61st Primetime Emmy Awards

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61st Primetime Emmy Awards
The 61st Primetime Emmy Awards Poster.jpg
Promotional poster
Date
  • September 20, 2009
    (Ceremony)
  • September 12, 2009
    (Creative Arts Awards)
Location Nokia Theatre,
Los Angeles, California
Presented by Academy of Television Arts and Sciences
Hosted by Neil Patrick Harris (Primetime)
Kathy Griffin (Creative Arts)
Highlights
Most awards
Most nominations30 Rock (18)
Outstanding Comedy Series 30 Rock
Outstanding Drama Series Mad Men
Outstanding Miniseries Little Dorrit
Outstanding Reality-Competition Program The Amazing Race
Outstanding Variety, Music or Comedy Series The Daily Show with Jon Stewart
Television/radio coverage
Network CBS (Primetime)
E! (Creative Arts)
Produced by Don Mischer
Directed by Glenn Weiss

The 61st Primetime Emmy Awards were held on Sunday, September 20, 2009. [1] CBS broadcast the Primetime event and E! broadcast the Creative Arts event; both took place at Nokia Theatre in Los Angeles, California. The nominations were announced on July 16, 2009. [2]

Contents

On July 13, 2009, the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences announced that Neil Patrick Harris would host the Primetime ceremony (even going so far as to play Dr. Horrible at one point). [3] The Creative Arts Emmy Awards for prime time were hosted by Kathy Griffin on September 12. [4]

After the previous year's lackluster performance in ratings, the Primetime Emmy Awards were hoping to achieve success by selecting Harris as sole host, as opposed to a group of hosts as in the previous year. The 61st Primetime Emmy Awards earned a 4.2 rating in the 18–49 demo and drew 13.3 million, 1.1 million more than the previous year's all-time low. [5]

30 Rock became the sixth show to win Outstanding Comedy Series three consecutive years, winning three major awards on that night. 30 Rock made history when it smashed the record for most major nominations by a comedy series with 18. The Cosby Show had held the record of 13 since 1986, while 30 Rock had tied this the previous year. The 18 major nominations became the third biggest record of all time, behind Roots ' record number of 21 in 1977 and NYPD Blue 's mark of 19 in 1994. These records still stand.

The drama field also crowned the defending champion, AMC's Mad Men . It won two major awards on that night. After airing for fifteen seasons, ER went out a winner as its series finale won for Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series. This was the first major win for ER since 2001.

Cherry Jones became the first from a Fox network show to win the award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama series but also the second female ever from Fox to win a Major Acting award since Gillian Anderson in 1997.

History was also made by The Daily Show with Jon Stewart and The Amazing Race . Both programs won their series categories for the seventh straight year, this broke the record for most consecutive victories in a major category of six that was held by The Mary Tyler Moore Show and Cagney & Lacey . The Amazing Race would lose the following year. However, in 2013, The Daily Show's streak was finally snapped by The Colbert Report , after a record of ten consecutive wins.

Winners and nominees

Winners are listed first and highlighted in bold: [6]

Alec Baldwin, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series winner Alec Baldwin by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Alec Baldwin, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series winner
Toni Collette, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series winner Toni Collette (8968233309).jpg
Toni Collette, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series winner
Bryan Cranston, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series winner Bryan Cranston by Gage Skidmore 2.jpg
Bryan Cranston, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series winner
Glenn Close, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series winner Glenn Close - Guardians of the Galaxy premiere - July 2014 (cropped).jpg
Glenn Close, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series winner
Brendan Gleeson, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or Movie winner Brendan Gleeson at the Moet BIFA 2014.jpg
Brendan Gleeson, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or Movie winner
Jessica Lange, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or Movie winner Jessica Lange (Cropped).JPG
Jessica Lange, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or Movie winner
Jon Cryer, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series winner JonCryerHWOFSept2011 (cropped).jpg
Jon Cryer, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series winner
Kristin Chenoweth, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series winner Kristin Chenoweth in Daniel Swarovski.jpg
Kristin Chenoweth, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series winner
Michael Emerson, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series winner Michael Emerson SDCC 2013.jpg
Michael Emerson, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series winner
Cherry Jones, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series winner Cherry Jones 2009.jpg
Cherry Jones, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series winner
Ken Howard, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Movie winner Ken Howard 2014.jpg
Ken Howard, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Movie winner
Shohreh Aghdashloo, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie winner ShohrehAghdashloo08TIFF.jpg
Shohreh Aghdashloo, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie winner
Jeff Probst, Outstanding Host for a Reality or Reality-Competition Program winner Jeff Probst.jpg
Jeff Probst, Outstanding Host for a Reality or Reality-Competition Program winner

