45th Primetime Emmy Awards

Last updated
45th Primetime Emmy Awards
Seinfeld cast on stage after win (211282673).jpg
Jerry Seinfeld speaking on behalf of the cast and crew of Seinfeld while accepting
Outstanding Comedy Series
Date
  • September 19, 1993
    (Ceremony)
  • September 18, 1993
    (Creative Arts Awards)
Location Pasadena Civic Auditorium, Pasadena, California
Presented by Academy of Television Arts and Sciences
Hosted by Angela Lansbury
Highlights
Most awards
Most nominations Northern Exposure (11)
Outstanding Comedy Series Seinfeld
Outstanding Drama Series Picket Fences
Outstanding Miniseries Prime Suspect II
Outstanding Variety, Music or Comedy Series Saturday Night Live
Television/radio coverage
Network ABC

The 45th Primetime Emmy Awards were held on Sunday, September 19, 1993. The ceremony was broadcast on ABC and was hosted by Angela Lansbury. MTV received its first major nomination at this ceremony.

Contents

For its fourth season, Seinfeld won its first, and only, Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Comedy Series. Cheers was once again nominated for Outstanding Comedy Series. It was nominated for all eleven years that it ran and won four times. This tied the record set by M*A*S*H which also went 11/11, but only won once.

On the drama side, Northern Exposure was the defending champion and was seen heavily as the favorite coming into the ceremony being the most nominated show with 11 major nominations—but in a major upset, Picket Fences took home Outstanding Drama Series. Northern Exposure set the dubious record for the largest shutout of all time, as it lost all 11 major nominations; including its Creative Arts Emmy Awards nominations, the record increases to 0/16. This record would later be tied by The Larry Sanders Show in 1997, but both of these records were later broken by Mad Men (0/17) in 2012, and again by The Handmaid's Tale (0/21) in 2021.

With David Clennon's win for Outstanding Comedy Guest Actor, this was the first time HBO won an Acting Emmy.

Winners and nominees

[1]

Programs

Outstanding Comedy Series Outstanding Drama Series
Outstanding Variety, Music or Comedy Series Outstanding Variety, Music or Comedy Special
Outstanding Made for Television Movie Outstanding Miniseries

Acting

Lead performances

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a Special Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Special

Supporting performances

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
  • Chad Lowe as Jesse McKenna on Life Goes On (Episodes: "Lost Weekend" + "Bedfellows"), (ABC)
    • Barry Corbin as Maurice J. Minnifield on Northern Exposure (Episodes: "The Big Feast" + "Sleeping with the Enemy"), (CBS)
    • John Cullum as Holling Vincoeur on Northern Exposure (Episodes: "Learning Curve" + "Mud and Blood"), (CBS)
    • Fyvush Finkel as Douglas Wambaugh on Picket Fences (Episodes: "Thanksgiving" + "The Body Politic"), (CBS)
    • Dean Stockwell as Al Calavicci on Quantum Leap (Episodes: "Lee Harvey Oswald: October 5, 1957 – November 22, 1963" + "Killin' Time: June 18, 1958"), (NBC)
  • Mary Alice as Marguerite Peck on I'll Fly Away (Episodes: "Ruler of My Heart" + "The Third Man"), (NBC)
    • Cynthia Geary as Shelly Tambo on Northern Exposure (Episodes: "Kaddish for Uncle Manny" + "Mud and Blood"), (CBS)
    • Kay Lenz as Maggie Zombro on Reasonable Doubts (Episodes: "Two Women" + "Wish You Were Here"), (NBC)
    • Kellie Martin as Becca Thatcher on Life Goes On (Episodes: "Visions" + "Last Wish"), (ABC)
    • Peg Phillips as Ruth Anne on Northern Exposure (Episodes: "Blowing Bubbles" + "Revelations"), (CBS)
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or a Special Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Special

Guest performances

Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series
  • David Clennon as Peter Brewer on Dream On (Episode: "For Peter's Sake"), (HBO)
    • Tom Berenger as Don Santry on Cheers (Episode: "One for the Road"), (NBC)
    • Dana Carvey as Himself on The Larry Sanders Show (Episode: "Guest Host"), (HBO)
    • Bill Erwin as Sid Fields on Seinfeld (Episode: "The Old Man"), (NBC)
    • Joel Grey as Jacob on Brooklyn Bridge (Episode: "The Last Immigrant"), (CBS)
  • Tracey Ullman as Dava Levine on Love & War (Episode: "The Prima Dava"), (CBS)
    • Carol Burnett as Herself on The Larry Sanders Show (Episode: "The Spider Episode"), (HBO)
    • Ruby Dee as Aurelia Danforth on Evening Shade (Episode: "They Can't Take That Away From Me"), (CBS)
    • Shelley Long as Diane Chambers on Cheers (Episode: "One for the Road"), (NBC)
    • Gwen Verdon as Kitty on Dream On (Episode: "For Peter's Sake"), (HBO)
Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series
  • Laurence Fishburne as Martin McHenry on TriBeCa (Episode: "The Box"), (Fox)
    • Adam Arkin as Adam on Northern Exposure (Episode: "The Big Feast"), (CBS)
    • John Glover as Dennis Atwood on Crime & Punishment (Episode: "Best Laid Plans"), (NBC)
    • Michael Jeter as Peter Lebeck on Picket Fences (Episode: "Frog Man"), (CBS)
    • Richard Kiley as Hayden Langston on Picket Fences (Episode: "Thanksgiving"), (CBS)

Directing

Outstanding Individual Achievement in Directing in a Comedy Series Outstanding Individual Achievement in Directing in a Drama Series
  • Betty Thomas, for Dream On (Episode: "For Peter's Sake"), (HBO)
    • Peter Bonerz, for Murphy Brown (Episode: "You Say Potatoe, I Say Potato"), (CBS)
    • James Burrows for Cheers (Episode: "One for the Road"), (NBC)
    • Tom Cherones for Seinfeld (Episode: "The Contest"), (NBC)
    • Eric Laneuville for Dream On (Episode: "And Bimbo Was His Name-O"), (HBO)
Outstanding Individual Achievement in Directing in a Variety or Music Program Outstanding Individual Achievement in Directing for a Miniseries or a Special
  • Walter C. Miller for The 46th Annual Tony Awards, (ABC)
    • Robert Altman for Great Performances (Episode: "Black and Blue"), (PBS)
    • Hal Gurnee for Late Night with David Letterman, (NBC)
    • Jeff Margolis for The 65th Annual Academy Awards, (ABC)

Writing

Outstanding Individual Achievement in Writing in a Comedy Series Outstanding Individual Achievement in Writing in a Drama Series
  • Tom Fontana for Homicide: Life on the Street (Episode: "Three Men and Adena"), (NBC)
    • Bernard Lechowick for Homefront (Episode: "The Lacemakers"), (ABC)
    • Jeff Melvoin for Northern Exposure (Episode: "Kaddish for Uncle Manny"), (CBS)
    • Robert Nathan, Walon Green for Law & Order (Episode: "Manhood"), (NBC)
    • Geoffrey Neigher for Northern Exposure (Episode: "Midnight Sun"), (CBS)
Outstanding Individual Achievement in Writing in a Variety or Music Program Outstanding Individual Achievement in Writing in a Miniseries or a Special
  • Jane Anderson for The Positively True Adventures of the Alleged Texas Cheerleader-Murdering Mom, (HBO)

Most major nominations

By network [note 1]
By program

Most major awards

By network [note 1]
By program
Notes
  1. 1 2 "Major" constitutes the categories listed above: Program, Acting, Directing, and Writing. Does not include the technical categories.

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