55th Primetime Emmy Awards

Last updated
55th Primetime Emmy Awards
The 55th Primetime Emmy Awards Poster.jpg
Promotional poster
Date
  • September 21, 2003
    (Ceremony)
  • September 13, 2003
    (Creative Arts Awards)
Location Shrine Auditorium,
Los Angeles, California
Presented by Academy of Television Arts and Sciences
Highlights
Most awards
Most nominations
Outstanding Comedy Series Everybody Loves Raymond
Outstanding Drama Series The West Wing
Outstanding Miniseries Taken
Outstanding Reality-Competition Program The Amazing Race
Outstanding Variety, Music or Comedy Series The Daily Show with Jon Stewart
Television/radio coverage
Network Fox

The 55th Primetime Emmy Awards were held on Sunday, September 21, 2003. The ceremony was broadcast on Fox. The Sci Fi channel received its first major nomination this year for Outstanding Miniseries for Taken , for which it won.

Contents

With the win for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series for Debra Messing, Will & Grace became only the third television show to have all credited actors winning a Primetime Emmy Award for their respective role, following All in the Family and The Golden Girls (also later tied by The Simpsons ). For its seventh season, Everybody Loves Raymond won its first Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Comedy Series. It led all comedies with four major wins and ten major nominations. The West Wing won Outstanding Drama Series for the fourth consecutive year, tying the record set by Hill Street Blues (also later tied by Game of Thrones and Mad Men ).

Despite failing to win Outstanding Drama Series, The Sopranos continued to rake in the awards, leading all dramas with four major wins, including James Gandolfini and Edie Falco winning their third and final trophy for their respective category. Also Joe Pantoliano's win for Supporting Actor in a Drama marked the first time HBO had won in this category.

Additionally, for the first time, not only did the Lead Male in a Comedy award go to a show outside the Big Four TV networks, with Tony Shalhoub's win, for Monk on the USA Network, it was that network's first ever Acting win.

For the first time since 1991, the Outstanding Drama Series field did not include Law & Order ; it was nominated 11 times in the category, a record for drama series that still stands. The mark tied the overall record held by comedy series M*A*S*H and Cheers . For the first time since its premiere, Frasier , then in its tenth and penultimate season, didn't win a major award, with its only major nominations going to David Hyde Pierce and John Mahoney for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series. The ceremony featured 11 presenters, which included: Ellen DeGeneres, Brad Garrett, Darrell Hammond, George Lopez, Conan O'Brien, Bernie Mac, Dennis Miller, Garry Shandling (who opened the show with a comedic monologue), Martin Short, Jon Stewart, and Wanda Sykes. [1]

Winners and nominees

Winners are listed first and highlighted in bold: [2]

Tony Shalhoub, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series winner Tony Shalhoub (1).jpg
Tony Shalhoub, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series winner
Debra Messing, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series winner Debra Messing at the 2009 Tribeca Film Festival.jpg
Debra Messing, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series winner
James Gandolfini, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series winner James Gandolfini in Kuwait City 2010 (cropped).jpg
James Gandolfini, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series winner
Edie Falco, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series winner Edie Falco 2010.jpg
Edie Falco, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series winner
William H. Macy, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or Movie winner WilliamHMacyTIFFSept2012.jpg
William H. Macy, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or Movie winner
Maggie Smith, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or Movie winner Dame Maggie Smith-cropped.jpg
Maggie Smith, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or Movie winner
Brad Garrett, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series winner BradGarrettApr2011.jpg
Brad Garrett, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series winner
Doris Roberts, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series winner DorisRobertsDec10.jpg
Doris Roberts, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series winner
Joe Pantoliano, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series winner JoePantolianoFeb2009 (cropped).jpg
Joe Pantoliano, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series winner
Tyne Daly, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series winner Tyne Daly at the 2009 Tribeca Film Festival.jpg
Tyne Daly, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series winner
Ben Gazzara, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Movie winner Ben Gazarra - still.jpg
Ben Gazzara, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Movie winner
Gena Rowlands, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie winner Gena Rowlands - 1967.JPG
Gena Rowlands, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie winner
Wayne Brady, Outstanding Individual Performance in a Variety or Music Program winner Wayne Brady 2015.jpg
Wayne Brady, Outstanding Individual Performance in a Variety or Music Program winner

