69th Primetime Emmy Awards

Last updated

69th Primetime Emmy Awards
The 69th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards Poster.jpg
Promotional poster
Date
Location Microsoft Theater,
Los Angeles, California [2]
Presented by Academy of Television Arts and Sciences
Hosted by Stephen Colbert
Highlights
Most awards
Most nominations
Outstanding Comedy Series Veep
Outstanding Drama Series The Handmaid's Tale
Outstanding Limited Series Big Little Lies
Outstanding Competition Program The Voice
Outstanding Variety Talk Series Last Week Tonight with John Oliver
Website http://www.emmys.com/   OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg
Television/radio coverage
Network CBS [1]
Produced by Ricky Kirshner
Glenn Weiss
Directed byGlenn Weiss

The 69th Primetime Emmy Awards honored the best in U.S. prime time television programming from June 1, 2016 until May 31, 2017, as chosen by the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences. The ceremony was held on Sunday, September 17, 2017 at the Microsoft Theater in Downtown Los Angeles, California, and was broadcast in the U.S. by CBS. The ceremony was hosted by Stephen Colbert. [1] The 69th Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Awards were held on September 9 and 10, and was broadcast by FXX on September 16. [3]

Contents

The nominations were announced by Anna Chlumsky and Shemar Moore on July 13, 2017. [4] Channelwise, the freshman HBO science fiction western drama Westworld and NBC sketch comedy Saturday Night Live were the most nominated programs, each with 22 nominations. [5] [6]

Host Stephen Colbert opened the ceremony with a song-and-dance number and a monologue that lampooned the state of the world under President Donald Trump, which The New York Times said set an anti-Trump tone for the rest of the event. [7] Many of the further presentations and host commentary continued jokes aimed towards Trump, along with winners' speeches criticizing the President and standing behind diversity in the television field. [8] Sean Spicer, Trump's former White House Press Secretary, made an appearance in which he parodied himself. [7] RuPaul played a living Emmy statue in a comedic interview segment with Colbert during the ceremony. [9] [10]

Original programming streaming television services—Netflix and Hulu—upended traditional broadcast television series in several categories. Netflix series earned a total of 20 Primetime Emmy Awards, following only HBO with 29 and leading NBC with 15. [11] [12] Hulu's The Handmaid's Tale became the first web series to win Outstanding Drama Series. [13] Additionally, streaming television also won their first awards for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series (Elisabeth Moss for The Handmaid's Tale – Hulu), Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series (Alexis Bledel for The Handmaid's Tale – Hulu), [note 1] Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series (Bruce Miller for The Handmaid's Tale – Hulu), Outstanding Television Movie ( Black Mirror: San Junipero – Netflix), and Outstanding Writing for a Limited Series, Movie, or Dramatic Special (Charlie Brooker for Black Mirror: San Junipero – Netflix).

In addition, the night saw several other historic firsts: Donald Glover became the first African-American to win Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series for Atlanta . [14] Riz Ahmed, with his win for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series or Movie for The Night Of , became the first Asian to win that category as well as the first Asian male to win an acting award and first South Asian to win a lead acting award. [15] [16] Moreover, Ahmed and Dave Chappelle also became the first Muslims to win acting awards, with Ahmed being the first Muslim to win a lead acting award and Chappelle the first to win for a guest role for Saturday Night Live . [17] With Aziz Ansari and Lena Waithe winning Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series for Master of None , Waithe became the first African-American female to win that award. [18] Finally, Julia Louis-Dreyfus won her record sixth consecutive award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series for the same category for the same role in a single series as Selina Meyer on Veep ; she is now tied with Cloris Leachman for the most wins as a performer. [19]

The awards ceremony drew 11.4 million viewers, on par with the previous awards ceremony, but one of the lowest viewerships for the Primetime Emmy Awards overall. Analysts attribute this to younger audiences preferring to watch clips or summaries than the entire event [20] and to Florida markets being affected by Hurricane Irma. [21]

Winners and nominees

Winners are listed first and highlighted in bold. [22] [23]

Donald Glover, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series winner Donald Glover TIFF 2015.jpg
Donald Glover, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series winner
Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series winner Julia Louis-Dreyfus VF 2012 Shankbone 3.jpg
Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series winner
Sterling K. Brown, Outstanding Lead Actor in Drama Series winner Sterling K. Brown Paleyfest.jpg
Sterling K. Brown, Outstanding Lead Actor in Drama Series winner
Elisabeth Moss, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series winner Elisabeth Moss at PaleyFest 2014.jpg
Elisabeth Moss, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series winner
Riz Ahmed, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series or Movie winner Riz Ahmed performing at Occupy London NYE Party 2011.jpg
Riz Ahmed, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series or Movie winner
Nicole Kidman, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series or Movie winner Nicole Kidman Cannes 2017 2.jpg
Nicole Kidman, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series or Movie winner
Alec Baldwin, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series winner Alec Baldwin by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Alec Baldwin, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series winner
Kate McKinnon, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series winner Kate McKinnon 2018 (cropped).jpg
Kate McKinnon, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series winner
John Lithgow, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series winner John Lithgow 8 by David Shankbone.jpg
John Lithgow, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series winner
Ann Dowd, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series winner Ann Dowd 2016 (cropped).jpg
Ann Dowd, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series winner
Alexander Skarsgard, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie winner Alexander Skarsgard (29485267411) (cropped).jpg
Alexander Skarsgård, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie winner
Laura Dern, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie winner Laura Dern Deauville 2017.jpg
Laura Dern, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie winner

