Breakaway (ice hockey)

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Breakaway during a game between the Guildford Flames and the Milton Keynes Lightning Guildford Flames At Milton Keynes Lightning.jpg
Breakaway during a game between the Guildford Flames and the Milton Keynes Lightning

A breakaway is a situation in ice hockey in which a player with the puck has no defending players, except for the goaltender, between himself and the opposing goal, leaving him free to skate in and shoot at will (before the out-of-position defenders can catch him). A breakaway is considered a lapse on the part of the defending team. If a player's progress is illegally impeded by an opposing player or if the goalie throws his stick at the oncoming player, the breakaway player is awarded a penalty shot. If a player faces an empty net (i.e. the opposing team has pulled their goalie) and is illegally impeded by an opposing player, he is automatically awarded a goal for his team instead of taking a penalty shot.

Contents

Defense against a breakaway

See also

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Delay of game is a penalty in ice hockey. It results in the offending player spending two minutes in the penalty box. In the NHL, delay of game is usually called under eight circumstances:

  1. A player or goaltender intentionally shoots or throws the puck out of the playing area.
  2. A defensive player in the defensive zone shoots the puck directly over the glass. This penalty only applies if the player shoots it over the glass. If the puck is shot into the bench, no penalty is assessed.
  3. A player or goaltender intentionally knocks the net's goalpost off its moorings, which stops the play. If the net is intentionally knocked loose during a breakaway, the breakaway player is awarded a penalty shot. If there is not enough time in the game to serve the full delay of game penalty, the last player to take a shot is also awarded a penalty shot.
  4. The player or goalie intentionally keeps the puck behind the net for more than a minute
  5. The goaltender freezes the puck rather than passing it on to a teammate when no player on the opposing team is within sufficient distance to apply offensive pressure to him.
  6. Any skater other than the goaltender uses their hands to make the puck unplayable.
  7. Fans begin to throw objects onto the ice or disrupt the game.
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The NHL All-Star Game SuperSkills Competition, originally known as the National Hockey League All-Star Skills Competition, is an event on the night preceding the All-Star Game. Started at the 41st National Hockey League All-Star Game in Pittsburgh in 1990, the NHL uses the event to showcase the talents of its all-star participants. Events include accuracy shooting, fastest skater, Skills Challenge Relay, hardest shot, Breakaway Challenge, and an Elimination Shootout. The All-Star teams select representatives for each event, with points awarded to the winning team.

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