1951 Cannes Film Festival

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4th Cannes Film Festival
CFF51poster.jpg
Official poster of the 4th Cannes Film Festival illustrated by A.M. Rodicq. [1]
Location Cannes, France
Founded1946
Awards Grand Prize of the Festival
( Miss Julie &
Miracle in Milan ) [2]
No. of films36 (In Competition) [3]
39 (Short Film)
Festival dateApril 3 – 20, 1951
Website www.festival-cannes.com
Cannes Film Festival

The 4th Cannes Film Festival was held from 3 to 20 April 1951. The previous year, no festival had been held because of financial reasons. In 1951, the festival took place in April instead of September to avoid direct competition with the Venice Film Festival. [4]

Contents

As in the previous two festivals, the entire jury was made up of French persons. The Grand Prix of the Festival went to two different films, Miss Julie by Alf Sjöberg and Miracle in Milan by Vittorio De Sica. [5]

The festival honoured Michèle Morgan, Jean Marais and Jean Cocteau with the Victoire du cinéma français award. [6] [7]

Jury

Andre Maurois, Jury President AndreMaurois.JPG
Andre Maurois, Jury President

The following people were appointed as the Jury for the feature and short films. [8]

Substitute members

Short films

Feature film competition

The following feature films competed for the Grand Prix: [3]

Short films

The following short films competed for the Grand Prix du court métrage: [3]

Awards

Alf Sjoberg, Grand Prix winner Alf Sjoberg.jpg
Alf Sjöberg, Grand Prix winner
Vittorio De Sica, Grand Prix winner S Kragujevic, Vittorio De Sica, 1959.JPG
Vittorio De Sica, Grand Prix winner
Bert Haanstra, Grand Prix winner Bert Haanstra.jpg
Bert Haanstra, Grand Prix winner

The following films and people received the 1951 awards: [2] [9] [5] Feature Films

Short Films

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References

  1. "Posters 1951". festival-cannes.fr. Archived from the original on 26 December 2013.
  2. 1 2 "Awards 1951: All Awards". festival-cannes.fr. Archived from the original on 26 December 2013.
  3. 1 2 3 "Official Selection 1951". festival-cannes.fr. Archived from the original on 26 December 2013.
  4. "Cannes Film Festival". ukhotmovies.com. Archived from the original on 3 July 2017. Retrieved 25 May 2017.
  5. 1 2 "4ème Festival International du Film - Cannes". cinema-francais.fr (in French). Retrieved 5 June 2017.
  6. "Awarding of the "Victoire du cinéma français" awards at the opening of the 1951 Festival". fresques.ina.fr. Retrieved 25 May 2017.
  7. "1951 - Miracle à Cannes (Miracle in Cannes)". cannes-fest.com (in French). Retrieved 27 June 2017.
  8. "Juries 1951: All the Juries". festival-cannes.fr. Archived from the original on 10 June 2015.
  9. "1951 - Le Jury, Les Prix". cannes-fest.com (in French). Retrieved 8 July 2017.

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