Bound (Fringe)

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"Bound"
Fringe episode
Fringe Bound Olivia.jpg
Olivia Dunham in pursuit. Her action scenes for the episode were praised, with reviewers comparing her to the 24 character Jack Bauer.
Episode no.Season 1
Episode 11
Directed by Frederick E. O. Toye
Written by J.J. Abrams
Jeff Pinkner
Alex Kurtzman
Roberto Orci
Production code3T7660
Original air dateJanuary 20, 2009
Guest appearance(s)
Episode chronology
 Previous
"Safe"
Next 
"The No-Brainer"
Fringe (season 1)
List of Fringe episodes

"Bound" is the eleventh episode of the first season of the American science fiction drama television series Fringe . It follows the aftermath of Olivia's (Anna Torv) capture in the previous episode, and subsequent efforts to identify and apprehend her kidnappers. Along with a double agent, Olivia's investigation is hampered by the appearance of Sanford Harris, an old adversary hired to audit Fringe Division.

<i>Fringe</i> (season 1) season of television series

The first season of the American science fiction television series Fringe commenced airing on the Fox network on September 9, 2008, and concluded on May 12, 2009. It was produced by Bad Robot Productions in association with Warner Bros. Television, and its showrunners were Jeff Pinkner and J.H. Wyman. The first season introduces a Federal Bureau of Investigation "Fringe Division" team based in Boston, Massachusetts under the supervision of Homeland Security. The team uses unorthodox "fringe" science and FBI investigative techniques to investigate a series of unexplained, often ghastly occurrences, which are related to mysteries surrounding a parallel universe. FBI agent Olivia Dunham is portrayed by actress Anna Torv, while actors Joshua Jackson and John Noble play father-son duo Peter and Walter Bishop. Other regular cast members include Lance Reddick, Jasika Nicole, Blair Brown, Mark Valley, and Kirk Acevedo.

Science fiction Genre of speculative fiction

Science fiction is a genre of speculative fiction that has been called the "literature of ideas". It typically deals with imaginative and futuristic concepts such as advanced science and technology, time travel, parallel universes, fictional worlds, space exploration, and extraterrestrial life. It often explores the potential consequences of scientific innovations.

Drama Artwork intended for performance, formal type of literature

Drama is the specific mode of fiction represented in performance: a play, opera, mime, ballet, etc., performed in a theatre, or on radio or television. Considered as a genre of poetry in general, the dramatic mode has been contrasted with the epic and the lyrical modes ever since Aristotle's Poetics —the earliest work of dramatic theory.

Contents

The episode was written by series co-creators J.J. Abrams, Alex Kurtzman, and Roberto Orci, as well as executive producer Jeff Pinkner. Frederick E. O. Toye served as the episode's director, and sought to create a "creepy and weird" atmosphere for Olivia's kidnapping scene to help emphasize her "terrible circumstances." First director Gary Rake believed Olivia's action scenes took her to a "higher level", and Torv herself enjoyed filming them. In addition, the episode was the first to feature Ari Graynor as Olivia's sister, Rachel. Other guest actors included Chance Kelly, Michael Gaston, Lily Pilyblad, Sara Wilson, Stephen Schnetzer, and Peter Jay Fernandez.

Alex Kurtzman American television producer

Alex Kurtzman is an American film and television writer, producer, and director. He is best known for executive producing the Star Trek franchise since 2009, co-writing the scripts to Transformers, Star Trek, Star Trek Into Darkness, and The Amazing Spider-Man 2 with his writing and producing partner Roberto Orci, and directing and co-writing The Mummy.

Roberto Orci American screenwriter producer

Roberto Gaston Orci is a Mexican-American film and television screenwriter and producer. He began his longtime collaboration with Alex Kurtzman while at school in California. Together they have been employed on television series such as Hercules: The Legendary Journeys and Xena: Warrior Princess. In 2008, together with J. J. Abrams, they created Fringe. In 2013, they created Sleepy Hollow alongside Phillip Iscove. Orci and Kurtzman's first film project was Michael Bay's The Island, and due to that partnership they went on to write the scripts for the first two films of the Transformers film series. Orci first became a film producer with 2008's Eagle Eye and again with 2009's The Proposal.

