1999 Cannes Film Festival

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1999 Cannes Film Festival
CFF99poster.jpg
Official poster of the 52nd Cannes Film Festival featuring an original illustration by Jean-Pierre Gendis. [1]
Opening film The Barber of Siberia
Closing film An Ideal Husband
Location Cannes, France
Founded1946
Awards Palme d'Or ( Rosetta ) [2]
Hosted by Kristin Scott Thomas
No. of films22 (En Competition) [3]
23 (Un Certain Regard)
8 (Out of Competition)
20 (Cinéfondation)
12 (Short Film)
Festival date12 May 1999 (1999-05-12) – 23 May 1999 (1999-05-23)
Website festival-cannes.com/en

The 52nd Cannes Film Festival was held from 12 to 23 May 1999. [4] Canadian filmmaker, actor and author David Cronenberg was the Jury President. The Palme d'Or went to the FrenchBelgian film Rosetta by Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne. [5] [6]

Contents

The festival opened with The Barber of Siberia , directed by Nikita Mikhalkov and closed with An Ideal Husband , directed by Oliver Parker. [7] [8] Kristin Scott Thomas was the mistress of ceremonies. [9]

199 Un Certain Regard poster, adapted from an original illustration by Assane N' Doye. Un certain regard 99.jpg
199 Un Certain Regard poster, adapted from an original illustration by Assane N' Doye.

Juries

David Cronenberg, Jury President David Cronenberg(CannesPhotoCall)-.jpg
David Cronenberg, Jury President
Lambert Wilson, Un Certain Regard Jury President Lambert Wilson Cannes.jpg
Lambert Wilson, Un Certain Regard Jury President

Main competition

The following people were appointed as the Jury for the feature films of the 1999 Official Selection: [11]

Un Certain Regard

The following people were appointed as the Jury of the 1999 Un Certain Regard:

Cinéfondation and short films

The following people were appointed as the Jury of the Cinéfondation and short films competition:

Camera d'Or

The following people were appointed as the Jury of the 1999 Camera d'Or:

Official selection

In competition – Feature film

The following feature films competed for the Palme d'Or: [3]

Un Certain Regard

The following films were selected for the competition of Un Certain Regard: [3]

Films out of competition

The following films were selected to be screened out of competition: [3]

Cinéfondation

The following films were selected for the competition of Cinéfondation: [3]

  • Baballoon (Babalon) by Michal Zabka
  • Cambi e Scambi by Donata Pizzato
  • The Clock by Noah Laracy
  • Dimanche by Fabrice Aragno
  • The Execution by Lee In-Kyun
  • Fish 073 (Ryba 073) by Vaclav Svankmajer
  • Germania by Kris Krikellis
  • Im Hukim (With Rules) by Dover Kosashvili
  • Inter-View by Jessica Hausner
  • Ked Nie, Tak Nie by Vladimir Kral
  • Layover by Shen Ko-Shang
  • Der Linkshander by Iouri Kouzine
  • Little Big Dog (En God Dag At Go) by Bo Hagen Clausen
  • Milk by Mairi Cameron
  • La Puce by Emmanuelle Bercot
  • Runt by Jesse Lawrence
  • Second Hand by Emily Young
  • Waxandwane by Axel Koenzen
  • Wojtek by David Turner
  • Yumeji Ningyo (Doll of Dreams) by Yamazaki Tatsuji

Short film competition

The following short films competed for the Short Film Palme d'Or: [3]

Parallel sections

International Critics' Week

The following films were screened for the 38th International Critics' Week (38e Semaine de la Critique): [13]

Feature film competition

Short film competition

Directors' Fortnight

The following films were screened for the 1999 Directors' Fortnight (Quinzaine des Réalizateurs): [14]

Short films

Awards

Luc Dardenne (left) and Jean-Pierre Dardenne, Palme d'Or winners Dardenne 2014.jpg
Luc Dardenne (left) and Jean-Pierre Dardenne, Palme d'Or winners
Bruno Dumont, Gran Prix winner Bruno Dumont (cropped).jpg
Bruno Dumont, Gran Prix winner

Official awards

The following films and people received the 1999 Official selection awards: [2] [5]

In Competition

Un Certain Regard

Cinéfondation

Golden Camera

Short Films

Independent awards

FIPRESCI Prizes [15]

Commission Supérieure Technique

Ecumenical Jury [16]

Award of the Youth [17]

Awards in the frame of International Critics' Week [17]

Awards in the frame of Directors' Fortnight [17]

Association Prix François Chalais

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References

  1. "Posters 1999". festival-cannes.fr. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016.
  2. 1 2 "Awards 1999: All Awards". festival-cannes.fr. Archived from the original on 6 February 2015.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Official Selection 1999: All the Selection". festival-cannes.fr. Archived from the original on 14 October 2013.
  4. "Cannes 1999: Official Selection". urbancinefile.com. Retrieved 25 May 2017.
  5. 1 2 "52ème Festival International du Film – Cannes". cinema-francais.fr (in French). Retrieved 13 June 2017.
  6. "Cannes 1999 Avant-Programme". cannes-fest.com (in French). Retrieved 13 June 2017.
  7. "Cannes Film Festival 1999: the line-up". theguardian.com. Retrieved 25 May 2017.
  8. "Cannes '99: Competition Film Lineup". indiewire.com. Retrieved 25 May 2017.
  9. Wilmington, Michael (30 May 1999). "Cannes Of Vinegar". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 25 May 2017.
  10. "Posters 1999". festival-cannes.fr. Archived from the original on 10 February 2017.
  11. "All Juries 1999". festival-cannes.fr. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016.
  12. "Special screenings". festival-cannes.com. Retrieved 27 July 2017.
  13. "38e Selecion de la Semaine de la Critique - 1999". archives.semainedelacritique.com. Retrieved 13 June 2017.
  14. "Quinzaine 1999". quinzaine-realisateurs.com. Retrieved 13 June 2017.
  15. "FIPRESCI Awards 1999". fipresci.org. Retrieved 22 June 2017.
  16. "Jury Œcuménique 1999". cannes.juryoecumenique.org. Retrieved 22 June 2017.
  17. 1 2 3 "Cannes Film Festival Awards 1999". imdb.com. Retrieved 24 June 2017.

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