My Man (1928 film)

Last updated

My Man
My Man lobby card 3.jpg
Lobby card
Directed by Archie Mayo
Produced by Edward Small [1]
Written by Robert Lord (scenario)
Joseph Jackson (dialogue & titles)
James A. Starr (titles)
Story byMark Canfield (Darryl F. Zanuck)
Starring Fanny Brice
Cinematography Frank Kesson
Edited by Owen Marks
Production
company
Distributed byWarner Bros.
Release date
December 15, 1928 (U.S.) [2]
Running time
99 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish (intertitles and talking sequences)
Budget$192,000 [3]
Box office$1,218,000 [3]

My Man is a 1928 black and white part-talkie American comedy-drama musical film directed by Archie Mayo starring Fanny Brice and featuring Guinn "Big Boy" Williams. It was Brice's feature film debut at the age of 37. She was a star in the Ziegfeld Follies before she started acting in motion pictures. At the time Warner Bros. made this film there were still some silent movies in production and being released. My Man used intertitles but included talking sequences, synchronized music, and sound effects using a Vitaphone sound-on-disc system. [4] It was not be until 1929 that talking movies would completely take over, but Warner Bros. had completely stopped making silent movies and switched to sound pictures by the end of that year, either part talking or full talking. Warner Bros. also started making movies in color as well as sound movies. [5]

Contents

Plot

Fannie Brand (Fanny Brice), an industrious girl who supports her brother and sister by working in a theatrical costume house, falls in love with Joe Halsey (Guinn "Big Boy" Williams), a young fellow who earns a precarious living demonstrating an elastic exerciser in a drugstore window. Fannie and Joe set a date to be married, but the wedding is called off when Fannie finds Joe making love[ clarification needed ] to her unprincipled sister, Edna (Edna Murphy). Fannie auditions for Landau (Andrés De Segurola), a theatrical producer, and goes on the Broadway stage. Fannie is a great success, and she and Joe soon find their way back into each other's arms.

Cast

Reception

According to Warner Bros. records, the film earned $1,099,000 in the U.S. and $119,000 elsewhere. [3]

Songs

All songs sung by Fanny Brice.

Premiere Vitaphone short subjects

My Man premiered at the Warners' Theatre in Manhattan on December 21, 1928.

TitleYear
Val Harris and Ann Howe in "The Wild Westerner"1928
Irene Franklin, the American Comedienne, with Jerry Jarnagin (piano)1928
Ann Codee and Frank Orth in "Zwei and Furtzich"1928

Film preservation

An incomplete version of this film reportedly survives. [4] In addition to this incomplete copy, the full synchronized soundtrack (except the final reel) survives on Vitaphone discs, as well as the soundtrack for the theatrical trailer.

See also

Related Research Articles

<i>The Jazz Singer</i> 1927 film by Alan Crosland

The Jazz Singer is a 1927 American musical drama film directed by Alan Crosland. It is the first feature-length motion picture with not only a synchronized recorded music score but also lip-synchronous singing and speech in several isolated sequences. Its release heralded the commercial ascendance of sound films and ended the silent film era. It was produced by Warner Bros. with its Vitaphone sound-on-disc system. The film features six songs performed by Al Jolson. It is based on the 1925 play of the same name by Samson Raphaelson, which itself was adapted from one of his short stories titled "The Day of Atonement".

<i>The Singing Fool</i> 1928 film by Lloyd Bacon

The Singing Fool is a 1928 American musical drama Part-Talkie motion picture directed by Lloyd Bacon which was released by Warner Bros. The film stars Al Jolson in blackface and is a follow-up to his previous film, The Jazz Singer. It is credited with helping to cement the popularity of American films of both sound and the musical genre.

<i>Glorious Betsy</i> 1928 film

Glorious Betsy is a 1928 silent film with talking sequences. It is based on the 1908 play of the same name by Rida Johnson Young, and it stars Dolores Costello. It was produced by Warner Bros. and nominated for an Academy Award for Best Writing, Adaptation in 1929. The film was directed by Alan Crosland with cinematography by Hal Mohr. A mute print of this film survives in the Library of Congress, and while the copy is missing some of the sound reels, it's unknown whether other copies of the sound have been preserved elsewhere. Vitaphone track survive incomplete at UCLA Film and Television Archive.

<i>Don Juan</i> (1926 film) 1926 film by Alan Crosland

Don Juan is a 1926 American romantic adventure film directed by Alan Crosland. It is the first feature-length film to utilize the Vitaphone sound-on-disc sound system with a synchronized musical score and sound effects, though it has no spoken dialogue. The film is inspired by Lord Byron's 1821 epic poem of the same name. The screenplay was written by Bess Meredyth with intertitles by Maude Fulton and Walter Anthony.

<i>Noahs Ark</i> (1928 film) 1928 film

Noah's Ark is a 1928 American epic romantic melodramatic disaster film directed by Michael Curtiz and starring Dolores Costello and George O'Brien. The story is by Darryl F. Zanuck. The film was released by the Warner Bros. studio. It is representative of the transition from silent movies to "talkies", although it is essentially a hybrid film known as a part-talkie, which used the new Vitaphone sound-on-disc system. Most scenes are silent with a synchronized music score and sound effects, in particular the biblical ones, while some scenes have dialogue.

