Daryl Johnston

Last updated

Daryl Johnston
Daryl-Johnston-AA Bowl VIP-OCPA-2006-09-27-144546.jpg
Johnston in September 2006.
Dallas XFL team
Position:Director of Player Personnel
Personal information
Born: (1966-02-10) February 10, 1966 (age 53)
Youngstown, New York
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:242 lb (110 kg)
Career information
High school: Lewiston-Porter (NY)
College: Syracuse
NFL Draft: 1989  / Round: 2 / Pick: 39
Career history
As player:
As executive:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Rushing Yards:753
Average:3.2
Touchdowns:22
Receiving Yards:2,227
Player stats at NFL.com

Daryl Peter "Moose" Johnston (born February 10, 1966) is a former fullback in the National Football League for the Dallas Cowboys. He played college football at Syracuse University. He was the General Manager of the San Antonio Commanders of the Alliance of American Football in 2019, and currently serves as Director of Player Personnel for the Dallas XFL team.

National Football League Professional American football league

The National Football League (NFL) is a professional American football league consisting of 32 teams, divided equally between the National Football Conference (NFC) and the American Football Conference (AFC). The NFL is one of the four major professional sports leagues in North America, and the highest professional level of American football in the world. The NFL's 17-week regular season runs from early September to late December, with each team playing 16 games and having one bye week. Following the conclusion of the regular season, six teams from each conference advance to the playoffs, a single-elimination tournament culminating in the Super Bowl, which is usually held in the first Sunday in February, and is played between the champions of the NFC and AFC.

Dallas Cowboys National Football League franchise in Arlington, Texas

The Dallas Cowboys are a professional American football team based in the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex. The Cowboys compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member club of the league's National Football Conference (NFC) East division. The team is headquartered in Frisco, Texas, and plays its home games at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas, which opened for the 2009 season. The stadium took its current name prior to the 2013 season. The Cowboys joined the NFL as an expansion team in 1960. The team's national following might best be represented by its NFL record of consecutive sell-outs. The Cowboys' streak of 190 consecutive sold-out regular and post-season games began in 2002. The franchise has made it to the Super Bowl eight times, tied with the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Denver Broncos for second most Super Bowl appearances in history, just behind the New England Patriots record eleven Super Bowl appearances. This has also corresponded to eight NFC championships, most in the NFC. The Cowboys have won five of those Super Bowl appearances, tying them with their NFC rivals, the San Francisco 49ers; both are second to Pittsburgh's and New England’s record six Super Bowl championships. The Cowboys are the only NFL team to record 20 straight winning seasons (1966–85), in which they missed the playoffs only twice.

College football collegiate rules version of American/Canadian football, played by student-athletes of American/Canadian colleges and universities

College football is American football played by teams of student athletes fielded by American universities, colleges, and military academies, or Canadian football played by teams of student athletes fielded by Canadian universities. It was through college football play that American football rules first gained popularity in the United States.

Contents

Early years

Johnston was named Western New York Player of the Year in 1983, while playing for Lewiston-Porter High School (locally known as Lew-Port) in Youngstown, New York. The Lancers won the division during his senior year in 1984.

Lewiston-Porter Central School District, colloquially referred to as "Lew-Port", is a school district in the towns of Lewiston, New York and Porter, New York, about 15 miles (24 km) from Niagara Falls, New York.

His Lew-Port jersey (number 34) was retired on September 1, 2006. In 2008, he was inducted into the Greater Buffalo Sports Hall of Fame.

College career

Johnston attended Syracuse University. As a redshirted freshman, he started playing on special teams and would earn the starting fullback position by his sophomore season in 1986.

Syracuse University University located in Syracuse, New York, United States

Syracuse University is a private research university in Syracuse, New York, United States. The institution's roots can be traced to the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary, founded in 1831 by the Methodist Episcopal Church in Lima, New York. After several years of debate over relocating the college to Syracuse, the university was established in 1870, independent of the college. Since 1920, the university has identified itself as nonsectarian, although it maintains a relationship with The United Methodist Church.

Redshirt, in United States college athletics, is a delay or suspension of an athlete's participation to lengthen their period of eligibility. Typically, a student's athletic eligibility in a given sport is four seasons, like the four years of academic classes typically required to earn a bachelor's degree at an American college or university. However, in a redshirt year, student athletes may attend classes at the college or university, practice with an athletic team, and "suit up" for play – but they may compete in only a limited number of games,. Using this mechanism, a student athlete has at most five academic years to use the four years of eligibility, thus becoming what is termed a fifth-year senior.

While playing for Syracuse, Johnston was an All-Big East selection in 1987 and an All-American in 1988. He rushed for 1,830 yards and caught 46 passes during his collegiate career. He once gained 138 yards rushing, the most by a Syracuse running back since Larry Csonka rushed for 154 yards in 1967.

