The A.V. Club

Last updated

The A.V. Club
The A.V. Club logo.svg
Type Popular culture, entertainment, news, reviews, politics, progressive
FormatInternet
Owner(s) G/O Media
Editor-in-chiefScott Robson [1]
Founded1993;31 years ago (1993)
LanguageEnglish
Headquarters Chicago, Illinois, U.S.
Website avclub.com

The A.V. Club is an online newspaper [2] and entertainment website featuring reviews, interviews, and other articles that examine films, music, television, books, games, and other elements of pop-culture media. The A.V. Club was created in 1993 as a supplement to its satirical parent publication, The Onion . While it was a part of The Onion's 1996 website launch, The A.V. Club had minimal presence on the website at that point.

Contents

A 2005 website redesign placed The A.V. Club in a more prominent position, allowing its online identity to grow. Unlike The Onion, The A.V. Club and other sites owned by G/O Media are not satirical. [3] The publication's name is a reference to audiovisual (AV) clubs typical of American high schools. [4]

History

In 1993, five years after the founding of The Onion, Stephen Thompson, a student at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, launched an entertainment section of the newspaper. [5]

"A.V. Club" is for "audiovisual club". In the United States in the late 20th century, many high schools would have clubs for students who wanted to use and learn about speakers, projectors, and other early video and audio equipment. [6]

In 1996, both The Onion and The A.V. Club debuted on the Internet. [7] The A.V. Club was originally a subsection [8] of the main theonion.com domain name.[ citation needed ]

The supplement was moved to its own domain name, theavclub.com, [9] before the 2005 acquisition of the shorter avclub.com domain name. [10] The latter change coincided with a redesign that incorporated reader comments and blog content. In 2006, the website shifted its content model again to add content on a daily, rather than weekly, basis. Some contributors have become established as freelance writers and editors.[ citation needed ]

In December 2004, Stephen Thompson left his position as founding editor of The A.V. Club. [11]

According to Sean Mills, then-president of The Onion, the A.V. Club website first reached more than 1 million unique visitors in October 2007. [12] In late 2009, the website was reported to have received more than 1.4 million unique visitors and 75,000 comments per month. [13]

At its peak, the print version of The A.V. Club was available in 17 different cities. [14] Localized sections of the website were also maintained, with reviews and news relevant to specific cities. The print version and localized websites were gradually discontinued, and in December 2013, print publication ceased production in the last three markets. [15]

2012–2014 staff departures

On 13 December 2012, long-time writer and editor Keith Phipps, who oversaw the website after Stephen Thompson left, stepped down from his role as editor of The A.V. Club. He said, "Onion, Inc. and I have come to a mutual parting of the ways." [16] [17] [18]

On 2 April 2013, long-time film editor and critic Scott Tobias stepped down as film editor of The A.V. Club. He said via Twitter, "After 15 great years @theavclub, I step down as Film Editor next Friday." [19]

On 26 April 2013, long-time writers Nathan Rabin, Tasha Robinson, and Genevieve Koski announced they would also be leaving the website to begin work on a new project with Scott Tobias and Keith Phipps. [20] Koski also said that she would continue to write freelance articles. [21] Writer Noel Murray announced he would be joining their new project, but would also continue to contribute to The A.V. Club in a reduced capacity. [20] On 30 May 2013, those six writers were announced as becoming part of the senior staff of The Dissolve , a film website run by Pitchfork Media. [22]

In April and June 2014, senior staff writers Kyle Ryan, Sonia Saraiya, and Emily St. James [23] left the website for positions at Entertainment Weekly , Salon , and Vox Media, respectively. [24] [25] In 2015, Ryan returned to Onion, Inc. for a position in development. [26] Following his departure from The Dissolve earlier that month, Nathan Rabin returned to write freelance for the A.V. Club website in May 2015. [27] He renewed his regular column "My World of Flops" Archived 6 November 2013 at the Wayback Machine . The Dissolve folded in July 2015. [28]

Television series

On 16 February 2017, The A.V. Club's editor-at-large, John Teti, posted an article on the website announcing the upcoming release of a television series, titled The A.V. Club, based on the website. [29] The series, hosted by Teti, began airing on Fusion on 16 March 2017 and ran for one season. [30] The series featured news, criticism, and discussions about various popular-culture topics and featured staff members from the website.

