Collected Stories of William Faulkner

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First edition Collected Stories of William Faulkner.jpg
First edition

Collected Stories of William Faulkner is a short story collection by William Faulkner published by Random House in 1950. It won the National Book Award for Fiction in 1951. [1] The publication of this collection of 42 stories was authorized and supervised by Faulkner himself, who came up with the themed section headings. [2]

Contents

I. THE COUNTRY
II. THE VILLAGE
III. THE WILDERNESS
IV. THE WASTELAND
V. THE MIDDLE GROUND
VI. BEYOND

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References

  1. "1951 - www.nbafictionblog.org - National Book Awards Fiction Winners". nbafictionblog.org.
  2. "WFotW ~ Collected Stories of William Faulkner (Short Story Collections)". olemiss.edu. Archived from the original on 2014-12-19. Retrieved 2014-12-05.
Awards
Preceded by
The Man with the Golden Arm
Nelson Algren
National Book Award for Fiction
1951
Succeeded by
From Here To Eternity
James Jones