47th Primetime Emmy Awards

Last updated
47th Primetime Emmy Awards
47th Primetime Emmy Awards logo.jpg
Promotional poster
Date
  • September 10, 1995
    (Ceremony)
  • September 9, 1995
    (Creative Arts Awards)
Location Pasadena Civic Auditorium, Pasadena, California
Presented by Academy of Television Arts and Sciences
Hosted by Jason Alexander
Cybill Shepherd
Highlights
Most awards Frasier (5)
Most nominations ER (11)
Outstanding Comedy Series Frasier
Outstanding Drama Series NYPD Blue
Outstanding Miniseries Joseph
Outstanding Variety, Music or Comedy Series The Tonight Show with Jay Leno
Television/radio coverage
Network Fox

The 47th Primetime Emmy Awards were held on Sunday, September 10, 1995. The ceremony was hosted by Jason Alexander and Cybill Shepherd. It was broadcast on Fox.

Contents

Frasier won its second consecutive Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Comedy Series and led all shows with five major wins. For the second straight year, a freshman drama series came into the ceremony with a bevy of major nominations, but failed to win for Outstanding Drama Series. ER led all shows with 11 major nominations and won three major awards, but lost the top prize to NYPD Blue , which was in a similar situation to ER the previous year.

Candice Bergen's win for the seventh season of Murphy Brown made her the third performer to win five Emmys for playing the same character. She declined to be submitted for any future seasons of the show.

Marvin Hamlisch's win made him the sixth person to become an EGOT.

Winners and nominees

[1]

Programs

Outstanding Comedy Series Outstanding Drama Series
Outstanding Variety, Music or Comedy Series Outstanding Variety, Music or Comedy Special
Outstanding Made for Television Movie Outstanding Miniseries

Acting

Lead performances

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a Special Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Special

Supporting performances

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or a Special Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Special
  • Judy Davis as Diane on Serving in Silence: The Margarethe Cammermeyer Story (NBC)
  • Shirley Knight as Peggy Buckey on Indictment: The McMartin Trial (HBO)
    • Sônia Braga as Regina De Carvalho on The Burning Season (HBO)
    • Sissy Spacek as Spring Renfro on The Good Old Boys (TNT)
    • Sada Thompson as Virginia McMartin on Indictment: The McMartin Trial (HBO)

Guest performances

Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series
  • Carl Reiner as Alan Brady on Mad About You (Episode: "The Alan Brady Show"), (NBC)
    • Sid Caesar as Mr. Stein on Love & War (Episode: "At the Pantheon", Part 2), (CBS)
    • Nathan Lane as Phil on Frasier (Episode: "Fool Me Once, Shame On You. Fool Me Twice..."), (NBC)
    • Robert Pastorelli as Eldin Bernecky on Murphy Brown (Episode: "Bye, Bye Bernecky"), (CBS)
    • Paul Reubens as Andrew J. Lansing III on Murphy Brown (Episode: "The Good Nephew"), (NBC)
Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series

Directing

Outstanding Individual Achievement in Directing for a Comedy Series Outstanding Individual Achievement in Directing for a Drama Series
  • Mimi Leder for ER (Episode: "Love's Labor Lost"), (NBC)
Outstanding Individual Achievement in Directing for a Variety or Music Program Outstanding Individual Achievement in Directing for a Miniseries or a Special

Writing

Outstanding Individual Achievement in Writing for a Comedy Series Outstanding Individual Achievement in Writing for a Drama Series
  • Chuck Ranberg, Anne Flett-Giordano for Frasier (Episode: "An Affair to Forget"), (NBC)
    • Jeff Greenstein, Jeff Strauss for Friends (Episode: "The One Where Underdog Gets Away"), (NBC)
    • Joe Keenan for Frasier (Episode: "The Matchmaker"), (NBC)
    • Garry Shandling, Peter Tolan for The Larry Sanders Show (Episode: "The Mr. Sharon Stone Show"), (HBO)
    • Peter Tolan for The Larry Sanders Show (Episode: "Hank's Night in the Sun"), (HBO)
Outstanding Individual Achievement in Writing for a Variety or Music Program Outstanding Individual Achievement in Writing for a Miniseries or a Special

Most major nominations

By network [note 1]
By program

Most major awards

By network [note 1]
By program
Notes
  1. 1 2 "Major" constitutes the categories listed above: Program, Acting, Directing, and Writing. Does not include the technical categories.

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