Move to Univision, then G/O Media

In January 2016, Univision Communications acquired "a 40 percent, controlling stake" in Onion Inc., the parent company of The A.V. Club. [31] Later that year, Univision also purchased Gawker Media and reorganized several of Gawker's sites into the new Gizmodo Media Group, a division of Fusion Media Group. [32]

The site was subsequently migrated from Bulbs, an internal content management system developed by Onion Inc. to the Gawker-developed Kinja platform. [33] [34] It deleted the comment section and audience reviews hosted on the previous site. In July 2018, Univision announced it was looking for a buyer for the entire Gizmodo Group. [35]

In April 2019, Gizmodo and The Onion were sold to private-equity firm Great Hill Partners, which combined them into a new company named G/O Media. [36] In July 2019, executive editor Laura M. Browning and managing editor Caitlin PenzeyMoog left. [37] In early 2020, former People magazine and Entertainment Weekly editor Patrick Gomez was named editor-in-chief, and it was announced that the site was opening a Los Angeles bureau. [38] In August 2021, Yahoo! Entertainment and E! Online alum Scott Robson joined to lead the team. [39]

Onion Inc. Union

In March 2018 the employees of the company announced they had unionized with the Writers Guild Of America, East. [40] The union comprises "all of the creative staffs at Onion Inc.: The A.V. Club, The Onion, ClickHole, The Takeout, Onion Labs, and Onion Inc.'s video and art departments." [41] (ClickHole was subsequently acquired by Cards Against Humanity in February 2020. [42] ) The union was recognized on 20 April 2018 [43] and reached a contract agreement with management on 20 December 2018. [43] The contract includes "annual pay increases, minimum pay grades, strong diversity and anti-harassment language, just cause, union security, editorial independence, intellectual property rights, and an end to permalancers." [44]

2022 closure of Chicago office and staff departures

On 18 January 2022, the union representing staff at the website announced that all seven staff members based in Chicago had taken severance as opposed to accepting a mandatory move of work location to Los Angeles. [45] This predominantly affected the senior staff of the site and comprised the managing editor, film editor, TV editor, associate editor, senior writer, assistant editor, and editorial coordinator. [46]

Controversy

On 9 December 2010, the website ComicsComicsMag revealed a capsule review for the book Genius, Isolated: The Life and Art of Alex Toth had been fabricated. The book had not yet been published nor even completed by the authors. [47] After the review was removed, editor Keith Phipps posted an apology on the website, stating that the reporter assigned the review could not locate a copy of the book ("for obvious reasons"), so fabricated it. [48] Leonard Pierce, the author of the review, was terminated from his freelance role with the website. [49]

Books

Awards

In 2017, The A.V. Club won an Eisner Award for "Best Comics-related Periodical/Journalism" (for works published in 2016). [50] The award went to writers Oliver Sava, Caitlin Rosberg, Shea Hennum, and Tegan O'Neil. The award also went to editor Caitlin PenzeyMoog. [51]

A.V. Club year- and decade-end lists

Starting in 1999, only lists written by individual writers were published. Beginning in 2006, The A.V. Club began publishing website-consensus, year-end album and film rankings, together with lists created by individual writers. Additionally decade-end lists were published for the 2000s and 2010s. [52] [53]

Annual rankings for television began in 2010.

