Ellen Burstyn

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Awards and nominations

Burstyn is one of the few living actors to have won the Triple Crown of Acting which is the Oscar, Emmy, and Tony. She won the Academy Award in 1975 for her performance in Martin Scorsese's Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore . That same year, she won the Tony Award for Same Time, Next Year . (She would reprise her role in the film version in 1978.) Burstyn then completed the triple crown, winning the Primetime Emmy Award for her guest starring role on Law and Order: SVU (2009).

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Ellen Burstyn
Ellen Burstyn at the 2009 Tribeca Film Festival.jpg
Burstyn at the 2009 Tribeca Film Festival
Born
Edna Rae Gillooly

(1932-12-07) December 7, 1932 (age 89)
Other namesEllen McRae
OccupationActress
Years active1955–present
Works Full list
Spouse(s)
William Alexander
(m. 1950;div. 1957)

Paul Roberts
(m. 1958;div. 1961)

(m. 1964;div. 1972)
Children1
Awards Full list
10th President of the Actors' Equity Association
In office
1982–1985
Preceded by President of the Actors Studio
1994–present
With: Al Pacino
and Harvey Keitel
Succeeded by
Incumbent
Preceded by
Lee Strasberg (1982)
Carlin Glynn (2007)
Lee Grant (2007)
Artistic Director of the Actors Studio
1982–1988
2007–present
With: Al Pacino (1982)
Succeeded by
Frank Corsaro (1988)
Incumbent