of British light cavalry led by Lord Cardigan against Russian forces

The Charge of the Light Brigade was a failed military action involving the British light cavalry led by Lord Cardigan against Russian forces during the Battle of Balaclava on 25 October 1854 in the Crimean War. British commander Lord Raglan had intended to send the Light Brigade to prevent the Russians from removing captured guns from overrun Turkish positions, a task for which the light cavalry were well-suited. However, there was miscommunication in the chain of command, and the Light Brigade was instead sent on a frontal assault against a different artillery battery, one well-prepared with excellent fields of defensive fire. The Light Brigade reached the battery under withering direct fire and scattered some of the gunners, but they were forced to retreat immediately, and the assault ended with very high British casualties and no decisive gains.

Battle of Balaclava battle of the Crimean War

The Battle of Balaclava, fought on 25 October 1854 during the Crimean War, was part of Siege of Sevastopol (1854–55) to capture the port and fortress of Sevastopol, Russia's principal naval base on the Black Sea. The engagement followed the earlier Allied victory in September at the Battle of the Alma, where the Russian General Menshikov had positioned his army in an attempt to stop the Allies progressing south towards their strategic goal. Alma was the first major encounter fought in the Crimean Peninsula since the Allied landings at Kalamita Bay on 14 September, and was a clear battlefield success; but a tardy pursuit by the Allies failed to gain a decisive victory, allowing the Russians to regroup, recover and prepare their defence.

Crimean War 1850s military conflict

The Crimean War was a military conflict fought from October 1853 to February 1856 in which the Russian Empire lost to an alliance of the Ottoman Empire, France, Britain and Sardinia. The immediate cause involved the rights of Christian minorities in the Holy Land, which was a part of the Ottoman Empire. The French promoted the rights of Roman Catholics, while Russia promoted those of the Eastern Orthodox Church. The longer-term causes involved the decline of the Ottoman Empire and the unwillingness of Britain and France to allow Russia to gain territory and power at Ottoman expense. It has widely been noted that the causes, in one case involving an argument over a key, have never revealed a "greater confusion of purpose", yet they led to a war noted for its "notoriously incompetent international butchery".

In 1905 he was created Viscount Tredegar, of Tredegar in the County of Monmouth, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. He never married and the viscountcy became extinct on his death in 1913. He was succeeded in the baronetcy and barony by his nephew, Courtenay, the third Baron. He was the eldest son of the Hon. Frederick Courtenay Morgan, third son of the first Baron. In 1926 the viscountcy was revived when he was created Viscount Tredegar, of Tredegar in the County of Monmouth, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. Lord Tredegar subsequently served as Lord-Lieutenant of Monmouthshire.

Frederick Courtenay Morgan British politician

Colonel Frederick Courtenay Morgan was a British Army officer and Conservative politician.

He was succeeded by his only son, the second Viscount. He was a poet and well-known eccentric. Lord Tredegar was childless and the viscountcy became extinct on his death in 1949. He was succeeded in the baronetcy and barony by his uncle, the fifth Baron. He was a younger son of the aforementioned the Hon. Frederic Courtenay Morgan. On his death the titles passed to his son, the sixth Baron. When he died in 1962 the baronetcy and barony became extinct as well.

History of Morgan Family

The Morgan family descended from William Morgan, Member of Parliament for Monmouthshire. His eldest son Thomas Morgan was Member of Parliament for Brecon and Monmouthshire. All Thomas's children predeceased him and he left his estates to his younger brother John Morgan (1670-1720), who sat as Member of Parliament for Monmouthshire and served as Lord-Lieutenant of Breconshire and Monmouthshire. John also succeeded to the estate of his uncle and namesake, John Morgan (d. 1715), High Sheriff of Monmouthshire in 1697 and Member of Parliament for Monmouth, a merchant who had amassed a great fortune in London.

Sir William Morgan was a Welsh landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons of England between 1659 and 1680.

Sir Thomas Morgan, JP was a Welsh Whig politician of the 17th century.

John Morgan (of Rhiwpera) Welsh politician in the 18th century (of Rhiwpera)

Sir John Morgan was a Welsh politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1701 to 1720.

John's eldest son Sir William Morgan was Member of Parliament for Monmouthshire from 1722 to 1731. William's eldest son William Morgan sat as Member of Parliament for Monmouthshire from 1747 to 1763. His uncle Thomas Morgan (the son of John Morgan), known as "the General", was Member of Parliament for Brecon, Monmouthshire and Breconshire and served as Judge Advocate General from 1741 to 1768. His eldest son Thomas Morgan was Member of Parliament for Brecon and Monmouthshire. His younger brother Charles Morgan sat as Member of Parliament for Brecon and Breconshire. His younger brother John Morgan of Dderw was Member of Parliament for Brecon and Monmouthshire. On his death the male line of the Morgan family failed. His sister and heiress Jane Morgan married Charles Gould. He sat as Member of Parliament for Brecon and Breconshire and served as Judge Advocate General from 1768 to 1806. He was knighted in 1779 and created a baronet, of Tredegar in the County of Monmouth, in the Baronetage of Great Britain in 1792.

William Morgan (of Tredegar, elder) Welsh Whig politician of the early 18th century

Sir William Morgan, KB was a Welsh Whig politician of the early 18th century.

William Morgan (of Tredegar, younger) British politician

Sir William Morgan was a Welsh politician of the mid-18th century.

Thomas Morgan (judge advocate) Welsh politician and lawyer of the 18th century

Thomas Morgan was a Welsh lawyer and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1723 to 1769.

The day after his elevation to a baronetcy he assumed by Royal licence the surname of Morgan in lieu of his patronymic. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the second Baronet. He was a Lieutenant-General in the British Army and served as Commander-in-Chief of the West Indies. He was succeeded by his eldest son, the aforementioned third Baronet, who was elevated to the peerage in 1859. See above for further history of the baronetcy.

Octavius Morgan, fourth son of the second Baronet, was a politician, historian and antiquary.

Title holders

Morgan baronets, of Tredegar (1792)

Baron Tredegar (1859)

Viscounts Tredegar; First creation (1905)

Baron Tredegar (1859; Reverted)

Viscounts Tredegar; Second creation (1926)

Baron Tredegar (1859; reverted)

See also

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References