Album of the Year

YearArtistAlbumNationSource
2006 The Hold Steady Boys and Girls in America Flag of the United States.svg  United States [54]
2007 Arcade Fire Neon Bible Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada [55]
2008 TV on the Radio Dear Science Flag of the United States.svg  United States [56]
2009 Phoenix Wolfgang Amadeus Phoenix Flag of France.svg  France [57]
2010 Kanye West My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy Flag of the United States.svg  United States [58]
2011 Wye Oak Civilian Flag of the United States.svg  United States [59]
2012 Frank Ocean Channel Orange Flag of the United States.svg  United States [60]
2013 Kanye West Yeezus Flag of the United States.svg  United States [61]
2014 Angel Olsen Burn Your Fire for No Witness Flag of the United States.svg  United States [62]
2015 Kendrick Lamar To Pimp a Butterfly Flag of the United States.svg  United States [63]
2016 David Bowie Blackstar Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom [64]
2017 Kendrick Lamar DAMN. Flag of the United States.svg  United States [65]
2018 Beach House 7 Flag of the United States.svg  United States [66]
2019 FKA Twigs Magdalene Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom [67]
2020 Fiona Apple Fetch the Bolt Cutters Flag of the United States.svg  United States [68]
2021 Japanese Breakfast Jubilee Flag of the United States.svg  United States [69]
2022 Beyoncé Renaissance Flag of the United States.svg  United States [70]
2023 Olivia Rodrigo Guts Flag of the United States.svg  United States [71]

Film of the Year

YearDirectorFilmNationSource
2006 Alfonso Cuarón Children of Men Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico
[72]
2007 Joel and Ethan Coen No Country for Old Men Flag of the United States.svg  United States [73]
2008 Andrew Stanton WALL-E Flag of the United States.svg  United States [74]
2009 Kathryn Bigelow The Hurt Locker Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Flag of France.svg  France
[75]
2010 Debra Granik Winter's Bone Flag of the United States.svg  United States [76]
2011 Terrence Malick The Tree of Life Flag of the United States.svg  United States [77]
2012 Paul Thomas Anderson The Master Flag of the United States.svg  United States [78]
2013 Richard Linklater Before Midnight Flag of the United States.svg  United States [79]
2014 Richard Linklater Boyhood Flag of the United States.svg  United States [80]
2015 George Miller Mad Max: Fury Road Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
Flag of the United States.svg  United States
[81]
2016 Kenneth Lonergan Manchester by the Sea Flag of the United States.svg  United States [82]
2017 Sean Baker The Florida Project Flag of the United States.svg  United States [83]
2018 Lee Chang-dong Burning Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea [84]
2019 Martin Scorsese The Irishman Flag of the United States.svg  United States [85]
2020 Kelly Reichardt First Cow Flag of the United States.svg  United States [86]
2021 Wes Anderson The French Dispatch Flag of the United States.svg  United States [87]
2022 Todd Field Tár Flag of the United States.svg  United States [88]
2023 Celine Song Past Lives Flag of the United States.svg  United States [89]

Television Show of the Year

YearShowNetworkNationSource
2010 Breaking Bad AMC Flag of the United States.svg  United States [90]
2011 Louie FX Flag of the United States.svg  United States [91]
2012 Breaking Bad AMC Flag of the United States.svg  United States [92]
2013 Enlightened HBO Flag of the United States.svg  United States [93]
2014 Hannibal NBC Flag of the United States.svg  United States [94]
2015 Mad Men AMC Flag of the United States.svg  United States [95]
2016 The People v. O. J. Simpson: American Crime Story FX Flag of the United States.svg  United States [96]
2017 The Good Place NBC Flag of the United States.svg  United States [97]
2018 The Americans FX Flag of the United States.svg  United States [98]
2019 Fleabag Amazon Prime Video Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom [99]
2020 I May Destroy You HBO Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom [100]
2021 Succession HBO Flag of the United States.svg  United States [101]
2022 The Bear Hulu Flag of the United States.svg  United States [102]
2023 Succession HBO Flag of the United States.svg  United States [103]

Related Research Articles

<i>The Onion</i> American satire news organization

The Onion is an American digital media company and newspaper organization that publishes satirical articles on international, national, and local news. The company is based in Chicago but originated as a weekly print publication on August 29, 1988, in Madison, Wisconsin. The Onion began publishing online in early 1996. In 2007, they began publishing satirical news audio and video online as the Onion News Network. In 2013, The Onion ceased publishing its print edition and launched Onion Labs, an advertising agency.

