Sex Hygiene

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Sex Hygiene
Sex Hygiene.jpg
Robert Lowery and George Reeves in United States War Department Official Training Film No. 8-154
Directed by Otto Brower (medical footage)
John Ford (dramatic sequences)
Produced by Darryl F. Zanuck
Written byW. Ulman
Starring George Reeves
Richard Derr
CinematographyGeorge Barnes
Charles G. Clarke
Edited by Gene Fowler, Jr.
Distributed by U.S. Army Signal Corps
Release date
  • February 1942 (1942-02)
Running time
30 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

Sex Hygiene is a short 1942 American drama film directed by John Ford [1] and Otto Brower. It belonged to the instructional social guidance film genre, which offered adolescent and adult behavioural advice, medical information, and moral exhortations. The Academy Film Archive preserved Sex Hygiene in 2007. [2]

Contents

Plot

Several servicemen relax by playing pool at their base. One later visits a prostitute and contracts syphilis. As a result of his unfortunate experience, there is an opportunity for sexual health information about syphilis, how it is spread and how its spread can be prevented.

Cast

See also

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References

  1. Turnour, Quentin. "John Ford: Other Directions". sensesofcinema.com. Retrieved September 19, 2011.
  2. "Preserved Projects". Academy Film Archive.