Programs

Outstanding Comedy Series Outstanding Drama Series
Outstanding Variety Talk Series Outstanding Variety Sketch Series
Outstanding Limited Series Outstanding Television Movie
Outstanding Reality-Competition Program

Acting

Lead performances

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series or Movie

Supporting performances

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
  • Kate McKinnon as Various Characters on Saturday Night Live (Episode: "Host: Dave Chappelle") (NBC)
    • Vanessa Bayer as Various Characters on Saturday Night Live (Episode: "Host: Dwayne Johnson") (NBC)
    • Anna Chlumsky as Amy Brookheimer on Veep (Episode: "Groundbreaking") (HBO)
    • Kathryn Hahn as Raquel Fein on Transparent (Episode: "Life Sucks and Then You Die") (Amazon)
    • Leslie Jones as Various Characters on Saturday Night Live (Episode: "Host: Tom Hanks") (NBC)
    • Judith Light as Shelly Pfefferman on Transparent (Episode: "Exciting and New") (Amazon)
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie

Directing

Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series
Outstanding Directing for a Variety Series Outstanding Directing for a Limited Series, Movie, or Dramatic Special

Writing

Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series
Outstanding Writing for a Variety Series Outstanding Writing for a Limited Series, Movie, or Dramatic Special

Most major nominations

By network [note 2]
By program

Most major awards

By network [note 2]
By program

Presenters and performers

The awards were presented by the following: [24] [25] [26]

Presenters

Name(s)Role
Jermaine Fowler Announcer for the 69th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards
Laura Dern
Nicole Kidman
Zoë Kravitz
Reese Witherspoon
Shailene Woodley
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series
Shemar Moore
Gina Rodriguez
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
Riz Ahmed
Issa Rae
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie
Dave Chappelle
Melissa McCarthy
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series
Anna Faris
Allison Janney
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Variety Sketch Series
LL Cool J
Gabrielle Union
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series
James Corden
Seth Meyers
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series
Alexis Bledel
Gerald McRaney
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Directing for a Limited Series, Movie, or Dramatic Special
Jane Fonda
Dolly Parton
Lily Tomlin
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie
Kaitlin Olson
Tracee Ellis Ross
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Writing for a Variety Series
Sonequa Martin-Green
Jeremy Piven
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
Hayma WashingtonIntroducer of a special presentation highlighting diversity and inclusion in television
Iain Armitage
Jim Parsons
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series
Lea Michele
Kumail Nanjiani
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Reality-Competition Program
Mark Feuerstein
Rashida Jones
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series
Seth MacFarlane
Emmy Rossum
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Writing for a Limited Series, Movie, or Dramatic Special
Viola Davis Presenter of the In Memoriam tribute
Craig Robinson
Adam Scott
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Directing for a Variety Series
Anthony Anderson
Priyanka Chopra
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Variety Talk Series
Alec Baldwin
Edie Falco
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series
Chris Hardwick
Debra Messing
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Carol Burnett
Norman Lear
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Comedy Series
Jessica Biel
Joseph Fiennes
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series or Movie
Jason Bateman
Sarah Paulson
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series or Movie
Matt Bomer
BD Wong
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Television Movie
Anika Noni Rose
Cicely Tyson
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Limited Series
Dennis Quaid
Kyra Sedgwick
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series
Tatiana Maslany
Jeffrey Dean Morgan
Presenters of the award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Oprah Winfrey Presenter of the award for Outstanding Drama Series

Performers

Name(s)Performed
Stephen Colbert
Chance the Rapper
Millie Bobby Brown
Julia Louis-Dreyfus
Tony Hale
Keri Russell
Matthew Rhys
"Everything is Better on TV"
Christopher Jackson "As"

In Memoriam

Broadway actor Christopher Jackson performed Stevie Wonder's "As" as images of television personalities who died in the past year were shown in the following order. [27]

Notes

  1. Awarded the weekend before at the Primetime Creative Arts Emmy Awards
  2. 1 2 "Major" constitutes the categories listed above: Program, Acting, Directing, and Writing. Does not include the technical categories.

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