25th Primetime Emmy Awards

Last updated
25th Primetime Emmy Awards
DateMay 20, 1973
Location Shubert Theatre,
Los Angeles, California
Presented by Academy of Television Arts and Sciences
Hosted by Johnny Carson
Highlights
Most awards The Waltons (5)
Most nominationsThe Waltons (9)
Outstanding Comedy Series All in the Family
Outstanding Drama Series The Waltons
Outstanding Limited Series Tom Brown's Schooldays
Outstanding Variety Musical Series The Julie Andrews Hour
Television/radio coverage
Network ABC

The 25th Emmy Awards, later known as the 25th Primetime Emmy Awards, were handed out on May 20, 1973. The ceremony was hosted by Johnny Carson. This would be the final ceremony that included daytime categories, as the Daytime Emmy Awards premiered the next year. Winners are listed in bold and series' networks are in parentheses.

Contents

The top shows of the night were All in the Family which won its third consecutive Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Comedy Series, and The Waltons . The Waltons, in its first season, had the most major nominations heading into the ceremony (9), and won the most major awards on the night with five.

Winners and nominees

Source: [1]

Programs

Outstanding Comedy Series Outstanding Drama Series - Continuing
Outstanding Variety Musical Series Outstanding Single Program - Variety or Musical - Variety and Popular Music
Outstanding Program Achievement in Daytime DramaOutstanding Program Achievement in Daytime
Outstanding Achievement in Children's Programming - Informational/FactualOutstanding Achievement in Children's Programming - Entertainment/Fictional
Outstanding Achievement in Sports Programming Outstanding Single Program - Drama or Comedy
Outstanding New Series Outstanding Limited Series
  • America, (NBC)
    • The Julie Andrews Hour, (ABC)
    • Kung Fu, (ABC)
    • M*A*S*H, (CBS)
    • Maude, (CBS)
    • The Waltons, (CBS)

Acting

Lead performances

Outstanding Continued Performance
by an Actor in a Leading Role in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Continued Performance
by an Actress in a Leading Role in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Continued Performance
by an Actor in a Leading Role (Drama Series - Continuing)
Outstanding Continued Performance
by an Actress in a Leading Role (Drama Series - Continuing)
Outstanding Continued Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role (Drama/Comedy - Limited Episodes)Outstanding Continued Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role (Drama/Comedy - Limited Episodes)

Supporting performances

Outstanding Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Comedy Outstanding Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Comedy
Outstanding Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Drama Outstanding Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Drama

Single performances

Outstanding Single Performance by an Actor in a Leading RoleOutstanding Single Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role
  • Cloris Leachman as Victoria Douglas on A Brand New Life, (ABC)

Directing

Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Comedy Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Drama -
A Single Program of a Series with Continuing Characters and/or Theme
  • Jay Sandrich for Mary Tyler Moore, (Episode: "It's Whether You Win or Lose"), (CBS)
  • Jerry Thorpe for Kung Fu, (Episode: "An Eye for an Eye"), (ABC)
    • Edward M. Abroms for Columbo, (Episode: "The Most Dangerous Match"), (NBC)
    • Lee Philips for The Waltons, (Episode: "The Love Story"), (CBS)
Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Comedy, Variety or Music Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Drama - A Single Program
Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Variety or Music
  • Bill Davis for The Julie Andrews Hour, (ABC)
    • Tim Kiley for The Flip Wilson Show, (NBC)
    • Art Fisher for The Sonny and Cher Comedy Hour, (CBS)

Writing

Outstanding Writing Achievement in Comedy Outstanding Writing Achievement in Drama
Outstanding Writing Achievement in Comedy, Variety or Music Outstanding Writing Achievement in Variety or Music
  • Acts of Love and Other Comedies, (ABC)
    • The Lily Tomlin Show, (CBS)
    • Liza with a Z, (NBC)
  • The Carol Burnett Show, (CBS)
    • The Flip Wilson Show, (NBC)
    • The Julie Andrews Hour, (ABC)
Outstanding Writing Achievement in Drama - Original TeleplayOutstanding Writing Achievement in Drama - Adaptation

Most major nominations

By network [note 1]
By program

Most major awards

By network [note 1]
By program
Notes
  1. 1 2 "Major" constitutes the categories listed above: Program, Acting, Directing, and Writing. Does not include the technical categories.

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