Gawker was an American blog founded by Nick Denton and Elizabeth Spiers that was based in New York City and focused on celebrities and the media industry. According to SimilarWeb, the site had over 23 million visits per month as of 2015. Founded in 2002, Gawker was the flagship blog for Denton's Gawker Media. Gawker Media also managed other blogs such as Jezebel, io9, Deadspin and Kotaku.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Gawker Media</span> Former British-American online media company and blog network

Gawker Media LLC was an American online media company and blog network. It was founded by Nick Denton in October 2003 as Blogwire, and was based in New York City. Incorporated in the Cayman Islands, as of 2012, Gawker Media was the parent company for seven different weblogs and many subsites under them: Gawker.com, Deadspin, Lifehacker, Gizmodo, Kotaku, Jalopnik, and Jezebel. All Gawker articles are licensed on a Creative Commons attribution-noncommercial license. In 2004, the company renamed from Blogwire, Inc. to Gawker Media, Inc., and to Gawker Media LLC shortly after.

Kotaku is a video game website and blog that was originally launched in 2004 as part of the Gawker Media network. Notable former contributors to the site include Luke Smith, Cecilia D'Anastasio, Tim Rogers, and Jason Schreier.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Richard Ayoade</span> British comedian and actor (born 1977)

Richard Ayoade is a British comedian, actor, writer and director. He played the role of socially awkward IT technician Maurice Moss in Channel 4 sitcom The IT Crowd (2006–2013), for which he won the 2014 BAFTA for Best Male Comedy Performance.

James Joseph Mallon is an American television and film producer and writer, most notable for being executive producer of the Peabody Award-winning series Mystery Science Theater 3000 (MST3K). He is also president of the series' original production company, Best Brains, Inc., directed more than 75 episodes of MST3K, and played the role of Gypsy from the first season until Jack Frost in the middle of the eighth season.

Deadspin is a sports blog founded by Will Leitch in 2005 and based in Chicago. Previously owned by Gawker Media and Univision Communications, it is currently owned by G/O Media.

<i>Gizmodo</i> Design, technology, science, and science fiction website and blog

Gizmodo is a design, technology, science and science fiction website. It was originally launched as part of the Gawker Media network run by Nick Denton, and runs on the Kinja platform. Gizmodo also includes the sub-blogs io9 and Earther, which focus on pop-culture and environmentalism respectively. Since April 2019, Gizmodo is part of G/O Media, owned by private equity firm Great Hill Partners.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">TelevisaUnivision</span> Mexican-American media company

TelevisaUnivision is a Mexican-American media company headquartered in New York and Mexico City that owns American Spanish language broadcast network Univision and free-to-air channels in Mexico such as Las Estrellas, Canal 5, Foro, and NU9VE alongside a collection of specialty television channels and production studios. 45% of the company is held by the Mexican telecommunications and broadcasting company Grupo Televisa, which was a major programming partner for Univision until the company sold their content assets to Univision in 2022.

Jezebel is a US-based website featuring news and cultural commentary geared towards women. It was launched in 2007 by Gawker Media under the editorship of Anna Holmes as a feminist counterpoint to traditional women's magazines.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Nathan Rabin</span> American film and music critic (born 1976)

Nathan Rabin is an American film and music critic. Rabin was the first head writer for The A.V. Club, a position he held until he left the Onion organization in 2013. In 2013, Rabin became a staff writer for The Dissolve, a film website operated by Pitchfork Media. Two of his featured columns at The Dissolve were "Forgotbusters" and "Streaming University".

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Yana Gorskaya</span> Russian-American film editor

Yana Gorskaya is a Russian-American director, producer and film editor. She is best known for her work as director and co-executive producer of the TV series What We Do in the Shadows (2019) and her work in the editorial departments of nearly all of director Taika Waititi’s films, including Hunt for the Wilderpeople (2016),Thor: Ragnarok (2017), Jojo Rabbit (2019) and the feature version of What We Do in the Shadows (2014).

<span class="mw-page-title-main">El Rey Network</span> Television channel

El Rey Network is a media brand founded by Robert Rodriguez on December 15, 2013, that is currently owned in a joint venture with FactoryMade Ventures.

