53rd Primetime Emmy Awards

Last updated
53rd Primetime Emmy Awards
Date
  • November 4, 2001
    (Ceremony)
  • September 8, 2001
    (Creative Arts Awards)
Location Shubert Theatre,
Los Angeles, California, U.S. (ceremony)
Shrine Auditorium,
Los Angeles, California, U.S. (Creative Arts Awards)
Presented by Academy of Television Arts and Sciences
Hosted by Ellen DeGeneres
Highlights
Most awards The West Wing (4)
Most nominations The Sopranos (14)
Outstanding Comedy Series Sex and the City
Outstanding Drama Series The West Wing
Outstanding Miniseries Anne Frank: The Whole Story
Outstanding Variety, Music or Comedy Series Late Show with David Letterman
Television/radio coverage
Network CBS

The 53rd Primetime Emmy Awards were held on Sunday, November 4, 2001, seven weeks later than originally scheduled. The ceremony was rescheduled twice from its original date of September 16 at the Shrine Auditorium because of the September 11, 2001 attacks that occurred five days prior to the event. It was also removed from its rescheduled date of October 7 again at the same venue as a result of the start of the War in Afghanistan. The event was then relocated to the smaller Shubert Theater, which had previously hosted the 1973 and 1976 ceremonies, and would be demolished in 2002. The ceremony was hosted by Ellen DeGeneres and was broadcast on CBS.

Contents

Barbra Streisand sang "You'll Never Walk Alone" in a surprise appearance at the close, in honor of the victims of the attacks. [1]

Sex and the City became the first premium channel show to win Outstanding Comedy Series; this was its only major award. The NBC cult hit Freaks and Geeks accomplished a rare feat: though it only ran for one season, it was nominated in two different years for writing. Frasier , now in its eighth season, earned its final Outstanding Comedy Series nomination after eight consecutive nominations including five consecutive wins (seasons 1–5).

The episode "Bowling" made Malcolm in the Middle just the second show, and first comedy, to have two different episodes win awards for directing and writing. The Defenders was the first show to do this in 1963 and 1965. (Specific episodes were not nominated in the comedy categories until the late 1960s). Game of Thrones would also achieve this in 2015 and 2016.

For his portrayal of John Cage in Ally McBeal , Peter MacNicol won Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series, the first in this category for Fox and the first in this category for any show outside the Big Three television networks.

In the drama field, The West Wing won Outstanding Drama Series for its second straight year and led all shows with four major awards on the night. The Sopranos led all shows with 14 major nominations and was second to The West Wing with three major wins.

Mike Nichols' win made him the ninth person to become an EGOT winner.

Winners and nominees

Winners are listed first and highlighted in bold: [2]

Eric McCormack, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series winner Eric McCormack 2012 Shankbone 3.JPG
Eric McCormack, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series winner
Patricia Heaton, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series winner Patricia Heaton.jpg
Patricia Heaton, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series winner
James Gandolfini, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series winner James Gandolfini in Kuwait City 2010 (cropped).jpg
James Gandolfini, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series winner
Edie Falco, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series winner Edie Falco 2010.jpg
Edie Falco, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series winner
Kenneth Branagh, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or Movie winner KennethBranaghApr2011.jpg
Kenneth Branagh, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or Movie winner
Judy Davis, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or Movie winner Judy Davis - Eye of The Storm.jpg
Judy Davis, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or Movie winner
Peter MacNicol, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series winner Peter MacNicol.jpg
Peter MacNicol, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series winner
Doris Roberts, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series winner DorisRobertsDec10.jpg
Doris Roberts, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series winner
Bradley Whitford, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series winner Bradleywhitford.jpg
Bradley Whitford, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series winner
Allison Janney, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series winner Allison-Janney in 2014.jpg
Allison Janney, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series winner
Brian Cox, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Movie winner BrianCoxTIFFSept2011.jpg
Brian Cox, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Movie winner
Barbra Streisand, Outstanding Individual Performance in a Variety or Music Program winner Barbra Streisand - 1966.jpg
Barbra Streisand, Outstanding Individual Performance in a Variety or Music Program winner

Programs

Outstanding Comedy Series Outstanding Drama Series
Outstanding Variety, Music, or Comedy Series Outstanding Variety, Music, or Comedy Special
Outstanding Made for Television Movie Outstanding Miniseries

Acting

Lead performances

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or Movie Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or Movie

Supporting performances

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Movie Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie

Guest performances

Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series
  • Jean Smart as Lana Gardner on Frasier, (NBC)
    • Jami Gertz as Kimmy Bishop on Ally McBeal (Episode: "Tis the Season"), (Fox)
    • Cloris Leachman as Grandma Ida on Malcolm in the Middle (Episode: "Grandparents"), (Fox)
    • Bernadette Peters as Cassandra Lewis on Ally McBeal (Episode: "The Getaway"), (Fox)
    • Susan Sarandon as Cecilia Monroe on Friends (Episode: "The One with Joey's New Brain"), (NBC)
Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series
  • Michael Emerson as William Hinks on The Practice (Episode: "An Early Frost"), (ABC)
    • René Auberjonois as Judge Mantz on The Practice (Episode: "We Hold These Truths"), (ABC)
    • James Cromwell as Bishop Lionel Stewart on ER (Episode: "A Walk in the Woods"), (NBC)
    • Patrick Dempsey as Aaron Brooks on Once and Again (Episode: "Strangers and Brothers"), (ABC)
    • Oliver Platt as Oliver Babish on The West Wing (Episode: "The Fall's Gonna Kill You"), (NBC)

Directing

Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series
Outstanding Directing for a Variety or Music Program Outstanding Directing for a Miniseries or Movie

Writing

Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series
Outstanding Writing for a Variety or Music Program Outstanding Writing for a Miniseries or Movie
  • The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, (Comedy Central)

Most major nominations

By network [note 1]
By program

Most major awards

By network [note 1]
By program
Notes
  1. 1 2 "Major" constitutes the categories listed above: Program, Acting, Directing, and Writing. Does not include the technical categories.

In Memoriam

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