Programs

Outstanding Comedy Series Outstanding Drama Series
Outstanding Variety, Music, or Comedy Series Outstanding Variety, Music, or Comedy Special
Outstanding Made for Television Movie Outstanding Miniseries
Outstanding Reality-Competition Program

Acting

Lead performances

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or Movie Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or Movie

Supporting performances

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Movie Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie

Guest performances

Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series
  • Ellen Burstyn as Bernardette Stabler on Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (Episode: "Swing") (NBC)
    • Brenda Blethyn as Linnie Malcolm / Caroline Cantwell on Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (Episode: "Persona") (NBC)
    • Carol Burnett as Bridget "Birdie" Sulloway on Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (Episode: "Ballerina") (NBC)
    • Sharon Lawrence as Robbie Stevens on Grey's Anatomy (Episode: "No Good at Saying Sorry (One More Chance)") (ABC)
    • C. C. H. Pounder as Andrea Curtin on The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency (Episode: "The Boy with the African Heart") (HBO)

Hosting

Outstanding Host for a Reality or Reality-Competition Program

Directing

Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series
Outstanding Directing for a Variety, Music or Comedy Series Outstanding Directing for a Miniseries, Movie, or Dramatic Special
  • Bruce Gowers for American Idol (Fox)
    • Jerry Foley for Late Show with David Letterman (CBS)
    • Hal Grant for Real Time with Bill Maher (HBO)
    • Jim Hoskinson for The Colbert Report (Comedy Central)
    • Don Roy King for Saturday Night Live (NBC)
    • Chuck O'Neil for The Daily Show with Jon Stewart (Comedy Central)

Writing

Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series
Outstanding Writing for a Variety, Music, or Comedy Series Outstanding Writing for a Miniseries, Movie, or Dramatic Special
  • The Daily Show with Jon Stewart (Comedy Central)

Most major nominations

By network [note 1]
By program

Most major awards

By network [note 1]
By program
Notes
  1. 1 2 "Major" constitutes the categories listed above: Program, Acting, Directing, and Writing. Does not include the technical categories.

Presenters

The awards were presented by the following:

Name(s)Role
Tina Fey
Jon Hamm
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
Alyson Hannigan
Josh Radnor
Jason Segel
Cobie Smulders
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series
Julia Louis-Dreyfus
Amy Poehler
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series
Justin Timberlake Presenter of the award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Blake Lively
Leighton Meester
Introducers of Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series winner Justin Timberlake
and Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series winner Tina Fey
and presenters of the award for Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series
Rob Lowe Presenter of the award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series
Jon Cryer
Hayden Panettiere
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Host for a Reality or Reality-Competition Program
Tracy Morgan Presenter of the award for Outstanding Reality-Competition Program
Kevin Bacon
Kyra Sedgwick
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie
and Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Movie
Kate Walsh
Chandra Wilson
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or Movie
Patricia Arquette
Jennifer Love Hewitt
Presenters of the awards for Outstanding Writing for a Miniseries, Movie, or Dramatic Special
and Outstanding Directing for a Miniseries, Movie, or Dramatic Special
Alec Baldwin Presenter of the award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or Movie
Kiefer Sutherland
Anna Torv
Presenters of the awards for Outstanding Television Movie and Outstanding Miniseries
Kaley Cuoco
Johnny Galecki
Jim Parsons
Presenters of the awards for Outstanding Directing for a Variety Series
and Outstanding Writing for a Variety Series
Jimmy Fallon Presenter of the award for Outstanding Original Music and Lyrics
Ricky Gervais Presenter of the award for Outstanding Variety Series
LL Cool J
Chris O'Donnell
Presenters of the awards for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series
and Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
David Boreanaz
Stephen Moyer
Introducers of Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series winner Michael J. Fox
and Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series winner Ellen Burstyn
Ellen Burstyn
Michael J. Fox
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series
and Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series
Simon Baker Presenter of the award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Dana Delany Presenter of the award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series
Bob Newhart Presenter of the award for Outstanding Comedy Series
Sigourney Weaver Presenter of the award for Outstanding Drama Series

In Memoriam

The singer Sarah McLachlan performed the song "I Will Remember You" during the tribute:

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References

  1. Emmys move back to Sept. 20
  2. 2009 Primetime Emmy Awards Calendar ATAS
  3. "Neil Patrick Harris to Host the 61st Primetime Emmy Awards, to Be Broadcast Live, Sunday, Sept. 20 on the CBS Television Network". Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. July 13, 2009. Retrieved July 13, 2009.
  4. HBO Tops 2009 Creative Arts Emmys, NBC Leads Nets from the official Emmy website (retrieved September 13, 2009)
  5. CBC News - Television - Genial host helped boost Emmy ratings
  6. Emmys.com list of 2009 Nominees & Winners