<i>Nathan for You</i> American television series

Nathan for You is an American docu-reality comedy television series starring Canadian comedian Nathan Fielder. The series was created by Fielder and Michael Koman and premiered on February 28, 2013, on the American cable television network Comedy Central. In the general premise of the series, Fielder plays a fictionalized off-kilter version of himself, trying to use his business background and life experiences to help struggling companies and people, frequently offering them outlandish strategies, parodying the methods of marketing and management consultants. Twenty-seven of the show's 32 episodes follow this structure as applied to one or more businesses in the Southern California area, with five others departing from the business advice format to showcase other comedic premises.

The Dissolve was a film review, news, and commentary website which was operated by Pitchfork and based in Chicago, Illinois. The site was focused on reviews, commentary, interviews, and news about contemporary and classic films. Its editor was Scott Tobias, the former editor in chief of The A.V. Club. Editorial director Keith Phipps announced The Dissolve's closure on July 8, 2015.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">The Red Throne</span> 47th episode of the 5th season of Adventure Time

"The Red Throne" is the forty-seventh episode of the fifth season of the American animated television series Adventure Time. The episode was storyboarded by Seo Kim and Somvilay Xayaphone, from a story by Kent Osborne, Pendleton Ward, Jack Pendarvis, and Adam Muto. It originally aired on Cartoon Network on February 10, 2014.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Fusion Media Group</span>

The Fusion Media Group is a division of Univision Communications. The company was launched in April 2016 after Univision bought out Disney's stake in Fusion through the Fusion Media Network joint venture between Univision & Disney-ABC. While Univision is focused on serving Hispanic America in Spanish, FMG is the company's multi-platform, English language division targeting young adults.

Gizmodo Media Group was an online media company and blog network formerly operated by Univision Communications in its Fusion Media Group division. The company was created from assets acquired from Gawker Media during its bankruptcy in 2016. In April 2019, Gizmodo and The Onion were sold to private equity firm Great Hill Partners, which combined them into a new company named G/O Media.

G/O Media Inc. is an American media holding company that owns and operates several digital media outlets, including Gizmodo, Kotaku, Jalopnik, Deadspin, The Root, The A.V. Club, The Takeout, The Onion, The Inventory, and Quartz.

James J. Spanfeller Jr. is an American media executive best known for running Forbes.com from 2001–2009. He is currently the CEO of G/O Media which consists primarily of sites that were previously part of Gawker Media. Spanfeller was hired by private equity firm Great Hill Partners to run the company after it was purchased from Univision. He is also a past Chairman of the IAB and longtime executive board member of Digital Content Next (DCN).

