The Great American Broadcast

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The Great American Broadcast
Great American Broadcast 1941.jpg
Alice Faye, John Payne and Jack Oakie
Directed by Archie Mayo
Produced by Darryl F. Zanuck
Written by Don Ettlinger
Erwin Blum
Robert Ellis
Helen Logan
Samuel Hoffenstein
Starring Alice Faye
John Payne
Jack Oakie
Music by Cyril J. Mockridge
Cinematography J. Peverell Marley
Leon Shamroy
Edited by Robert L. Simpson
Distributed by 20th Century Fox
Release date
May 9, 1941
Running time
90 min.
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

The Great American Broadcast is a 1941 comedy film directed by Archie Mayo. It stars Jack Oakie, Alice Faye and John Payne. [1]

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Cast

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