2000 Cannes Film Festival

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2000 Cannes Film Festival
CFF2000poster.jpg
Official poster of the 53rd Cannes Film Festival featuring an original illustration by Italian artist Lorenzo Mattotti. [1]
Opening film Vatel
Closing film Stardom
Location Cannes, France
Founded1946
Awards Palme d'Or ( Dancer in the Dark ) [2]
Hosted by Virginie Ledoyen
No. of films23 (En Competition) [3]
22 (Un Certain Regard)
11 (Out of Competition)
13 (Cinéfondation)
11 (Short Film)
Festival date14 May 2000 (2000-05-14) – 25 May 2000 (2000-05-25)
Website festival-cannes.com/en

The 53rd Cannes Film Festival started on 14 May and ran until 25 May 2000. French film director, screenwriter, and producer Luc Besson was the Jury President. The Palme d'Or went to the Danish film Dancer in the Dark by Lars von Trier. [4] [5] [6]

Contents

The festival opened with Vatel , directed by Roland Joffé [7] [8] and closed with Stardom , directed by Denys Arcand. [9] [10] Virginie Ledoyen was the mistress of ceremonies. [11]

2000 Un Certain Regard poster featuring a still of Audrey Hepburn in Sabrina by Bud Fraker Un certain regard 00.jpg
2000 Un Certain Regard poster featuring a still of Audrey Hepburn in Sabrina by Bud Fraker

Juries

Luc Besson, Jury President Luc Besson Cannes cropped.jpg
Luc Besson, Jury President
Jane Birkin, Un Certain Regard Jury President Jane Birkin07.JPG
Jane Birkin, Un Certain Regard Jury President

Main competition

The following people were appointed as the Jury for the feature films of the 2000 Official Selection: [13]

Un Certain Regard

The following people were appointed as the Jury of the 2000 Un Certain Regard:

Cinéfondation and short films

The following people were appointed as the Jury of the Cinéfondation and short films competition:

Camera d'Or

The following people were appointed as the Jury of the 2000 Camera d'Or:

Official selection

In competition - Feature film

The following feature films competed for the Palme d'Or: [3]

Un Certain Regard

The following films were selected for the competition of Un Certain Regard: [3]

Films out of competition

The following films were selected to be screened out of competition: [3]

Cinéfondation

The following films were selected for the competition of Cinéfondation: [3]

  • Ascension by Malgoska Szumowska (Poland)
  • Course de nuit by Chuyên Bui Thac (Vietnam)
  • De janela pro cinema by Quia Rodrígues (Brazil)
  • Dessert by (Kinu'ach) Amit Sakomski (Israel)
  • Don't Miss the Killer (Mi sas xefygei o dolofonos) by Anastas Haralampidis (Greece)
  • Five Feet High and Rising by Peter Sollett (United States)
  • Indien by Pernille Fischer Christensen (Denmark)
  • Kiss It Up to God by Caran Hartsfield (United States)
  • Le vent souffle où il veut by Claire Doyon (France)
  • Leben 1, 2, 3 by Michael Schorr (Germany)
  • Nocturnal by Anna Viduleja (Latvia)
  • Breathing Under Water (Respirar (Debaixo d'água)) by António Ferreira (Portugal)
  • Shoot the Dog by Ariko Kimura (Japan)

Short film competition

The following short films competed for the Short Film Palme d'Or: [3]

  • 3 Minutes by Ana Luiza Azevedo
  • Shadows (Anino) by Raymond Red- Short Film Palme d'Or winner
  • Des morceaux de ma femme by Frédéric Pelle
  • Shut the Door (Døren som ikke smakk) by Jens Lien
  • Mieux ou moins bien ? by Jocelyn Cammack
  • S'Arretent by Anthony Mullins

Parallel sections

International Critics' Week

The following films were screened for the 39th International Critics' Week (39e Semaine de la Critique): [14]

Feature film competition

Short film competition

Directors' Fortnight

The following films were screened for the 2000 Directors' Fortnight (Quinzaine des Réalizateurs): [15]