References

  1. "MG/O Media Announces New Editors In Chief Of AV Club, Gizmodo, Jezebel". Cision. 31 August 2021. Retrieved 14 September 2021.
  2. Castillo, Jay (14 December 2017). "This Photo Is The Perfect Example Of What Internet Will Look Like If Net Neutrality Loses". Inquisitr . Retrieved 30 August 2018.
  3. "About Us". The A.V. Club. 1 January 1988. Retrieved 23 March 2017.
  4. "About Us". The A.V. Club. 1 January 1988. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  5. "Stephen Thompson, Writer/Editor, NPR Music". NPR Music . NPR. Retrieved 23 July 2017.
  6. "About Us". The A.V. Club. 1 January 1988. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  7. "The Onion: America's Finest News Source". The Onion. 19 December 1996. Archived from the original on 31 December 1996. Retrieved 23 March 2017.
  8. "The ONION, Number One in News". 19 December 1996. Archived from the original on 19 December 1996. Retrieved 19 July 2018.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  9. "The Onion's A.V. Club | the Internet's Only Entertainment Guide". 30 September 2001. Archived from the original on 27 November 1999. Retrieved 19 July 2018.
  10. "Home | The A.V. Club". The A.V. Club. 6 August 2005. Archived from the original on 6 August 2005. Retrieved 13 August 2017.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  11. "Bio for Stephen Thompson, Editor, NPR Music". NPR. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  12. David Shankbone (24 November 2007). "An interview with 'America's Finest News Source'", Wikinews
  13. Johnson, Steve (27 October 2009). "Onion's A.V. Club is building up its brand". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 14 March 2010.
  14. Gilmer, Marcus (8 November 2013). "The Onion bids adieu to print". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on 19 April 2014. Retrieved 17 April 2014.
  15. Ryan, Kyle (8 November 2013). "The Onion & A.V. Club ending print publication next month". The A.V. Club. Retrieved 17 April 2014.
  16. Goodybyes & Hellos Untitled Keith Phipps Project, 13 December 2012
  17. Keith Phipps is no longer editor of The A.V. Club The A.V. Club, 14 December 2012
  18. Editor Keith Phipps Leaves The A.V. Club Criticwire, 13 December 2012
  19. "Scott Tobias Leaves A.V. Club, Site Looking For a New Film Editor", Criticwire, 2 April 2013
  20. 1 2 An Update from The A.V. Club The A.V. Club 26 April 2013
  21. Genevieve Koski [@GenevieveKoski] (26 April 2013). "To clarify: I'll still contribute as a freelancer whenever I can, but I am no longer an editor. So you can't blame me for mistakes anymore!" (Tweet). Archived from the original on 22 April 2017. Retrieved 13 December 2022 via Twitter.
  22. "Introducing The Dissolve, A New Film Site". Pitchfork. 31 May 2013. Retrieved 30 May 2013.
  23. St. James, Emily (3 June 2019). "On coming out as trans in Donald Trump's America". Vox. Archived from the original on 3 June 2019. Retrieved 24 June 2019.
  24. Adams, Sam (9 June 2014). "A.V. Club Exodus Continues as Todd VanDerWerff Becomes Vox's First Culture Editor". Indiewire. Retrieved 25 August 2015.
  25. Bazilian, Emma (21 April 2014). "Matt Bean staffs up at Entertainment Weekly". Adweek. Retrieved 25 August 2015.
  26. Ryan, Kyle (16 March 2015). "I know it might sound strange, but I believe you'll be coming back before too long". CMYKyle: Kyle Ryan's Shameless Self-Promotion. Retrieved 25 August 2015.
  27. Rabin, Nathan (25 August 2015). "Nathan Rabin • The A.V. Club". The A.V. Club. Retrieved 25 August 2015.
  28. Phipps, Keith (8 July 2015). "The End". The Dissolve. Retrieved 8 July 2015.
  29. Teti, John (16 February 2017). "The A.V. Club will soon exist in TV show form". The A.V. Club. Retrieved 23 March 2017.
  30. Hughes, William (15 March 2017). "The A.V. Club TV show debuts tomorrow night, on Fusion". The A.V. Club. Retrieved 15 March 2017.
  31. Folkenflik, David (19 January 2016). "Area Satirical Publication The Onion Sold To Univision (Seriously)". NPR.
  32. Villafañe, Veronica (22 September 2016). "Univision Rebrands Gawker Media As Gizmodo Media Group; Starts Translating Content For Univision.com". Forbes.
  33. Mullin, Benjamin (16 June 2017). "Kinja, the publishing system at the heart of Gawker, lives on under Univision". Poynter.
  34. Laura M. Browning and Sean O'Neal (23 August 2017). "Welcome (back) to The A.V. Club". The A.V. Club.
  35. "Hi, we're the A.V. Club, and we're for sale". 10 July 2018.
  36. Hayes, Dade (8 April 2019). "Univision Finalizes Sale Of Former Gawker Portfolio And The Onion To Private Equity Firm Great Hill Partners". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved 16 January 2020.
