30th Primetime Emmy Awards

Last updated
30th Primetime Emmy Awards
Date
  • September 17, 1978
    (Ceremony)
  • September 9, 1978
    (Creative Arts Awards)
Location Pasadena Civic Auditorium, Pasadena, California
Presented by Academy of Television Arts and Sciences
Hosted by Alan Alda
Highlights
Most awards All in the Family
Holocaust (6)
Most nominationsHolocaust (11)
Outstanding Comedy Series All in the Family
Outstanding Drama Series The Rockford Files
Outstanding Limited Series Holocaust
Outstanding Comedy-Variety or Music Series The Muppet Show
Television/radio coverage
Network CBS

The 30th Primetime Emmy Awards were held on September 17, 1978. The ceremony was broadcast on CBS, from the Pasadena Civic Auditorium, Pasadena, California.

Contents

The top shows of the night were All in the Family which won its then record fourth Emmy for Outstanding Comedy Series, and The Rockford Files . CBS continued its streak of dominance by winning its eighth straight Emmy for Outstanding Comedy Series, this record still stands. Actor Will Geer received three posthumous acting nominations for three different performances, but lost in each category.

For the first time in Emmy history, two shows won six major awards, All in the Family became the first show to win six major awards twice, and the miniseries Holocaust tied the record for most wins by a miniseries set the previous year by Roots .

This ceremony was interrupted for thirty minutes by a nationally televised address by then-President Jimmy Carter, joined by then-Israeli prime minister Menachem Begin and then-Egyptian president Anwar Sadat in which President Carter announced the signing of the Camp David Accords.

Rita Moreno's win made her the third person to become an EGOT.

Winners and nominees

[1]

Programs

Outstanding Comedy Series Outstanding Drama Series
Outstanding Comedy-Variety or Music Series Outstanding Special - Comedy-Variety or Music
  • Bette Midler: Ol' Red Hair is Back, (NBC)
    • The George Burns One-Man Show, (CBS)
    • Neil Diamond: I'm Glad You're Here with Me Tonight, (NBC)
    • The Second Barry Manilow Special, (ABC)
    • World of Magic, (NBC)
Outstanding Special - Drama or Comedy Outstanding Limited Series

Acting

Lead performances

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama or Comedy Special Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama or Comedy Special
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series

Supporting performances

Outstanding Continuing Performance by a Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Continuing Performance by a Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Continuing Performance by a Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Continuing Performance by a Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Performance by a Supporting Actor in a Comedy or Drama Special Outstanding Performance by a Supporting Actress in a Comedy or Drama Special

Single performances

Outstanding Lead Actor for a Single Appearance in a Drama or Comedy SeriesOutstanding Lead Actress for a Single Appearance in a Drama or Comedy Series
  • Barnard Hughes as Judge Felix Rushman on Lou Grant, (Episode: "Judge"), (CBS)
    • Will Geer as Franklyn Bootherstone on The Love Boat , (Episode: "The Old Man and the Runaway"), (ABC)
    • David Cassidy as Officer Dan Shay on Police Story , (Episode: "A Chance to Live"), (NBC)
    • Judd Hirsch as Mike Andretti on Rhoda, (Episode: "Rhoda Likes Mike"), (CBS)
    • John Rubinstein as Jeff Maitland on Family, (Episode: "And Baby Makes Three"), (ABC)
    • Keenan Wynn as Ben Fletcher on Police Woman , (Episode: "Good Old Uncle Ben"), (NBC)
Outstanding Single Performance
by a Supporting Actor in a Comedy or Drama Series
Outstanding Single Performance
by a Supporting Actress in a Comedy or Drama Series
  • Ricardo Montalban as Satangkai on How the West Was Won, (Episode: "Part II"), (ABC)
    • Will Geer as Santa Claus on Eight is Enough , (Episode: "Yes, Nicholas... There is a Santa Claus"), (ABC)
    • Larry Gelman as Edward Sellers on Barney Miller, (Episode: "Goodbye, Mr. Fish"), (ABC)
    • Harold Gould as Martin Morgenstern on Rhoda, (Episode: "Happy Anniversary"), (CBS)
    • Abe Vigoda as Det. Phil Fish on Barney Miller, (Episode: "Goodbye, Mr. Fish"), (ABC)

Directing

Outstanding Directing in a Comedy Series Outstanding Directing in a Drama Series
Outstanding Directing in a Comedy-Variety or Music Special Outstanding Directing in a Special Program - Drama or Comedy
Outstanding Directing in a Comedy-Variety or Music Series

Writing

Outstanding Writing in a Comedy Series Outstanding Writing in a Drama Series
  • Bob Weiskopf, Bob Schiller, Barry Harman, Harve Brosten for All in the Family, (Episode: "Cousin Liz"), (CBS)
    • Alan Alda for M*A*S*H, (Episode: "Fallen Idol"), (CBS)
    • Mel Tolkin, Larry Rhine, Erik Tarloff for All in the Family, (Episode: "Edith's Crisis of Faith, Part 2"), (ABC)
    • Bob Weiskopf, Bob Schiller for All in the Family, (Episode: "Edith's 50th Birthday"), (CBS)
Outstanding Writing in a Comedy-Variety or Music Special Outstanding Writing in a Comedy-Variety or Music Series
  • The Paul Simon Special, (NBC)
    • The Second Barry Manilow Special, (ABC)
    • Bette Midler: Ol' Red Hair Is Back, (NBC)
    • The George Burns One-Man Show, (CBS)
    • The Sentry Collection Presents Ben Vereen: His Roots, (ABC)
  • The Carol Burnett Show, (CBS)
    • America 2-Night, (Syndicated)
    • The Carol Burnett Show, (CBS)
    • The Muppet Show, (Syndicated)
    • Saturday Night Live, (NBC)
Outstanding Writing in a Special Program - Drama or Comedy - Original Teleplay Outstanding Writing in a Special Program - Drama or Comedy - Adaptation
  • George Rubino for The Last Tenant, (ABC)

Most major nominations

By network [note 1]
By program

Most major awards

By network [note 1]
By program
Notes
  1. 1 2 "Major" constitutes the categories listed above: Program, Acting, Directing, and Writing. Does not include the technical categories.

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