<i>Paris</i> (1929 film) 1929 film by Clarence G. Badger

Paris is a 1929 American Pre-Code musical comedy film, featuring Irène Bordoni. It was filmed with Technicolor sequences: four of the film's ten reels were originally photographed in Technicolor.

<i>General Crack</i> 1930 film by Alan Crosland

General Crack is a 1929 American pre-Code part-talkie historical costume melodrama with Technicolor sequences which was directed by Alan Crosland and produced and distributed by Warner Bros. It was filmed and premiered in 1929, and released early in 1930. It stars John Barrymore in his first full-length all-talking feature. The film would prove to be Crosland and Barrymore's last historical epic together.

<i>While London Sleeps</i> 1926 film by Howard Bretherton

While London Sleeps is a 1926 Warner Bros. film about a police-dog, Rinty, who helps Scotland Yard defeat a dangerous criminal organisation known as the Mediterranean Brotherhood that operates out of the Limehouse district of London. Walter Morosco wrote the screenplay. It was the first of many films directed by Howard Bretherton, and one of several created for Rin Tin Tin, a German Shepherd dog used in films during the 1920s and 1930s. The film was also released with a Vitaphone sound-on-disc soundtrack with a music score and sound effects, and only the sound discs survive today. The British release prints censored the more horrific aspects of the film.

<i>Tenderloin</i> (film) 1928 film by Michael Curtiz

Tenderloin is a 1928 American part-talkie crime film directed by Michael Curtiz and starring Dolores Costello. While the film was a part-talkie, it was mostly a silent film with a synchronized musical score and sound effects on Vitaphone discs. It was produced and released by Warner Bros. Tenderloin is considered a lost film, with no prints currently known to exist.

<i>Hardboiled Rose</i> 1929 film

Hardboiled Rose is a 1929 American part-talkie romantic drama film directed by F. Harmon Weight and released by Warner Bros. It starred Myrna Loy, William Collier, Jr., and John Miljan.

<i>Women They Talk About</i> 1928 film by Lloyd Bacon

Women They Talk About is a 1928 American comedy drama film directed by Lloyd Bacon and starring Irene Rich and Audrey Ferris. It was a part-talkie Vitaphone film with talking, music, and sound effects sequences and produced and distributed by Warner Bros. It is considered to be a lost film.

<i>Old San Francisco</i> 1927 film by Alan Crosland

Old San Francisco is a 1927 American silent historical drama film starring Dolores Costello and featuring Warner Oland. The film, which was produced and distributed by Warner Bros., was directed by Alan Crosland.

<i>Why Be Good?</i> 1929 film by William A. Seiter

Why Be Good? is a 1929 American silent comedy film from First National Pictures starring Colleen Moore and featuring Neil Hamilton. The film has no audible dialogue, but it is accompanied by a Vitaphone soundtrack with music, sound effects, and some synchronized singing.

<i>The Terror</i> (1928 film) 1928 film by Roy Del Ruth

The Terror is a 1928 early American, pre-Code, horror film written by Harvey Gates and directed by Roy Del Ruth, based on the 1927 play of the same name by Edgar Wallace. It was the second "all-talking" motion picture released by Warner Bros.. The film was also the first all-talking horror film, made using the Vitaphone sound-on-disc system.

<i>Synthetic Sin</i> 1929 silent film directed by William A. Seiter

Synthetic Sin is a 1929 American comedy film directed by William A. Seiter, based on a play of the same name. While filmed as a silent, it was released by Warner Bros. accompanied with a Vitaphone music soundtrack and sound effects. However most of the Vitaphone discs are still lost, apart from the final reel.

<i>Tracked by the Police</i> 1927 film by Ray Enright

Tracked by the Police is a 1927 silent film produced and distributed by the Warner Bros. with a story written by Darryl Zanuck. It stars dog actor Rin Tin Tin. Ray Enright directed with 'Rinty's' costars being Jason Robards, Sr. and Virginia Brown Faire. The film may have had a Vitaphone sound effects/music track that is now lost. The film is preserved at the Library of Congress.

The Greyhound Limited is 1929 part-talkie crime drama and railroad theme film directed by Howard Bretherton and starring Monte Blue. Warner Bros. produced and distributed releasing the film in the Vitaphone process, with a music score and sound effects. The film is a follow up to the 1927 film The Black Diamond Express.

<i>Skin Deep</i> (1929 film) 1929 film by Ray Enright

Skin Deep is a 1929 American pre-Code drama film directed by Ray Enright and starring Monte Blue. It was produced and distributed by the Warner Brothers. It was also released in the U.S. in a silent version for theaters not equipped yet with sound. The film is a remake of a 1922 Associated First National silent film of the same name directed by Lambert Hillyer and starring Milton Sills.

References

  1. Staff (March 11, 1928) Actor Life Reads Like Alger Tale: Deno, Featured Dancer at Hillstreet, Italian Immigrant Years Ago" Los Angeles Times p.C28
  2. My Man at the American Film Institute Catalog
  3. 1 2 3 Warner Bros financial information in The William Shaefer Ledger. See Appendix 1, Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, (1995) 15:sup1, 1-31 p 7 DOI: 10.1080/01439689508604551
  4. 1 2 Progressive Silent Film List: My Man at silentera.com
  5. "My Man" silentera.com