Big East Conference (1979–2013) U.S. college athletic conference, 1979–2013

The Big East Conference was a collegiate athletics conference that consisted of as many as 16 universities in the eastern half of the United States from 1979 to 2013. The conference's members participated in 24 NCAA sports. The conference had a history of success at the national level in basketball throughout its history, while its shorter football program, created by inviting one college and four other "associate members" into the conference, resulted in two national championships.

Running back position in American and Canadian football

A running back (RB) is an American and Canadian football position, a member of the offensive backfield. The primary roles of a running back are to receive handoffs from the quarterback for a rushing play, to catch passes from out of the backfield, and to block. There are usually one or two running backs on the field for a given play, depending on the offensive formation. A running back may be a halfback, a wingback or a fullback. A running back will sometimes be called a "feature back" if he is the team's starting running back.

Larry Csonka American football player

Larry Richard Csonka is a former professional American football fullback and was inducted to both the College Football Hall of Fame and Pro Football Hall of Fame. With the Miami Dolphins he was a member of their perfect season in 1972 and won Super Bowl championships in 1972 and 1973.

He graduated with a degree in economics.

Professional career

Johnston was selected by the Dallas Cowboys in the second round (39th overall) of the 1989 NFL Draft. As a rookie, he received his nickname "Moose" from backup quarterback Babe Laufenberg because of his large stature compared to the rest of the running backs. [1] The name caught on among Dallas fans who would chant "Moooooose" whenever he made a play.

The 1989 NFL draft was the procedure by which National Football League teams selected amateur college football players. It is officially known as the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting. The draft was held April 23–24, 1989, at the Marriott Marquis in New York City, New York. The league also held a supplemental draft after the regular draft and before the regular season.

Babe Laufenberg American football player

Brandon Hugh 'Babe' Laufenberg is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League for the New Orleans Saints, San Diego Chargers, Dallas Cowboys, Washington Redskins, and Kansas City Chiefs. He also was a member of the Ohio Glory in the World League of American Football. He played college football at Indiana University.

As a Cowboy, Johnston played in 149 consecutive games from 1989-1997. He also became one of the greatest special teams players in franchise history.

The 1989 NFL season was the 70th regular season of the National Football League. Before the season, NFL commissioner Pete Rozelle announced his retirement. Paul Tagliabue was eventually chosen to succeed him, taking over on November 5.

The 1997 NFL season was the 78th regular season of the National Football League. The Oilers relocated from Houston, Texas to Nashville, Tennessee. The newly renamed Tennessee Oilers played their home games during this season at the Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium in Memphis, Tennessee while construction of a new stadium in Nashville started. Houston would rejoin the NFL with the expansion Texans in 2002.

He scored 22 career touchdowns and had more receptions than carries. His 294 receptions is the third highest number among Cowboys running backs, totaling 2,227 yards for a 7.6 yards average, compared to 232 carries for 753 yards for a 3.2 yards average. In 1993 Johnston had 50 receptions and averaged 7.4 yards per catch.

Due mainly to Johnston's contributions, the NFL created the fullback position in the Pro Bowl. [2] Prior to this change, blocking fullbacks had little chance of beating out traditional running backs, who had better statistics. In 1993 Johnston became the first fullback ever selected for the Pro Bowl, [1] earning trips in 1993 and in 1994.

Johnston retired at the end of the 1999 season, after suffering a neck injury. He was a member of three Super Bowl winning teams.

NFL statistics

Rushing Stats [3]

YearTeamGamesCarYdsAvgLongTDS1st DownsFumLost
1989 DAL 16672123.2130000
1990 DAL 1610353.581000
1991 DAL 1617543.2100600
1992 DAL 1617613.6140500
1993 DAL 1624743.11131410
1994 DAL 16401383.5921111
1995 DAL 16251114.41821210
1996 DAL 1622482.270500
1997 DAL 6231.530110
1998 DAL 168172.160000
Career1512327533.21885441

Receiving Stats [3]

YearTeamGamesRecsYdsAvgLongTDS1st DownsFumLost
1989 DAL 16161338.3283000
1990 DAL 161414810.6261000
1991 DAL 16282448.72211500
1992 DAL 16322497.81821400
1993 DAL 16503727.42011700
1994 DAL 16443257.42421411
1995 DAL 16302488.32411100
1996 DAL 16432786.5231911
1997 DAL 6181669.2211800
1998 DAL 1618603.391200
1999 DAL 1144.040000
Career1512942,2277.628149022

Legacy

Johnston was considered one of the best fullbacks of his day,[ citation needed ] while blocking for Emmitt Smith, as Smith went on to become the all-time NFL rushing leader. However, Johnston was not the lead blocker for Smith's entire career. A neck injury prematurely ended Johnston's career. Johnston was present the day Smith broke the rushing record; he was in the broadcasting booth, but came down onto the field to hug Smith and congratulate him afterward. As Smith made his victory lap of Texas Stadium after the record setting carry, Johnston hung back in the shadows. When Smith saw Johnston, the two joined together in an emotional embrace, with Smith telling Johnston, "I couldn't have done it without you". Johnston replied, "It was my pleasure. I couldn't imagine doing it for anybody else". [4]