Jeff Pinkner American television writer and producer

Jeff Pinkner is an American television and movie writer and producer.

The episode first aired on January 20, 2009 on the Fox network, and was watched by an estimated 11.96 million viewers. "Bound" received generally positive reviews from television critics, as many viewed it as an improvement over previous episodes. Actor Joshua Jackson noted the importance of "Bound" developmentally for the series. At the 61st Primetime Emmy Awards, the episode was submitted in the "Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series" and "Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series" categories. Both were unsuccessful in securing nominations.

Fox Broadcasting Company American television network

The Fox Broadcasting Company is an American free-to-air television network that is a flagship property of the Fox Corporation. The network is headquartered at 1211 Avenue of the Americas in New York City, with additional offices at the Fox Broadcasting Center and at the Fox Television Center in Los Angeles.

Joshua Jackson Canadian actor

Joshua Browning Jackson is an American-Canadian actor. He is known for his starring role as Pacey Witter in the teen drama series Dawson's Creek (1998–2003), Peter Bishop in the science fiction series Fringe (2008–2013), Cole Lockhart in the drama series The Affair (2014–18), and Mickey Joseph in the drama miniseries When They See Us (2019).

61st Primetime Emmy Awards

The 61st Primetime Emmy Awards were held on Sunday, September 20, 2009. CBS broadcast the Primetime event and E! broadcast the Creative Arts event; both took place at Nokia Theatre in Los Angeles, California. The nominations were announced on July 16, 2009.

Plot

Following Olivia Dunham's (Anna Torv) kidnapping from the previous episode, "Safe", Fringe Division works to find her location. Unbeknownst to her, one of Olivia's captors is Fringe agent Mitchell Loeb (Chance Kelly). He gives her a spinal tap and returns to help with the investigation. Olivia fights off the remaining men and escapes, taking several medical samples with her. She hides the samples right before being arrested by Sanford Harris (Michael Gaston), a former adversary who was hired to audit Fringe Division. Years before, Olivia exposed and prosecuted Harris for sexually assaulting three female Marine privates, and he now wants revenge. Now recovering in Boston Hospital, Olivia's judgment is questioned by Harris for working with the mentally unstable scientist Walter Bishop (John Noble) and his law-breaking son Peter Bishop (Joshua Jackson). Harris tells her she cannot investigate her own abduction.

Olivia Dunham fictional character in the television series Fringe

Olivia Dunham is a fictional character and the main protagonist from the science fiction television series Fringe, which aired on the Fox Broadcasting Company in the United States from 2008 to 2013. The character was created by series' co-creator J. J. Abrams, and is portrayed by actress Anna Torv. Olivia is the series' protagonist, and was introduced as an FBI Special Agent, working for a multi-agency task force of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security called the Fringe Division, dealing with supernatural events that are linked to experimental occurrences. Having grown up with an abusive stepfather, Olivia struggles with the unexpected changes in her life, following her encounter with mentally unstable scientist Walter Bishop, and his son and an eventual love interest for her, Peter Bishop.

Anna Torv Australian actress

Anna Torv is an Australian actress known for her roles as FBI agent Olivia Dunham on television series Fringe (2008–2013), for which she was nominated for the Critics' Choice Television Award for Best Actress in a Drama Series in 2011, and as Dr. Wendy Carr in Netflix's Mindhunter (2017–present).

Safe (<i>Fringe</i>) 10th episode of the first season of Fringe

"Safe" is the tenth episode of the first season of the American science fiction drama television series Fringe. It begins when a group uses technology to walk through a bank's wall and steal a safe deposit box. Its contents contain special equipment meant to ultimately break David Robert Jones out of his Frankfurt jail.

Back at Fringe Division, Olivia learns that the building she was kept at is empty and contains no traces of her captors. Olivia, along with Walter and Peter, recovers the hidden samples. They soon hear of the murder of epidemiologist Miles Kinberg, who was killed by a chemical which created a giant, slug-like single cell of acute viral nasopharyngitis in his stomach. Olivia learns that Kinberg was about to start a job at the Centers for Disease Control, and that another scientist, Dr. Russell Simon, is also set to begin working there. She connects Kinberg's killers with her own captors based on the similarities of her stolen samples. Fringe Division brings Simon in for protection but he is killed soon after when Loeb gives him the same chemical agent.

