Submarine Patrol

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Submarine Patrol
Submarine Patrol 1938 poster.jpg
1938 Theatrical Poster
Directed by John Ford
Written by William Faulkner
Jack Yellen
Produced by Darryl F. Zanuck
Starring Richard Greene
Nancy Kelly
Preston Foster
George Bancroft
Cinematography Arthur C. Miller
Edited by Robert L. Simpson
Distributed by 20th Century Fox
Release date
  • November 25, 1938 (1938-11-25)
Running time
95 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

Submarine Patrol is a 1938 film directed by John Ford and starring Richard Greene and Nancy Kelly. The supporting cast includes Preston Foster, George Bancroft, Elisha Cook, Jr., John Carradine, Maxie Rosenbloom, Jack Pennick, Ward Bond and an unbilled Lon Chaney Jr. as a Marine sentry. The movie was partly written by William Faulkner.

Cast


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