26th Primetime Emmy Awards

Last updated
26th Primetime Emmy Awards
DateMay 28, 1974
Location Pantages Theatre,
Los Angeles, California
Presented by Academy of Television Arts and Sciences
Hosted by Johnny Carson
Television/radio coverage
Network NBC

The 26th Emmy Awards, later known as the 26th Primetime Emmy Awards, were handed out on May 28, 1974. The ceremony was hosted by Johnny Carson. Winners are listed in bold and networks are in parentheses.

Contents

The top shows of the night were M*A*S*H and Upstairs, Downstairs . M*A*S*H and Mary Tyler Moore had the most major nominations with ten. Two show led the night with five major wins, The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman , and Mary Tyler Moore.

For this ceremony, individual awards dubbed "Super Emmys" were given out in addition to the traditional categories. The individual categories were dropped the following year and have not returned since.

Winners and nominees

[1]

Programs

Outstanding Comedy Series Outstanding Drama Series
Outstanding Music-Variety Series Outstanding Comedy-Variety, Variety or Music Special
Outstanding Special – Comedy or Drama Outstanding Limited Series

Acting

Lead performances

Best Lead Actor in a Comedy Series Best Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Best Lead Actor in a Drama Series Best Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Best Lead Actor in a DramaBest Lead Actress in a Drama
Best Lead Actor in a Limited Series Best Lead Actress in a Limited Series

Supporting performances

Best Supporting Actor in Comedy Best Supporting Actress in Comedy
Best Supporting Actor in Drama Best Supporting Actress in Drama

Directing

Best Directing in Comedy Best Directing in Drama – Single Program of a Series with Continuing Characters and/or Theme
  • Jackie Cooper for M*A*S*H, (Episode: "Carry on, Hawkeye"), (CBS)
    • Gene Reynolds for M*A*S*H, (Episode: "Deal Me Out"), (CBS)
    • Jay Sandrich for Mary Tyler Moore, (Episode: "Lou's First Date"), (CBS)
  • Robert Butler for The Blue Knight, (Episode: "Part III"), (NBC)
    • Harry Harris for The Waltons, (Episode: "The Journey"), (CBS)
    • Philip Leacock for The Waltons, (Episode: "The Thanksgiving Story"), (CBS)
Best Directing in Comedy-Variety, Variety or MusicBest Directing in Drama – Single Program – Comedy or Drama
Best Directing in Variety or Music
  • Dave Powers for The Carol Burnett Show, (CBS)
    • Art Fisher for The Sonny & Cher Comedy Hour, (CBS)
    • Joshua White for In Concert Cat Stevens: Moon & Star, (ABC)

Writing

Best Writing in Comedy Best Writing in Drama
  • Joanna Lee for The Waltons, (Episode: "The Thanksgiving Story"), (CBS)
    • Gene R. Kearney, for Kojak, (Episode: "Death is Not a Passing Grade"), (CBS)
    • John McGreevey for The Waltons, (Episode: "The Easter Story"), (CBS)
Best Writing in Comedy-Variety, Variety or Music Best Writing in Variety or Music
  • Lily, (CBS)
    • Barbra Streisand and Other Musical Instruments, (CBS)
    • Paradise, (CBS)
  • The Carol Burnett Show, (CBS)
    • The Carol Burnett Show, (CBS)
    • The Sonny & Cher Comedy Hour, (CBS)
Best Writing in Drama – Original TeleplayBest Writing in Drama – Adaptation

Super Emmys

Acting

Actor of the Year – Series Actor of the Year – Special
  • Alan Alda as Hawkeye Pierce on M*A*S*H, (CBS)
  • Hal Holbrook as Capt. Lloyd Bucher on Pueblo, (ABC)
Actress of the Year – Series Actress of the Year – Special
  • Mary Tyler Moore as Mary Richards on Mary Tyler Moore, (CBS)
  • Cicely Tyson as Jane Pittman on The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman, (CBS)
Supporting Actor of the Year Supporting Actress of the Year
  • Michael Moriarty as Jim O'Connor on The Glass Menagerie, (ABC)
  • Joanna Miles as Laura Wingfield on The Glass Menagerie, (ABC)

Directing

Director of the Year – SeriesDirector of the Year – Special
  • Robert Butler for The Blue Knight, (Episode: "Part III"), (NBC)
  • Dwight Hemion for Barbra Streisand and Other Musical Instruments, (CBS)

Writing

Writer of the Year – SeriesWriter of the Year – Special
  • Treva Silverman for Mary Tyler Moore, (Episode: "The Lou And Edie Story"), (CBS)
  • Fay Kanin for Tell Me Where it Hurts, (CBS)

Most major nominations

By network [note 1]
By program

Most major awards

By network [note 1]
By program
Notes
  1. 1 2 "Major" constitutes the categories listed above: Program, Acting, Directing, and Writing. Does not include the technical categories.

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