7th Primetime Emmy Awards

Last updated
7th Primetime Emmy Awards
DateMarch 7, 1955
LocationMoulin Rouge Nightclub, Los Angeles, California
Presented by Academy of Television Arts and Sciences
Hosted by Steve Allen
Television/radio coverage
Network NBC

The 7th Emmy Awards, later referred to as the 7th Primetime Emmy Awards, were held on March 7, 1955, to honor the best in television of the year. The ceremony was held at the "Moulin Rouge Nightclub" in Hollywood, California. The ceremony, hosted by Steve Allen and broadcast on NBC, was the first Emmy Awards ceremony to be televised nationally. All nominations are listed, with winners in bold and series' networks are in parentheses. New categories for this ceremony included awards for writing and directing, as well as one-time performances in anthology series, (this category would eventually morph into the current guest-acting category). Studio One was the most successful show of the night, winning three awards.

Contents

Fredric March made Emmy history when he became the first actor to be nominated for two different works in the same category. However, he lost for both of his performances in the category of Best Actor in a Single Performance.

Winners and nominees

[1]

Programs

Best Situation Comedy Best Dramatic Program
Best Variety Series including Musical Varieties Best Audience, Guest Participation, or Panel Program
Best Mystery or Intrigue SeriesBest Children's Program
Best Cultural, Religious, or Educational ProgramBest Sports Program
Best Western or Adventure SeriesBest Daytime Program
Best Individual Program of the Year

Acting

Lead performances

Best Actor Starring a Regular SeriesBest Actress Starring in a Regular Series

Supporting performances

Best Supporting Actor in a Regular SeriesBest Supporting Actress in a Regular Series

Single performances

Best Actor in a Single PerformanceBest Actress in a Single Performance

Directing

Best Direction

Writing

Best Written Comedy Material Best Written Dramatic Material
  • Reginald Rose for Studio One, (Episode: "Twelve Angry Men"), (CBS)
    • Paddy Chayefsky for The Philco Television Playhouse, (NBC)
    • David Dortort for Climax!, (Episode: "An Error in Chemistry"), (CBS)
    • Leonard Freeman for Four Star Playhouse, (Episode: "The Answer"), (CBS)
    • James Moser for Medic, (Episode: "White is the Color"), (NBC)

Hosting

Best News Reporter or CommentatorMost Outstanding New Personality

Singing

Best Male SingerBest Female Singer

Most major nominations

By network [note 1]
By program

Most major awards

By network [note 1]
By program
Notes
  1. 1 2 "Major" constitutes the categories listed above: Program, Acting, Directing, and Writing. Does not include the technical categories.

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