Meanwhile, Olivia's sister Rachel (Ari Graynor) and niece Ella (Lily Pilblad) come to visit. Olivia succeeds in connecting the murder to Loeb by recognizing his shoes from when she was a captive. She goes to search his house but accidentally runs into his wife and accomplice, Samantha (Trini Alvarado). Loeb tells his wife to kill Olivia, and after a struggle, Olivia fatally shoots Samantha. Olivia obtains the necessary evidence to capture Loeb and questions him about her abduction. She gets little information until she shows him pictures of his dead wife, as he was unaware she was killed. Loeb angrily tells Olivia about "two sides" and that he was trying to save her.

Ari Graynor American actress

Ariel Geltman "Ari" Graynor is an American actress, known for her roles in TV series such as The Sopranos and Fringe, in stage productions such as Brooklyn Boy and The Little Dog Laughed, and in films such as Whip It and For a Good Time, Call.... She also starred as Meredith Davis on the short-lived CBS television sitcom Bad Teacher, which was cancelled on May 10, 2014.

Production

"Bound" was written by co-creators J.J. Abrams, Alex Kurtzman, and Roberto Orci, and executive producer Jeff Pinkner. Producer Frederick E. O. Toye worked as the director. [1] For Olivia's spinal tap scene, Toye attempted to create a "creepy and weird" atmosphere. [2] He explained, "She's strapped down, she's in a gurney. They're going to pull fluid out of her spine. It's creepy and weird. That's what we're going for, to try and set it up as a really awkward, horrible environment to be trapped in." [2] Toye and the crew wanted to make it "as visually interesting and dramatic as possible," and added in dripping water and "creepy" lighting to emphasize Olivia's "terrible circumstances." [2] First assistant director Gary Rake noted that the episode "took the character Olivia to a higher level... She's a lot more active, which is very exciting for us." [2]

"Bound" featured the first appearance of guest actress Ari Graynor as Olivia's sister Rachel. Ari Graynor.jpg
"Bound" featured the first appearance of guest actress Ari Graynor as Olivia's sister Rachel.

According to Orci, the idea behind the episode's fringe case originated with the show's "amazing scientific consultants," who suggested "super-sizing a common virus" when the writers were trying to brainstorm episode cases. [3] Andrew Orloff, the Creative Director and Visual Effects Supervisor of Zoic Studios, considered it one of the most challenging effects his company made for the season. [4]

Up to the point the episode aired, Anna Torv considered it her favorite episode, explaining, "In ‘Bound,’ when Olivia gets kidnapped, they’re giving her a spinal tap and she wakes up and breaks out – it was just bang, bang, bang, bang, bang. I found it really easy to follow and kind of energetic, and I really loved filming that." [5] [6] In reference to Trini Alvarado, the other actress in their fight scene, Torv also mentioned when shooting it "We had so much fun! That's probably my favorite sequence in the show thus far." [7]

Actor Joshua Jackson believed the episode was important developmentally for the series, explaining it was "creatively when the show really hit its stride in the first season." [8] Jackson continued, "I think right around the midway point of [the first] season the show decided what it wanted to be. From about the midway, point it got on a pretty good streak of episodes. I can’t remember the exact number, but the two-part episode where Dunham gets kidnapped. After that, it was pretty clear; we introduced the bad guys for the season and there was a much clearer narrative drive through the rest of the season." [8]

In December 2008, Entertainment Weekly reported that actress Ari Graynor would be joining the cast as a guest star for a minimum of three episodes, beginning in January. Her character, Olivia's younger sister Rachel, would be visiting Olivia for a few weeks because "she's dealing with some man trouble back home", as described by an insider. [9] "Bound" marked the first episode to feature the new character. [10] Other guest actors included Chance Kelly, Michael Gaston, Lily Pilyblad, Sara Wilson, Stephen Schnetzer, and Peter Jay Fernandez. [11]

