Three Mounted Men

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Three Mounted Men
Silent film actor Harry Carey (SAYRE 18734).jpg
Carey in the film
Directed by Jack Ford
Screenplay byEugene B. Lewis
Story byEugene B. Lewis
Starring Harry Carey
CinematographyJohn W. Brown
Ben F. Reynolds
Distributed by Universal Film Manufacturing Company
Release date
  • October 7, 1918 (1918-10-07)
Running time
60 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageSilent (English intertitles)

Three Mounted Men is a 1918 American Western film directed by John Ford (credited as Jack Ford) and featuring Harry Carey. The film is considered to be lost. [1]

Contents

Plot

As described in a film magazine, [2] Cheyenne Harry (Carey) is promised his liberty from prison if he will capture "dead or alive" Buck Masters (Harris), a worthless and desperate character. Harry agrees, and in short order he has won the confidence of the bad man and they agree to hold up the night stage coach. Harry tips off the sheriff and the tough is caught. Harry then finds that this has robbed a poor girl, Lola (Gerber), and her mother (Lafayette) of their only support. Harry relents and, with his two pals, they kidnap the thief from the sheriff's automobile and make off with him. Harry rides off to begin life anew with Lola, the desperado's sister.

Cast

Reception

Like many American films of the time, Three Mounted Men was subject to cuts by city and state film censorship boards. For example, the Chicago Board of Censors required a cut, in Reel 1, of the last choking scene, Reel 2, the second part of the letter beginning with "If you try to get me" etc., Reel 4, one scene of a young woman at the bar, Reel 5, the two intertitles "I am going to prove I am your friend" etc. and "The stage will reach Red Gulch at nine o'clock", and, Reel 6, the first stage holdup scene. [3]

See also

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References

  1. "Progressive Silent Film List: Three Mounted Men". silentera.com. Retrieved February 27, 2008.
  2. "Reviews: Three Mounted Men". Exhibitors Herald. New York City: Exhibitors Herald Company. 7 (15): 34. October 5, 1918.
  3. "Official Cut-Outs by the Chicago Board of Censors". Exhibitors Herald. New York City: Exhibitors Herald Company. 7 (22): 28. November 23, 1918.