Thanks a Million

Last updated
Thanks a Million
Thanks a Million.jpg
theatrical poster
Directed by Roy Del Ruth
Produced by Darryl F. Zanuck
Written by Nunnally Johnson
Story:
Darryl F. Zanuck
Melville Crossman
Uncredited:
Fred Allen
James Gow
Edmund Gross
Harry Tugend
Starring Dick Powell
Ann Dvorak
Fred Allen
Music by Arthur Lange
Cinematography J. Peverell Marley
Edited byAllen McNeil
Production
company
Distributed by 20th Century Fox
Release date
  • October 25, 1935 (1935-10-25)
Running time
87 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

Thanks a Million is a 1935 musical film produced and released by 20th Century Fox and directed by Roy Del Ruth. It stars Dick Powell, Ann Dvorak and Fred Allen, and features Patsy Kelly, David Rubinoff and Paul Whiteman and his band with singer/pianist Ramona. The script by Nunnally Johnson was based on a story by producer Darryl F. Zanuck (writing as Melville Crossman) and contained uncredited additional dialogue by Fred Allen, James Gow, Edmund Gross and Harry Tugend.

Contents

Thanks a Million was nominated for the Academy Award for Sound (E. H. Hansen) in 1935. [1] It was remade in 1946 as If I'm Lucky , with Perry Como and Phil Silvers in the Powell and Allen roles. [2]

Plot

Stranded in a small town in a downpour, the manager of a traveling musical show (Fred Allen) convinces the handlers of a boring long-winded local judge running for governor (Raymond Walburn) to hire his group to attract people to the politician's rallies. When the show's crooner, Eric Land (Dick Powell), upstages the judge, he's fired, but on a return visit he saves the day by standing in for the judge, who is too drunk to speak.

Impressed by his poise, the party's bosses ask Eric to take over as candidate. The singer, knowing he has no chance to win, agrees for the exposure and the radio airtime in which he can showcase his singing. Soon, though, his girlfriend Sally (Ann Dvorak) becomes annoyed at the amount of time Eric is spending with the wife of one of the bosses, and she leaves when she thinks he has lied to her.

When the bosses ask Eric to agree to patronage appointments that will lead to easy graft for all of them, he exposes them on the radio, telling the voters that voting for him would be a huge mistake and urging them to vote for his opponent. At the end Eric is, of course, elected governor, then reunited with Sally.

Cast

Songs

Related Research Articles

<i>Yankee Doodle Dandy</i> 1942 film by Michael Curtiz

Yankee Doodle Dandy is a 1942 American biographical musical film about George M. Cohan, known as "The Man Who Owned Broadway". It stars James Cagney, Joan Leslie, Walter Huston, and Richard Whorf, and features Irene Manning, George Tobias, Rosemary DeCamp, Jeanne Cagney, and Vera Lewis. Joan Leslie's singing voice was partially dubbed by Sally Sweetland.

Paul Whiteman American jazz musician and radio personality

Paul Samuel 'Pops' Whiteman was an American bandleader, composer, orchestral director, and violist.

The cinema releases of 1935 were highly representative of the early Golden Age period of Hollywood. This period was punctuated by performances from Clark Gable, Shirley Temple, Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, and the first teaming of Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy. A significant number of productions also originated in the UK film industry. It was also a period notable in Soviet Russia for the increasing amount of state control exercised over their film industry.

<i>Murder, My Sweet</i> 1944 film directed by Edward Dmytryk

Murder, My Sweet is a 1944 American film noir, directed by Edward Dmytryk and starring Dick Powell, Claire Trevor and Anne Shirley. The film is based on Raymond Chandler's 1940 novel Farewell, My Lovely. It was the first film to feature Chandler's primary character, the hard-boiled private detective Philip Marlowe.

<i>Broadway Melody of 1938</i> 1937 film by Roy Del Ruth

Broadway Melody of 1938 is a 1937 American musical film produced by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and directed by Roy Del Ruth. The film is essentially a backstage musical revue, featuring high-budget sets and cinematography in the MGM musical tradition. The film stars Eleanor Powell and Robert Taylor and features Buddy Ebsen, George Murphy, Judy Garland, Sophie Tucker, Raymond Walburn, Robert Benchley and Binnie Barnes.

<i>George Whites Scandals</i> String of Broadway revues

George White's Scandals were a long-running string of Broadway revues produced by George White that ran from 1919–1939, modeled after the Ziegfeld Follies. The "Scandals" launched the careers of many entertainers, including W. C. Fields, the Three Stooges, Ray Bolger, Helen Morgan, Ethel Merman, Ann Miller, Eleanor Powell, Bert Lahr and Rudy Vallée. Louise Brooks, Dolores Costello, Barbara Pepper, and Alice Faye got their show business start as lavishly dressed chorus girls strutting to the "Scandal Walk." Much of George Gershwin's early work appeared in the 1920–24 editions of Scandals. The Black Bottom, danced by Ziegfeld Follies star Ann Pennington and Tom Patricola, touched off a national dance craze.