Reception

Ratings

"Bound" was first broadcast on the Fox network in the United States on January 20, 2009. [12] It was watched by an estimated 11.96 million viewers, [13] an improvement over the season's episode average of 8.8 million. [14] "Bound" earned a 7.0/10 ratings share among adults aged 18 to 49. This means that it was seen by 7.0 percent of all 18- to 49-year-olds, and 10 percent of all 18- to 49-year-olds watching television at the time of broadcast. [13]

Reviews

"I love this show! And seeing it after its weeks-long hiatus just reminds me once again how much I love it and why. Part of it's because they throw little clues at us, and we're tasked to try and figure them out. Where did we see this guy before? What does this mean? How does it tie into the past? Are these new characters part of a larger conspiracy? It's a fun puzzle that isn't dumbed down for the audience."

TV Squad reviewer Jane Boursaw [15]

"Bound" has received generally positive reviews from television critics. IGN's Ramsey Isler rated "Bound" 9.6/10, explaining that the episode is "an energetic start to second half of the season, and it's hopefully a sign of things to come." [16] Olivia's "amazing" action sequence reminded Isler of the Fox television show 24 , and he equated Olivia with that series' protagonist Jack Bauer. [16] Writing for The A.V. Club , critic Zach Handlen also praised the "badassery" of the opening sequence as well as Olivia herself; he graded the episode with an A, calling it "a gripping, bizarre, occasionally wince-inducing hour of television; after a spotty first half of the season, Fringe is finally hitting its stride." [17] Jane Boursaw of TV Squad enjoyed the episode; like Isler, she also compared Olivia to Jack Bauer, and expressed suspicion that new characters Rachel and Ella were "part of a bigger conspiracy". [15]

Bryant L. Griffin of Airlock Alpha compared Olivia to the character Sydney Bristow from the television series Alias , and opined that Fringe "continues to exhibit a satisfying stride." [18] Griffin however was disappointed that events from the previous episode were ignored, believing it to be a mistake to continue emphasising formulaic storytelling rather than a serialized format. [18] Andrew Hanson from the Los Angeles Times felt that despite the extra ten minutes, "Bound" was "more like a two-hour episode... being crammed into half the time". [10] He thought the episode's four writers were "all busy", as there were three stories going on at once, and compared Olivia to the similarly characterized Lost character Jack Shephard. Hanson concluded, "But how bad can it be when my biggest complaint about a show is that I want more? And now that the cold winter of reruns has passed, we should be getting just that." [10]

Television Without Pity graded the episode with a B. [19] Various reviewers disliked the character Sanford Harris, calling him "stereotypical, [16] "one-note", [17] and "unconvincing." [18] Jeff Jensen of Entertainment Weekly noted the episode's importance in the series' history, and named it the ninth best episode of the series, explaining "Arriving midway through Fringe's shaky first season, 'Bound' was billed as a reboot that applied lessons learned from earlier episodes. (The plot mirrored the critical tune-up, with a cranky internal affairs agent conducting an audit on Fringe division.) The key focus: Making Olivia a richer, warmer, more proactive character. Mission accomplished. So began a series of rookie year corrections that helped Fringe find its voice." [20]

Awards and nominations

At the 61st Primetime Emmy Awards, director Frederick E. O. Toye submitted the episode for consideration in the Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series category, [21] but did not receive a nomination. [22] J.J. Abrams, Alex Kurtzman, Roberto Orci, Jeff Pinkner, the writers of "Bound", also submitted their work in the episode for consideration in the Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series category, [21] but received no nominations. [23]

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References

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  2. 1 2 3 4 Gary Rake; Fred Toye, Chance Kelly (2009). Fringe: Deciphering the Scene: "Bound" (DVD). Fringe: The Complete First Season Disc 4: Warner Bros. Television.
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  11. "Olivia's abduction and a possible epidemic reveal a new wrinkle in the pattern of an all-new Fringe Tuesday, January 20, on Fox". The Futon Critic (Press release). 2009-01-20. Retrieved 2012-10-02.
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