31st Primetime Emmy Awards

Last updated
31st Primetime Emmy Awards
Date
  • September 9, 1979
    (Ceremony)
  • September 8, 1979
    (Creative Arts Awards)
Location Pasadena Civic Auditorium, Pasadena, California
Presented by Academy of Television Arts and Sciences
Hosted by Henry Winkler
Cheryl Ladd
Highlights
Most awards All in the Family
Friendly Fire
The Jericho Mile
Lou Grant
Roots: The Next Generations
Taxi (2)
Most nominationsLou Grant (12)
Outstanding Comedy Series Taxi
Outstanding Drama Series Lou Grant
Outstanding Limited Series Roots: The Next Generations
Outstanding Comedy-Variety or Music Program Steve & Eydie Celebrate Irving Berlin
Television/radio coverage
Network ABC

The 31st Primetime Emmy Awards were held on Sunday, September 9, 1979. The ceremony was broadcast on ABC. It was hosted by Henry Winkler and Cheryl Ladd. This ceremony is remembered for problems with the Pasadena Civic Auditorium's air-conditioning, as well as for Taxi's Outstanding Comedy Series victory.

Contents

The top shows of the night were Taxi , which pulled an upset in the Outstanding Comedy Series field when it beat All in the Family's final season. Lou Grant received 12 major nominations, which, it won two awards including Outstanding Drama Series.

For the first time, most of the miniseries and Television movie categories were merged into one, this would become the standard for later ceremonies, culminating with the TV Movie and Miniseries program categories combining in 2011. For this year only, the comedy and variety categories were combined in acting, directing, and writing. This combination would not stick, and the traditional categories returned the next year.

Winners and nominees

[1]

Programs

Outstanding Comedy Series Outstanding Drama Series
Outstanding Comedy-Variety or Music Series Outstanding Drama or Comedy Special
Outstanding Limited Series

Acting

Lead performances

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series or a Special Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series or a Special

Supporting performances

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy or Comedy-Variety or Music Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy or Comedy-Variety or Music Series
Outstanding Continuing Performance by a Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Continuing Performance by a Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or a Special Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or a Special

Directing

Outstanding Directing in a Comedy or Comedy-Variety or Music Series Outstanding Directing in a Drama Series
  • Noam Pitlik for Barney Miller, (Episode: "The Harris Incident"), (ABC)
    • Alan Alda for M*A*S*H, (Episode: "Dear Sis"), (CBS)
    • Paul Bogart, for All in the Family, (Episode: "California, Here We Are, Part II"), (CBS)
    • Charles S. Dubin for M*A*S*H, (Episode: "Point of View"), (CBS)
    • Jay Sandrich for Soap, (Episode: "Episode #27"), (ABC)
Outstanding Directing in a Limited Series or a Special

Writing

Outstanding Writing in a Comedy or Comedy-Variety or Music Series Outstanding Writing in a Drama Series
  • Michele Gallery for Lou Grant, (Episode: "Dying"), (CBS)
    • James Bridges, for The Paper Chase, (Episode: "The Late Mr. Hart"), (CBS)
    • Gene Reynolds for Lou Grant, (Episode: "Marathon"), (CBS)
    • Leon Tokatyan for Lou Grant, (Episode: "Vet"), (CBS)
Outstanding Writing in a Limited Series or a Special
  • Patrick J. Nolan, Michael Mann for The Jericho Mile, (ABC)
    • Gwen Bagni, Paul Dubov for Backstairs at the White House, (Episode: "Book One"), (NBC)
    • Jane-Howard Hammerstein for Summer of My German Soldier, (NBC)
    • Fay Kanin for Friendly Fire, (ABC)
    • Ernest Kinoy for Roots: The Next Generations, (Episode: "Part I"), (ABC)

Most major nominations

By network [note 1]
By program

Most major awards

By network [note 1]
By program
Notes
  1. 1 2 "Major" constitutes the categories listed above: Program, Acting, Directing, and Writing. Does not include the technical categories.

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