Brian Juliff

Last updated

Brian Juliff
Personal information
Full nameBrian James Juliff
Born (1952-12-05) 5 December 1952 (age 68)
Mountain Ash, Wales
Playing information
Height6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Rugby union
Position Wing, Centre
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1970–71 Mountain Ash RFC 32200080
1971–78 Pontypridd RFC 101303
1976 Newport RFC 14
Total3212200387
Rugby league
Position Wing, Second-row, Loose forward
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1978 Widnes 11003
1978–82 Wakefield Trinity 1204900147
1982–85 Wigan 51+18120038
1985–88 Halifax 41+28120048
1988 Castleford 8+330012
Total2707700248
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1979–84 Wales 81003
Coaching information
Club
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
1991 Rochdale Hornets 10010
Source: [1] [2] [3]

Brian "Mad Dog" Juliff (born 5 December 1952 [4] ) is a Welsh former rugby union and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1970s and 1980s. He played representative level rugby union (RU) for Wales 'B', Wales President's XV, East Wales, Glamorgan County RFC, at invitational level for Crawshays RFC, and at club level Mountain Ash RFC, Newport RFC and Pontypridd RFC, as a Left-Wing, or Outside-Centre, i.e. number 11, or 13, [2] and representative rugby league (RL) for Wales, and at club level for Widnes (as A. N. Other), Wakefield Trinity (Heritage № 855), Wigan (Heritage № 788), Halifax and Castleford (Heritage № 665), as a wing , second-row , loose forward, i.e. number 2 or 5, 11 or 12, or 13, during the era of contested scrums. [3] [5] In June 2012 Juliff was appointed as the chairman of Wales Rugby League.

Contents

Background

Brian Juliff was born in Mountain Ash, Wales.

Playing career

Representative rugby union

Brian Juliff played representative rugby union for Wales 'B', Wales President's XV, East Wales against Argentina scoring 1-try, and against Japan scoring 3-tries, Glamorgan County RFC and Crawshays RFC.

International honours

Brian Juliff won caps for Wales (RL) while at Wakefield Trinity in 1979 against France, and England, in 1980 against France, and England, in 1981 against France, and England, and while at Wigan in 1982 against Australia, and in 1984 against England (playing for 30 minutes with a broken arm). [3]

Championship appearances

Brian Juliff was signed by Halifax from Wigan for £6,000 in September 1985 (based on increases in average earnings, this would be approximately £24,720 in 2014), [6] he played in Halifax's victory in the Championship during the 1985–86 season, finishing one point ahead of Wigan. He played in 23-games in all competitions that season, scoring 4-tries.

Challenge Cup Final appearances

Brian Juliff played left wing, i.e. number 5, in Wakefield Trinity's 3-12 defeat by Widnes in the 1978–79 Challenge Cup Final during the 1978–79 season at Wembley Stadium, London, on Saturday 5 May 1979, in front of a crowd of a crowd of 94,218, [7] played as a second-half interchange/substitute in Wigan's 6-19 defeat by Widnes in the 1983–84 Challenge Cup Final during the 1983–84 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 5 May 1984, and played as a second-half interchange/substitute (replacing Stand-off Chris Anderson) in Halifax's 19-18 victory over St. Helens in the 1986–87 Challenge Cup Final during the 1986–87 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 2 May 1987.

Juliff was the second player ever (and only Welshman) to represent 3 different teams (Wakefield Trinity, Wigan and Halifax) in the Challenge Cup Final at Wembley. After breaking an arm playing for Wales in 1984, Brian returned to play in the Challenge Cup semi-final for Wigan against Hull Kingston Rovers, scoring a crucial try from the Right-Wing.

John Player Trophy Final appearances

Brian Juliff played as an interchange/substitute (replacing Henderson Gill on 61-minutes) and scored a try on 75-minutes in Wigan's 15-4 victory over Leeds in the 1982 John Player Trophy Final during the 1982–83 season at Elland Road, Leeds on Saturday 22 January 1983. [8]

Club career

Brian Juliff was signed by Wigan from Wakefield Trinity for £25,000 in 1982 (based on increases in average earnings, this would be approximately £110,200 in 2013). [6]

Coaching

Brian was acting head coach in the 42-0 away defeat to Castleford in Jan 1991, stepping up from assistant coach to Allan Agar.

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References

  1. RL Record Keepers' Club
  2. 1 2 "Statistics at en.espn.co.uk (RU)". espn.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  3. 1 2 3 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org (RL)". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2013. Retrieved 1 January 2014.
  4. "Birth details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2013. Retrieved 1 January 2014.
  5. Williams, Graham; Lush, Peter; Farrar, David (2009). The British Rugby League Records Book. London League. pp. 108–114. ISBN   978-1-903659-49-6.
  6. 1 2 "Measuring Worth – Relative Value of UK Pounds". Measuring Worth. 31 December 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2015.
  7. Hoole, Les (2004). Wakefield Trinity RLFC - FIFTY GREAT GAMES. Breedon Books. ISBN   1-85983-429-9
  8. "22nd January 1983: Leeds 4 Wigan 15 (John Player Trophy Final)". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2013. Retrieved 1 January 2014.
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Allan Agar
1989–1991
Coach
Rochdale colours.svg
Rochdale Hornets

1991
Succeeded by
Neil Holding
1991