<i>Born to Dance</i> 1936 film by Roy Del Ruth

Born to Dance is an American musical film starring Eleanor Powell and James Stewart, directed by Roy Del Ruth and released in 1936 by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. The score was composed by Cole Porter.

<i>Honolulu</i> (film) 1939 film by Edward Buzzell

Honolulu is an American musical film that was released by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer in 1939. The film stars dancer Eleanor Powell and Robert Young, and was directed by Edward Buzzell. Also appearing in the film are George Burns, Gracie Allen, Eddie "Rochester" Anderson, and Rita Johnson.

<i>The Mayor of Hell</i> 1933 film

The Mayor of Hell is a 1933 American pre-Code Warner Brothers film starring James Cagney. The film was remade in 1938 as Crime School with Humphrey Bogart taking over James Cagney's role and Hell's Kitchen with Ronald Reagan in 1939.

<i>Varsity Show</i> (film) 1937 film by William Keighley

Varsity Show is a 1937 American musical film directed by William Keighley from a script by Jerry Wald, Richard Macaulay, Warren Duff and Sig Herzig and starring Dick Powell, Fred Waring and Waring's Pennsylvanians, Ted Healy, and Priscilla Lane. Released by Warner Bros., it features songs by Richard A. Whiting and many others. The finale was directed by Busby Berkeley.

Raymond Walburn

Raymond Walburn was an American character actor of stage and screen who appeared in dozens of Hollywood movie comedies and an occasional dramatic role during the 1930s and 1940s.

<i>Pigskin Parade</i> 1936 film by David Butler

Pigskin Parade is a 1936 American musical comedy film which tells the story of husband-and-wife college football coaches who convince a backwoods player to play for their team so they can go to the big game. It was written by William M. Conselman, Mary Kelly, Nat Perrin, Arthur Sheekman, Harry Tugend and Jack Yellen, and was directed by David Butler.

<i>Christmas in July</i> (film) 1940 film by Preston Sturges

Christmas in July is a 1940 comedy film written and directed by Preston Sturges based on his 1931 play A Cup of Coffee. It was Sturges' second film as writer-director, after The Great McGinty, and stars Dick Powell and Ellen Drew.

<i>Were Not Married!</i> 1952 film by Edmund Goulding

We're Not Married! is a 1952 American anthology romantic comedy film directed by Edmund Goulding. It was released by 20th Century Fox.

Paul Harvey (actor) American actor

Paul Harvey was a prolific American character actor who appeared in at least 177 films. He is not to be confused with Paul Harvey the broadcaster.

<i>Lady by Choice</i> 1934 film by David Burton

Lady by Choice is a 1934 American romantic drama film released by Columbia Pictures starring Carole Lombard as a fan dancer and May Robson as a homeless drunk who is asked to pose as the dancer's mother for a publicity stunt, with unexpected consequences. Promoted as a follow-up to Frank Capra's 1933 hit Lady for a Day (1933), it resembles the earlier film only in its choice of leading lady, May Robson.

<i>Key to the City</i> (film) 1950 film by George Sidney

Key to the City is a 1950 American romantic comedy film starring Clark Gable and Loretta Young as mayors who meet in San Francisco and despite their contrasting personalities and views, fall in love. It marked the final film role of Frank Morgan and Clara Blandick.

Brief Moment is a 1933 American pre-Code drama film directed by David Burton and starring Carole Lombard and Gene Raymond. It is based on the 1931 play of the same name by S. N. Behrman.

<i>Naughty but Nice</i> (1939 film) 1939 film by Ray Enright

Naughty but Nice is a 1939 Warner Bros. musical comedy film directed by Ray Enright, starring Dick Powell and Ann Sheridan and featuring Gale Page, Ronald Reagan, and Helen Broderick, with Allen Jenkins, ZaSu Pitts, and Maxie Rosenbloom in supporting roles. The original story and screenplay were written by Richard Macaulay and Jerry Wald, and the film includes songs with music by Harry Warren and lyrics by Johnny Mercer, as well as music adapted from Bach, Beethoven, Liszt, Mozart, Robert Schumann, and Wagner. Ann Sheridan did her own singing in the film, except for song "In a Moment of Weakness", in which she was dubbed by Vera Van.

<i>Smartest Girl in Town</i> 1936 film by Joseph Santley

Smartest Girl in Town is a 1936 American comedy film directed by Joseph Santley, written by Viola Brothers Shore, and starring Gene Raymond, Ann Sothern, Helen Broderick, Eric Blore, Erik Rhodes and Harry Jans. It was released on November 27, 1936, by RKO Pictures.

References

  1. "The 8th Academy Awards (1936) Nominees and Winners". oscars.org. Retrieved 2011-08-07.
  2. Thanks a Million at AllMovie