Short films
  • A corps perdu by Isabelle Broué (France)
  • C’est bien la société by Valérie Pavia (France)
  • C'est pas si compliqué by Xavier De Choudens (France)
  • Derailed - extract from Phœnix Tape by Christoph Girardet, Matthias Müller (Germany)
  • Des larmes de sang by Valérie Mréjen (France)
  • Elisabeth by Valérie Mréjen (France)
  • Ferment by Tim Macmillan (Great Britain)
  • Flying Boys by Didier Seynave (Belgium)
  • Furniture Poetry (and Other Rhymes for the Camera) by Paul Bush (Great Britain)
  • Ghost by Steve Hawley (Great Britain)
  • Grüezi Wohl Fraü Stirnimaa… or Malou möter Ingmar Bergman och Erland Josephson by Sonja Wyss (Switzerland - Netherlands)
  • Head Stand by Lisa Robinson (United States)
  • In Absentia by The Brothers Quay (Great Britain)
  • Jocelyne by Valérie Mréjen (France)
  • La Brèche de Roland by Arnaud & Jean-Marie Larrieu
  • La Poire by Valérie Mréjen (France)
  • La Pomme, la Figue et l’Amande by Joël Brisse
  • La Vie heureuse by Valérie Pavia (France)
  • Le mur by Faouzi Bensaïdi (France)
  • Les Oiseaux en cage ne peuvent pas voler by Luis Briceño (France)
  • Look at Me by Peter Stel (Netherlands)
  • Love is All by Oliver Harrison (Great Britain)
  • L'Epouvantail or Pugalo by Alexander Kott (Russia)
  • Collision Course by Roberval Duarte (Brazil)
  • Rue Francis by François Vogel (France)
  • Salam by Souad El-Bouhati (France)
  • Still Life by Pekka Sassi (Finland)
  • The Morphology of Desire by Robert Arnold (United States)

Awards

Lars Von Trier, winner of the Palme d'Or at the event LarsVonTrier.jpg
Lars Von Trier, winner of the Palme d'Or at the event
Jiang Wen, Gran Prix winner 2008-03-14 Jiang Wen.jpg
Jiang Wen, Gran Prix winner

Official awards

The following films and people received the 2000 Official selection awards: [2] [4] [5]

In Competition

Un Certain Regard

Cinéfondation

Golden Camera

Short Films

Independent awards

FIPRESCI Prizes [16]

Commission Supérieure Technique

Ecumenical Jury [17]

Award of the Youth [5]

Awards in the frame of International Critics' Week [18]

Awards in the frame of Directors' Fortnight [18]

Association Prix François Chalais

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References

  1. "Posters 2000". festival-cannes.fr. Archived from the original on 20 October 2013.
  2. 1 2 "Awards 2000: All Awards". festival-cannes.fr. Archived from the original on 18 October 2014.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Official Selection 2000: All the Selection". festival-cannes.fr. Archived from the original on 14 December 2013.
  4. 1 2 "53ème Festival International du Film - Cannes". cinema-francais.fr (in French). Retrieved 13 June 2017.
  5. 1 2 3 "Cannes 2000 Palmares". cannes-fest.com (in French). Retrieved 13 June 2017.
  6. "Dancer's surprise win at Cannes". BBC News. 21 May 2000. Retrieved 25 May 2017.
  7. "Review Vatel ees a disastaire". theguardian.com. Retrieved 25 May 2017.
  8. "Joffe's Vatel to open Cannes". screendaily.com. Retrieved 25 May 2017. needs subscription
  9. "Cannes 2000 Competition & Special Screenings". iofilm.co.uk. Archived from the original on 2016-03-05. Retrieved 25 May 2017.
  10. "Lions Gate seals US deal on Cannes closer Stardom". screendaily.com. Retrieved 25 May 2017. needs subscription
  11. "Film world flocks to Cannes". BBC News. 10 May 2000. Retrieved 25 May 2017.
  12. "Posters 2000". festival-cannes.fr. Archived from the original on 3 March 2016.
  13. "All Juries 2000". festival-cannes.fr. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016.
  14. "39e Selecion de la Semaine de la Critique - 2000". archives.semainedelacritique.com. Retrieved 13 June 2017.
  15. "Quinzaine 2000". quinzaine-realisateurs.com. Retrieved 13 June 2017.
  16. "FIPRESCI Awards 2000". fipresci.org. Retrieved 22 June 2017.
  17. "JuryŒcuménique Palmarés 2000". cannes.juryoecumenique.org. Retrieved 23 June 2017.
  18. 1 2 "Cannes Film Festival Awards for 2000". imdb.com. Retrieved 23 June 2017.
  19. "Cannes 2000 François Chalais". francois-chalais.fr. Retrieved 23 June 2017.[ permanent dead link ]

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