  37. Hays, Kali (26 July 2019). "The Media Carousel: A roundup of who's been hired, fired or maybe just jumped ship in media land recently". Women's Wear Daily. PMC. Retrieved 6 May 2020.
  38. "Patrick Gomez Named Editor-in-Chief, The A.V. Club, Reid To BDG Fashion Director". mediapost.com. Retrieved 16 January 2020.
  39. Media, G/O. "G/O Media Announces New Editors In Chief Of AV Club, Gizmodo, Jezebel". prnewswire.com (Press release). Retrieved 27 October 2021.
  40. "Staff of the satire website The Onion has unionized". AP NEWS. 29 March 2018. Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  41. Club, The A. V. (29 March 2018). "Onion Inc. has unionized". News. Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  42. "Cards Against Humanity Bought Clickhole". BuzzFeed News. Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  43. 1 2 Onion Inc Union [@OnionIncUnion] (20 December 2018). "We're proud to announce that the Onion Inc Union has a contract! We voted unanimously to ratify our first contract as a union under @wgaeast. We're incredibly happy. https://t.co/YufzA6KpIk" (Tweet). Archived from the original on 9 March 2021. Retrieved 13 December 2022 via Twitter.
  44. "Onion Inc. Ratifies First Contract with the Writers Guild of America, East | Press Room". Writers Guild of America, East. 20 December 2018. Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  45. Onion Inc Union [@OnionIncUnion] (18 January 2022). "UPDATE: The seven A.V. Club workers in Chicago have decided to take their union-contract-protected severances rather than move to L.A. without a cost-of-living adjustment. A statement from the union (1/X): https://t.co/IOUwuR0TWn" (Tweet). Archived from the original on 2 September 2022. Retrieved 13 December 2022 via Twitter.
  46. Onion Inc Union [@OnionIncUnion] (18 January 2022). "The A.V. Club will be losing its managing editor, film editor, TV editor, associate editor, senior writer, assistant editor, and editorial coordinator. These workers oversee the site's film, TV, music, comics, and books coverage, and are essential to its daily operations. 5/X" (Tweet). Archived from the original on 20 January 2022. Retrieved 13 December 2022 via Twitter.
  47. "The Most Amazing Review of the Year". Comics Comics. Archived from the original on 11 December 2010. Retrieved 9 December 2010.
  48. "An apology from The A.V. Club". The A.V. Club. Retrieved 9 December 2010.
  49. Kaufman, Rachel. "AV Club Writer Loses Gig After Faking Review". Adweek. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  50. "Awards: 2010-Present". Comic-Con. San Diego Comic Convention. 2 December 2012. Archived from the original on 13 February 2014. Retrieved 6 May 2020.
  51. Rife, Katie (22 July 2017). "Holy crap, The A.V. Club won an Eisner Award". The A.V. Club. Onion Inc. Retrieved 6 May 2020.
  52. "Best Of 2010 S – Pop culture news, movie, TV, music and gaming reviews". The A.V. Club. Retrieved 12 January 2020.
  53. "The best films of the '00s". The A.V. Club. 3 December 2009. Retrieved 12 January 2020.
  54. Bahn, Christopher (19 December 2006). "Best Music Of 2006   Article   The A.V. Club". Avclub.com. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  55. Bahn, Christopher (12 December 2007). "The best music of 2007   Article   The A.V. Club". Avclub.com. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  56. "The best music of 2008   Article   The A.V. Club". Avclub.com. 11 December 2008. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  57. "The top 25 albums of 2009   Best of   the A.V. Club". Avclub.com. 9 December 2009. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  58. Heller, Jason (8 December 2010). "The best music of 2010   Best of   The A.V. Club". Avclub.com. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  59. Eakin, Marah (6 December 2011). "The best music of 2011   Best of   The A.V. Club". Avclub.com. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  60. "The best music of 2012   Best of   The A.V. Club". Avclub.com. 11 December 2012. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  61. Adams, Erik (5 December 2013). "The 23 best albums of 2013   Best of   The A.V. Club". Avclub.com. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  62. Anthony, David (8 December 2014). "The 20 best albums of 2014   Best of   The A.V. Club". Avclub.com. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  63. "The 15 best albums of 2015". Avclub.com. 7 December 2015. Retrieved 16 December 2015.
