27th Primetime Emmy Awards

Last updated
27th Primetime Emmy Awards
DateMay 19, 1975
Location Hollywood Palladium,
Los Angeles, California
Presented by Academy of Television Arts and Sciences
Highlights
Most awards The Mary Tyler Moore Show (4)
Most nominations M*A*S*H (9)
Outstanding Comedy Series The Mary Tyler Moore Show
Outstanding Drama Series Upstairs, Downstairs
Outstanding Limited Series Benjamin Franklin
Outstanding Comedy-Variety or Music Series The Carol Burnett Show
Television/radio coverage
Network CBS

The 27th Emmy Awards, later known as the 27th Primetime Emmy Awards, were handed out on May 19, 1975. There was no host this year. Winners are listed in bold and series' networks are in parentheses.

Contents

The top shows of the night were Mary Tyler Moore , and Upstairs, Downstairs which won its second straight Emmy for Outstanding Drama Series. M*A*S*H led all shows with nine major nominations heading into the ceremony, but only won one award. Mary Tyler Moore led all shows with four major wins.

This is the 1st ceremony where one network received all the nominations in a Series category. It would not happen again until the 39th Primetime Emmy Awards.

Winners and nominees

[1] Note: Winners are indicated in bold type.

Programs

Outstanding Comedy Series Outstanding Drama Series
Outstanding Comedy-Variety or Music Series Outstanding Special - Comedy-Variety or Music
  • An Evening with John Denver, (ABC)
  • Lily, (ABC)
  • Shirley MacLaine: If They Could See Me Now, (CBS)
Outstanding Special - Drama or Comedy Outstanding Limited Series

Acting

Lead performances

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Special Program – Drama or Comedy Outstanding Lead Actress in a Special Program – Drama or Comedy
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series

Supporting performances

Outstanding Continuing Performance by a Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Continuing Performance by a Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Continuing Performance by a Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Continuing Performance by a Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
  • Ellen Corby as Esther Walton on The Waltons, (CBS)
  • Angela Baddeley as Mrs. Bridges on Upstairs, Downstairs, (PBS)
  • Nancy Walker as Mildred on McMillan & Wife, (NBC)
Outstanding Single Performance
by a Supporting Actor in a Comedy or Drama Special
Outstanding Single Performance
by a Supporting Actress in a Comedy or Drama Special
Outstanding Single Performance
by a Supporting Actor in a Comedy or Drama Series
Outstanding Single Performance
by a Supporting Actress in a Comedy or Drama Series

Directing

Outstanding Directing in a Comedy Series Outstanding Directing in a Drama Series
  • Gene Reynolds for M*A*S*H, (Episode: "O.R."), (CBS)
  • Alan Alda for M*A*S*H, (Episode: "Bulletin Board"), (CBS)
  • Hy Averback for M*A*S*H,, (Episode: "Alcoholics Unanimous"), (CBS)
  • Bill Bain for Upstairs Downstairs, (Episode: "A Sudden Storm"), (PBS)
  • Harry Falk for The Streets of San Francisco, (Episode: "The Mask of Death"), (ABC)
  • David Friedkin for Kojak, (Episode: "Cross Your Heart and Hope to Die"), (CBS)
  • Glenn Jordan for Benjamin Franklin, (Episode: "The Ambassador"), (CBS)
  • Telly Savalas for Kojak, (Episode: "I Want to Report a Dream..."), (CBS)
Outstanding Directing in a Comedy-Variety or Music Special Outstanding Directing in a Special Program – Drama or Comedy
Outstanding Directing in a Comedy-Variety or Music Series

Writing

Outstanding Writing in a Comedy Series Outstanding Writing in a Drama Series
  • Howard Fast for Benjamin Franklin, (Episode: "The Ambassador"), (CBS)
  • Robert L. Collins, for Police Story, (Episode: "Roberry: 48 Hours"), (NBC)
  • John Hawkesworth for Upstairs, Downstairs, (Episode: "The Bolter"), (PBS)
  • Loring Mandel for Benjamin Franklin, (Episode: "The Whirlwind"), (CBS)
  • Alfred Shaughnessy for Upstairs, Downstairs, (Episode: "Miss Forrest"), (PBS)
Outstanding Writing in a Comedy-Variety or Music Special Outstanding Writing in a Comedy-Variety or Music Series
  • Shirley MacLaine: If They Could See Me Now, (CBS)
  • Lily, (ABC)
  • The Carol Burnett Show, (CBS)
  • Cher, (CBS)
Outstanding Writing in a Special Program – Drama or Comedy – Original Teleplay Outstanding Writing in a Special Program – Drama or Comedy – Adaptation
  • James Costigan for Love Among the Ruins, (ABC)
  • Stanley R. Greenberg for The Missiles of October, (ABC)
  • Fay Kanin, for Hustling, (ABC)
  • Jerome Kass, for Queen of the Stardust Ballroom, (CBS)
  • Joel Oliansky, William Sackheim, for The Law, (NBC)
  • David W. Rintels for Clarence Darrow, (NBC)
  • Edward Anhalt for QB VII, (ABC)

Most major nominations

By network [note 1]
By program

Most major awards

By network [note 1]
By program
Notes
  1. 1 2 "Major" constitutes the categories listed above: Program, Acting, Directing, and Writing. Does not include the technical categories.

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