28th Primetime Emmy Awards

Last updated
28th Primetime Emmy Awards
DateMay 17, 1976
Location Shubert Theatre,
Los Angeles, California
Presented by Academy of Television Arts and Sciences
Hosted by John Denver
Mary Tyler Moore
Highlights
Most awards The Mary Tyler Moore Show (5)
Most nominations Rich Man, Poor Man (10)
Outstanding Comedy Series The Mary Tyler Moore Show
Outstanding Drama Series Police Story
Outstanding Limited Series Upstairs, Downstairs
Outstanding Comedy-Variety or Music Series NBC's Saturday Night
Television/radio coverage
Network ABC

The 28th Primetime Emmy Awards were handed out on May 17, 1976. The ceremony was hosted by John Denver and Mary Tyler Moore. Winners are listed in bold with series' networks in parentheses. As of 2019, this was the last Emmy Awards ceremonies held during the first half of a calendar year.

Contents

The top show of the night was Mary Tyler Moore which won its second straight Outstanding Comedy Series award, and five major awards overall. Police Story , won Outstanding Drama Series, even though it only received one major nomination.

The television miniseries Rich Man, Poor Man set numerous records. It received 17 major nominations, breaking the record held by Playhouse 90 which was set in 1959 (since broken). It also received 13 acting nominations, although some of the acting categories at this ceremony were later eliminated or combined. Despite this, it lost Outstanding Limited Series to Upstairs, Downstairs .

The Shubert Theatre had previously hosted the 1973 Emmy ceremony; it would host the ceremony a third and final time in 2001.

Winners and nominees

[1]

Programs

Outstanding Comedy Series Outstanding Drama Series
Outstanding Comedy-Variety or Music Series Outstanding Special - Comedy-Variety or Music
Outstanding Special - Drama or Comedy Outstanding Limited Series

Acting

Lead performances

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Special Program - Drama or Comedy Outstanding Lead Actress in a Special Program - Drama or Comedy
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series

Supporting performances

Outstanding Continuing Performance by a Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Continuing Performance by a Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Continuing Performance by a Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Continuing Performance by a Supporting Actress in a Drama Series

Single performances

Outstanding Lead Actor for a Single Appearance in a Drama or Comedy SeriesOutstanding Lead Actress for a Single Appearance in a Drama or Comedy Series
  • Edward Asner as Axel Jordache on Rich Man, Poor Man, (ABC)
Outstanding Single Performance
by a Supporting Actor in a Comedy or Drama Special
Outstanding Single Performance
by a Supporting Actress in a Comedy or Drama Special
Outstanding Single Performance
by a Supporting Actor in a Comedy or Drama Series
Outstanding Single Performance
by a Supporting Actress in a Comedy or Drama Series
  • Gordon Jackson as Hudson on Upstairs, Downstairs, (Episode: "The Beastly Hun"), (PBS)
    • Bill Bixby as Willie Abbott on Rich Man, Poor Man, (ABC)
    • Roscoe Lee Browne as Charlie Jeffers on Barney Miller, (Episode: "The Escape Artist"), (ABC)
    • Norman Fell as Smitty on Rich Man, Poor Man, (ABC)
    • Van Johnson as Marsh Goodwin on Rich Man, Poor Man, (ABC)
  • Fionnula Flanagan as Clothilde on Rich Man, Poor Man, (ABC)
    • Kim Darby as Virginia Calderwood on Rich Man, Poor Man, (CBS)
    • Ruth Gordon as Carlton's Mother on Rhoda, (Episode: "Kiss Your Epaulets Goodbye"), (CBS)
    • Kay Lenz as Kate Jordache on Rich Man, Poor Man, (ABC)

Directing

Outstanding Directing in a Comedy Series Outstanding Directing in a Drama Series
  • David Greene for Rich Man, Poor Man, (Episode: "Episode 8"), (ABC)
    • Fielder Cook for Beacon Hill, (Episode: "Pilot"), (CBS)
    • Christopher Hodson for Upstairs, Downstairs, (Episode: "Women Shall Not Weep"), (PBS)
    • James Cellan Jones for Jennie: Lady Randolph Churchill, (Episode: "Part IV"), (PBS)
    • Boris Sagal for Rich Man, Poor Man, (Episode: "Episode 8"), (ABC)
    • George Schaefer for Lincoln, (Episode: "Crossing Fox River"), (NBC)
Outstanding Directing in a Comedy-Variety or Music Special Outstanding Directing in a Special Program - Drama or Comedy
Outstanding Directing in a Comedy-Variety or Music Series

Writing

Outstanding Writing in a Comedy Series Outstanding Writing in a Drama Series
  • Sherman Yellen for The Adams Chronicles, (Episode: "John Adams, Lawyer"), (PBS)
    • Julian Mitchell, for Jennie: Lady Randolph Churchill, (PBS)
    • Joel Oliansky for The Law, (Episode: "Complaint Amended"), (NBC)
    • Dean Riesner for Rich Man, Poor Man, (ABC)
    • Alfred Shaughnessy for Upstairs, Downstairs, (Episode: "Another Year"), (PBS)
Outstanding Writing in a Comedy-Variety or Music Special Outstanding Writing in a Comedy-Variety or Music Series
  • The Lily Tomlin Special, (ABC)
    • Gypsy in My Soul, (CBS)
    • Mitzi... Roarin' in the 20's, (CBS)
    • Van Dyke and Company, (NBC)
  • NBC's Saturday Night, (NBC)
    • The Carol Burnett Show, (CBS)
    • The Sonny and Cher Show, (CBS)
Outstanding Writing in a Special Program - Drama or Comedy - Original Teleplay Outstanding Writing in a Special Program - Drama or Comedy - Adaptation

Most major nominations

By network [note 1]
By program

Most major awards

By network [note 1]
By program
Notes
  1. 1 2 "Major" constitutes the categories listed above: Program, Acting, Directing, and Writing. Does not include the technical categories.

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