1992 Cannes Film Festival

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1992 Cannes Film Festival
CFF92poster.jpg
Official poster of the 45th Cannes Film Festival, featuring a portrait of German actress Marlene Dietrich by Don English. [1]
Opening film Basic Instinct
Closing film Far and Away
Location Cannes, France
Founded1946
Awards Palme d'Or ( Den goda viljan ) [2]
No. of films21 (En Competition) [3]
20 (Un Certain Regard)
15 (Out of Competition)
12 (Short Film)
Festival date7 May 1992 (1992-05-07) – 18 May 1992 (1992-05-18)
Website festival-cannes.com/en

The 45th Cannes Film Festival was held from 7 to 18 May 1992. The Palme d'Or went to the Den goda viljan by Bille August. [4] [5] [6]

Contents

The festival opened with Basic Instinct , directed by Paul Verhoeven [7] and closed with Far and Away , directed by Ron Howard. [8] [9]

Juries

Gerard Depardieu, Jury President Gerard Depardieu 2001.jpg
Gérard Depardieu, Jury President

Main competition

The following people were appointed as the Jury of the 1992 feature film competition: [10]

Camera d'Or

The following people were appointed as the Jury of the 1992 Camera d'Or:

Official selection

In competition - Feature film

The following feature films competed for the Palme d'Or: [3]

Un Certain Regard

The following films were selected for the competition of Un Certain Regard: [3]

Films out of competition

The following films were selected to be screened out of competition: [3]

Short film competition

The following short films competed for the Short Film Palme d'Or: [3]

Parallel sections

International Critics' Week

The following films were screened for the 31st International Critics' Week (31e Semaine de la Critique): [11]

Feature film competition

Short film competition

  • Floating by Richard Heslop (United Kingdom)
  • Home Stories by Matthias Müller (Germany)
  • Les Marionnettes by Marc Chevrie (France)
  • Le Petit chat est mort by Fejria Deliba (France)
  • Revolver by Chester Dent (United Kingdom)
  • The Room by Jeff Balsmeyer (United States)
  • Sprickan by Kristian Petri (Sweden)

Directors' Fortnight

The following films were screened for the 1992 Directors' Fortnight (Quinzaine des Réalizateurs): [12]

Short films
  • L’autre Célia by Irène Jouannet
  • F.X. Messerschmidt sculpteur (1736-1783) by Marino Vagliano
  • Juliette by Didier Bivel
  • Le Trou de la corneille by François Hanss
  • Léa by Christophe Debuisne
  • Pilotes by Olivier Zagar
  • Versailles Rive Gauche by Bruno Podalydès
  • Voleur d’images by Bruno Victor-Pujebet

Awards

Bille August, Palme d'Or winner Bille August.jpg
Bille August, Palme d'Or winner
Cast and crew of Basic Instinct, opening film of the 1992 Cannes Film Festival Basic Instinct Cannes 1992.jpg
Cast and crew of Basic Instinct , opening film of the 1992 Cannes Film Festival

Official awards

The following films and people received the 1992 Official selection awards: [2]

Golden Camera

Short films

Independent awards

FIPRESCI Prize [13]

Commission Supérieure Technique

Ecumenical Jury [14]

Award of the Youth [15]

Awards in the frame of International Critics' Week [15]

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References

  1. "Posters 1992". festival-cannes.fr. Archived from the original on 14 December 2013.
  2. 1 2 "Awards 1992: All Awards". festival-cannes.fr. Archived from the original on 21 February 2015.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 "Official Selection 1992: All the Selection". festival-cannes.fr. Archived from the original on 14 December 2013.
  4. "45ème Festival International du Film - Cannes". cinema-francais.fr (in French). Retrieved 7 June 2017.
  5. "1992 - Les joueurs (The players)". cannes-fest.com (in French). Retrieved 7 June 2017.
  6. "Cannes Film Festival 1992". nicksflickpicks.com. Retrieved 25 May 2017.
  7. "Film View- On the Beach at Cannes With the American Force". nytimes.com. Retrieved 25 May 2017.
  8. "August Film Tops Cannes". chicagotribune.com. Retrieved 25 May 2017.
  9. "U.S. films will dominate Cannes film festival". baltimoresun.com. Retrieved 25 May 2017.
  10. "All Juries 1992". festival-cannes.fr. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016.
  11. "31e Selecion de la Semaine de la Critique - 1992". archives.semainedelacritique.com. Retrieved 9 June 2017.
  12. "Quinzaine 1992". quinzaine-realisateurs.com. Retrieved 9 June 2017.
  13. "FIPRESCI Awards 1992". fipresci.org. Retrieved 27 June 2017.
  14. "Jury Œcuménique 1992". cannes.juryoecumenique.org. Retrieved 27 June 2017.
  15. 1 2 3 "Cannes Film Festival Awards for 1992". imdb.com. Retrieved 27 June 2017.

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