The Scrapper

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The Scrapper
The Scrapper 1917 newspaper.jpg
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Directed by John Ford
Produced by Carl Laemmle
Written byJohn Ford
StarringJohn Ford
CinematographyBen F. Reynolds
Distributed by Universal Film Manufacturing Company
Release date
  • June 9, 1917 (1917-06-09)
Running time
2 reels (approximately 25 minutes) [1]
CountryUnited States
Language Silent (English intertitles)

The Scrapper is a 1917 American short Western drama directed by John Ford, who at that time was credited as "Jack Ford". The film is considered to be lost. [2]

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References

  1. According to How Movies Work by Bruce F. Kawin (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1987), a standard 1000-foot theatrical reel of film in the silent era was projected at a speed of 16 frames per second, considerably slower than the 24 frames in the sound era. A full silent reel therefore had an average running time a bit less than 15 minutes.
  2. "Progressive Silent Film List: The Scrapper". Silent Era. Retrieved March 1, 2008.