Cape Simpson

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Cape Simpson ( 67°28′S61°8′E / 67.467°S 61.133°E / -67.467; 61.133 Coordinates: 67°28′S61°8′E / 67.467°S 61.133°E / -67.467; 61.133 ) is a high rocky bluff at the north end of Ufs Island, forming the east side of the entrance to Howard Bay. Discovered in February 1931 by the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE) under Mawson. He named it for A. A. Simpson of the Royal Geographical Society of Australasia, who helped finance Mawson's Antarctic expeditions. [1]

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Ufs Island is a rocky island 3.2 km (2 mi) wide, lying in the east part of Howard Bay, Antarctica, just north of the Lachal Bluffs, and about 4 km (2.5 mi) west of Allison Bay. Cape Simpson, the north end of this island, was discovered by the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE) under Mawson in February 1931, but the feature's insularity was first recognized by Norwegian cartographers working from aerial photographs taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition, 1936-37. They named it Ufsoy.

On 22 June 1883, the Geographical Society of Australasia started at a meeting in Sydney. A branch was formed in Victoria in the same year. In July 1885, both the Queensland and the South Australian branches started.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Cape Simpson" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

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Geographic Names Information System geographical database

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Salmon Bay is a bay about 12 miles (19 km) wide at the entrance between Cape Cesney and Lewis Island in Antarctica. It was discovered from the Aurora by the Australasian Antarctic Expedition (1910–14) under Douglas Mawson, and named Davis Bay by Mawson for Captain John King Davis, master of the Aurora and second-in-command of the expedition.

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Stefansson Bay is a bay indenting the coast for 16 kilometres (10 mi) between Law Promontory and Fold Island. Mawson of the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE) applied the name to a sweep of the coast west of Cape Wilkins which he observed on about February 18, 1931. Exploration by DI personnel on the William Scoresby, 1936, and the Lars Christensen expedition 1936-37, defined this section of the coast more accurately. It was named for Vilhjalmur Stefansson, Arctic explorer.

Scott Mountains (Antarctica) mountain range in Antarctica

The Scott Mountains are a large number of isolated peaks lying south of Amundsen Bay in Enderby Land of East Antarctica, Antarctica. Discovered on 13 January 1930 by the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE) under Sir Douglas Mawson. He named the feature Scott Range after Captain Robert Falcon Scott, Royal Navy. The term mountains is considered more appropriate because of the isolation of its individual features.

Howard Bay is a 2-mile (3 km) wide body of water in Antarctica, lying between Byrd Head to the west and Ufs Island and the Lachal Bluffs to the east. It was discovered in February 1931 by the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition under Douglas Mawson, and was named by him after A. Howard, the expedition's hydrologist.

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Chapman Ridge is a ridge rising to 300 metres (1,000 ft) and extending southwest for 3 nautical miles (6 km) from Byrd Head. It was discovered by the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition, 1929–31, under Douglas Mawson, and mapped by Norwegian cartographers from aerial photographs taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition, 1936–37. It was named by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia for the then-Australian scientist, Philip K. Chapman, auroral physicist at Mawson Station, during the International Geophysical Year,1958. Chapman and Henry Fischer, a Swiss national, were members of the Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition (ANARE). They were the first humans to climb the ridge which they did several times. They did not take geological samples, make claims nor leave any marker.

Stevenson Island is a small island 120 m high, lying at the east side of Colbeck Archipelago, 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) northeast of Cape Simpson. Discovered in February 1931 by the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (BANZARE) under Mawson. He named it for Captain J.B. Stevenson, Royal Navy, a member of the Australian Aurora Committee, 1916-17.

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Tschuffert Peak is a prominent, isolated peak between Taylor Glacier and Chapman Ridge in Mac. Robertson Land. It was mapped by Norwegian cartographers from air photos taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition in 1936–37, and was originally named Svartpiggen. The peak was later renamed 'Tschuffert Peak' by the Antarctic Names Committee of Australia (ANCA) after H. Tschuffert, who served as meteorologist at Mawson Station in 1958.

Cape Dovers is a cape fronting on the Shackleton Ice Shelf, 5 nautical miles (9 km) south of Henderson Island. It was discovered by the Western Base party of the Australasian Antarctic Expedition, 1911–14, under Mawson, and named for G. Dovers, cartographer with the expedition.

Smith Peaks is a group of peaks standing close south of Mount Hordern in the David Range of the Framnes Mountains. Mapped by Norwegian cartographers from aerial photographs taken by the Lars Christensen Expedition, 1936-37. Remapped by ANARE, 1957–60, and named by Antarctic Names Committee of Australia (ANCA) for F.A. Smith, diesel mechanic at Mawson Station, 1957.

Mill Peak is a prominent peak, 1,760 metres (5,770 ft) high, rising above the Antarctic ice sheet 10 nautical miles (19 km) south of Pearce Peak and 30 nautical miles (56 km) south of Cape Simpson. it was discovered in February 1931 by the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition under Douglas Mawson, who named it for Dr. Hugh Robert Mill.

Hayes Peak is a conical peak in Antarctica, that reaches 340 metres (1,120 ft) high, rising through the ice slopes 2 nautical miles (4 km) south of Cape Bruce and Oom Bay. It was discovered in February 1931 by the British Australian New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition under Douglas Mawson, who named it after Reverend James Gordon Hayes.

Cape Hoadley is a prominent rock coastal outcrop forming the west portal of the valley occupied by Scott Glacier in East Antarctica. It was discovered by the Western Base Party of the Australasian Antarctic Expedition under Mawson in November 1912, and named by him for C.A. Hoadley, a geologist with the party.

Mount Cook is a mountain, 1,900 m, the highest point of the main massif of the Leckie Range in Antarctica. Approximately mapped by Norwegian cartographers on Norwegian whalers chart No. 3. Plotted from air photos taken by ANARE in 1956, and first visited by G.A. Knuckey of ANARE in December 1956, when its position was fixed. Named by Antarctic Names Committee of Australia (ANCA) for B.G. Cook, geophysicist at Mawson station in 1958.

References

  1. Today Not Tomorrow: A Century of Progress pub. A. Simpson & Son Ltd. Adelaide 1954