  64. "The A.V. Club's 20 best albums of 2016". Avclub.com. 12 December 2016. Retrieved 12 December 2016.
  65. "The A.V. Club's 20 best albums of 2017". The A.V. Club. 7 December 2017. Retrieved 7 December 2017.
  66. "The A.V. Club's 20 best albums of 2018". The A.V. Club. 18 December 2018. Retrieved 19 December 2018.
  67. "The 20 best albums of 2019". The A.V. Club. 19 December 2019. Retrieved 19 December 2019.
  68. "The 20 best albums of 2020". The A.V. Club. 15 December 2020. Retrieved 15 December 2020.
  69. "The 20 best albums of 2021". The A.V. Club. 23 December 2021. Retrieved 25 December 2021.
  70. "Here Are the 30 Best Albums of 2022". The A.V. Club. 13 December 2022. Retrieved 12 December 2022.
  71. "The 27 best albums of 2023". The A.V. Club. 13 December 2023. Retrieved 20 December 2023.
  72. Murray, Noel (21 December 2006). "The Year In Film 2006   Article   The A.V. Club". Avclub.com. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  73. Murray, Noel (19 December 2007). "The Year In Film 2007   Best of   The A.V. Club". Avclub.com. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  74. Murray, Noel; Phipps, Keith; Rabin, Nathan; Robinson, Tasha; Tobias, Scott (17 December 2008). "The year in film 2008   Article   The A.V. Club". Avclub.com. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  75. Murray, Noel (17 December 2009). "The year in film 2009   Best of   The A.V. Club". Avclub.com. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  76. Murray, Noel (16 December 2010). "The best films of 2010   Best of   The A.V. Club". Avclub.com. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  77. Adams, Sam (13 December 2011). "Best films of 2011   Best of   The A.V. Club". Avclub.com. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  78. Adams, Sam (19 December 2012). "The best films of 2012   Best of   The A.V. Club". Avclub.com. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  79. Adams, Sam (17 December 2013). "The best films of 2013   Best of   The A.V. Club". Avclub.com. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  80. "The 20 best movies of 2014   Best of   The A.V. Club". Avclub.com. 18 December 2014. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  81. "The 20 best films of 2015". Avclub.com. 17 December 2015. Retrieved 17 December 2015.
  82. "The 20 best films of 2016". Avclub.com. 19 December 2015.
  83. "The 20 best films of 2017". Avclub.com. 20 December 2017. Retrieved 20 December 2017.
  84. "The best films of 2018". The A.V. Club. 19 December 2018. Retrieved 19 December 2018.
  85. "The best films of 2019". The A.V. Club. 16 December 2019.
  86. "The best films of 2020". The A.V. Club. 17 December 2020.
  87. "The best films of 2021". The A.V. Club. 21 December 2021.
  88. "The 30 best films of 2022 ranked, and don't try to fight us on this". The A.V. Club. 22 December 2022.
  89. "The 30 best films of 2023". The A.V. Club. 19 December 2023.
  90. Alston, Joshua (20 December 2010). "The 25 best television series of 2010   Best of   The A.V. Club". Avclub.com. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  91. "Best TV of 2011   Best of   The A.V. Club". Avclub.com. 21 December 2011. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  92. "The best TV of 2012   Best of   The A.V. Club". Avclub.com. 26 December 2012. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  93. St. James, Emily (20 December 2013). "Enlightened was the best TV show of 2013   Best of   The A.V. Club". Avclub.com. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  94. Adams, Erik (11 December 2014). "The best TV shows of 2014 (part 2)   Best of   The A.V. Club". Avclub.com. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  95. "The best TV of 2015, part 2". Avclub.com. 16 December 2015. Retrieved 16 December 2015.
  96. "The best TV of 2016, part 2". Avclub.com. 14 December 2016. Retrieved 14 December 2016.
  97. "The A.V. Club's 20 best TV shows of 2017". The A.V. Club. 13 December 2017. Retrieved 13 December 2017.
  98. "The best TV of 2018". The A.V. Club. 10 December 2018. Retrieved 10 December 2018.
  99. "The 25 best TV shows of 2019". The A.V. Club. 9 December 2019. Retrieved 18 December 2019.
  100. "The 25 best TV shows of 2020". The A.V. Club. 14 December 2020. Retrieved 14 December 2020.
  101. "The 25 best TV shows of 2021". The A.V. Club. 22 December 2021. Retrieved 22 December 2021.
  102. "The 30 best TV shows of 2022". The A.V. Club. 5 December 2022. Retrieved 27 December 2022.
  103. "The 30 best TV shows of 2023". The A.V. Club. 5 December 2023. Retrieved 20 December 2023.