Programs

Outstanding Comedy Series Outstanding Drama Series
Outstanding Variety, Music, or Comedy Series Outstanding Variety, Music, or Comedy Special
Outstanding Made for Television Movie Outstanding Miniseries
Outstanding Reality-Competition Program

Acting

Lead performances

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie

Supporting performances

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
  • Brad Garrett as Robert Barone on Everybody Loves Raymond (Episodes: "Just a Formality" + "Robert's Wedding"), (CBS)
    • Peter Boyle as Frank Barone on Everybody Loves Raymond (Episodes: "Grandpa Steals" + "Meeting the Parents"), (CBS)
    • Bryan Cranston as Hal on Malcolm in the Middle (Episodes: "Malcolm Holds His Tongue" + "Day Care"), (Fox)
    • Sean Hayes as Jack McFarland on Will & Grace (Episodes: "Bacon and Eggs" + "The Needle and the Omelets Done"), (NBC)
    • John Mahoney as Martin Crane on Frasier (Episodes: "The Devil and Dr. Phil" + "Fathers and Sons"), (NBC)
    • David Hyde Pierce as Dr. Niles Crane on Frasier (Episodes: "Fraternal Schwinns" + "Roe to Perdition"), (NBC)
  • Doris Roberts as Marie Barone on Everybody Loves Raymond (Episodes: "Marie's Vision" + "Robert's Wedding"), (CBS)
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie

Guest performances

Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series
  • Gene Wilder as Mr. Stein on Will & Grace (Episode: "Boardroom and a Parked Place"), (NBC)
    • Hank Azaria as David on Friends (Episode: "The One with the Donor"), (NBC)
    • David Duchovny as Johnny Volcano on Life with Bonnie (Episode: "Partly Sunny"), (ABC)
    • Fred Willard as Hank MacDougall on Everybody Loves Raymond (Episode: "Meet the Parents"), (CBS)
    • Jonathan Winters as Q.T. Marlens on Life with Bonnie (Episode: "Money Plus Marlens Makes Four"), (ABC)
  • Christina Applegate as Amy Green on Friends (Episode: "The One with Rachel's Other Sister"), (NBC)
    • Georgia Engel as Pat MacDougall on Everybody Loves Raymond (Episode: "Meet the Parents"), (CBS)
    • Betty Garrett as Molly Firth on Becker (Episode: "Nightmare on Becker Street"), (CBS)
    • Cloris Leachman as Grandma Ida on Malcolm in the Middle (Episode: "Grandma Sues"), (Fox)
    • Betty White as Sylvia on Yes, Dear (Episode: "Kim's New Nanny"), (CBS)
Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series

Directing

Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series
  • Robert B. Weide for Curb Your Enthusiasm (Episode: "Krazee-Eyez Killa"), (HBO)
    • James Burrows for Will & Grace (Episode: "24"), (NBC)
    • Larry Charles for Curb Your Enthusiasm (Episode: "The Nanny from Hell"), (HBO)
    • Michael Engler for Sex and the City (Episode: "I Love a Charade"), (HBO)
    • Bryan Gordon for Curb Your Enthusiasm (Episode: "The Special Section"), (HBO)
    • David Steinberg for Curb Your Enthusiasm (Episode: "Mary, Joseph, and Larry"), (HBO)
Outstanding Directing for a Variety, Music or Comedy Program Outstanding Directing for a Miniseries, Movie or a Dramatic Special

Writing

Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series
Outstanding Writing for a Variety, Music, or Comedy Program Outstanding Writing for a Miniseries, Movie or a Dramatic Special
  • The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, (Comedy Central)
    • Late Night with Conan O'Brien, (NBC)
    • Late Show with David Letterman, (CBS)
    • Robin Williams: Live on Broadway, (HBO)
    • Saturday Night Live, (NBC)
  • William H. Macy, Steven Schachter for Door to Door, (TNT)

Most major nominations

By network [note 1]
By program

Most major awards

By network [note 1]
By program

In Memoriam

Notes
  1. 1 2 "Major" constitutes the categories listed above: Program, Acting, Directing, and Writing. Does not include the technical categories.

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References

  1. "55th Primetime Emmy Awards". Digitalhit.com. Digital Hit Entertainment/ Multiplex Theatre Properties Inc. 2003-09-21. Retrieved 2016-03-24.
  2. Emmys.com list of 2003 Nominees & Winners