In 2010, Johnston was in the audience for Emmitt Smith's induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. During his acceptance speech, a visibly emotional Smith spoke directly to Johnston, calling out the fact that, as a fullback, he had sacrificed himself for so many years to block for Smith. "Without you", Smith said, "I know that today would not have been possible." [5]

Broadcasting career

In 2003, Johnston joined the program Players Inc Radio when it moved to Fox Sports Radio. The program was sponsored by NFL Players Inc. [6] Since 2013, Johnston has worked as a color commentator alongside Kenny Albert and formerly Dick Stockton Previously, Johnston was on the second broadcast team with Stockton from 2001-06 and Albert from 2007-13. He also worked with Tony "Goose" Siragusa, until Siragusa's firing from the network following the 2015 season. He was an analyst for the NFL Network's "Total Access" until 2012. Johnston also began calling the collegiate Cotton Bowl Classic game for Fox in 2009, first with Pat Summerall, and then eventually Kenny Albert. He also was a guest star of the PBS television series Wishbone in its episode "Moonbone". He appears as a regular guest on First Things First on FS1 (2017/2018) with Cris Carter, Nick Wright and Jenna Wolfe. In 2017, he continues his esteemed broadcasting career with NFL on FOX, teamed with Chris Myers and Laura Okmin.

Executive career

In 2018, Johnston became the General Manager of the San Antonio Commanders of the Alliance of American Football. [7]

On May 15, 2019, he was named Director of Player Personnel for the Dallas XFL team. [8]

Personal life

A native of Youngstown, New York, Johnston now resides in Dallas, Texas with his wife Diane, son Aidan, and daughter Evan.

As a standout tailback on the Lewiston-Porter High School football team, Daryl was named Western New York Player of the Year in 1984; that year, as a senior, his team won their division. Having led his team, Daryl also was among the leaders of the student body, as one of four graduates in his class of 290 students with a perfect 4.0 grade point average. As a redshirted freshman attending Syracuse University, Johnston played on special teams and learned from his early experiences, building a foundation for future success. He earned the starting fullback position his sophomore year, 1986, and before he graduated with a degree in economics in 1989, Johnston was named All-Big East and an All-American, rushed for 1,830 yards and caught 46 passes. His collegiate career over, he entered the 1989 NFL draft and was selected in the second round as the 39th overall pick by the Dallas Cowboys and, rare as it is in professional sports, played his entire 11 year professional football career in Dallas.

Nicknamed “Moose” in his rookie year by former teammate Babe Laufenberg, the 6-2 and 242-pound back earned the starting fullback slot in 1991 and became a fan favorite not only in Dallas but in most playing venues. In his career, he scored 22 touchdowns, rushed for 753 yards and caught 294 passes for more than 2,200 yards – third highest reception total among Cowboy running backs. As a Cowboy, Johnston was a true Iron Man, playing in 149 consecutive games from 1989-97, was selected to two Pro Bowls – the first prototype fullback named to the 1994 squad – and won three Super Bowl rings. Perhaps more than statistics can measure, Johnston was known, and remains regarded, as one of the best power blocking backs in the history of the game and lead blocker for Hall of Fame and all-time NFL rushing leader Emmitt Smith.

Johnston has been a major contributor to many charities including the Special Olympics, Children's Cancer Fund, Cystic Fibrosis and Literacy Instruction For Texas (LIFT). He has also served as honorary chairman for MDA's "Aisles of Smiles" campaign, and for the American Cancer Society's Gunslingers' Ball. In 1999, Johnston's numerous community service activities led to his nomination for the prestigious "Whizzer White Humanitarian Award". He is a recipient of the Ed Block Courage award in 1992, awarded offensive MVP by the Dallas Cowboys in 1995 and received The Tom Landry Legend award in 2009. He was named to the Syracuse Football All Century Team in 2002. He is a member of the 2008 Class of the Greater Buffalo Sports Hall of Fame and honored with the 2016 LetterWinner of Distinction awarded by his alma mater, Syracuse University.

References and notes

  1. 1 2 "Daryl Johnston NFL All-Pro and Fox Sports Net Analyst". MCPSpeakers.com. Retrieved May 29, 2005.
  2. "Top 10 Best Draft Picks of the Jerry Jones Era". Dallas Observer. Retrieved January 20, 2011.
  3. 1 2 "Daryl Johnston Stats". ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved April 14, 2014.
  4. "Daryl Johnston bio" . Retrieved February 19, 2016.
  5. "Emmitt Smith HOF speech" . Retrieved February 19, 2016.
  6. "Closing Bell". Sports Business Daily . July 22, 2010. Retrieved July 29, 2013.
  7. Thomas, Terrence (September 25, 2018). "Commanders ready to call San Antonio home". San Antonio Express-News. Retrieved October 18, 2018.
  8. "Ex-Cowboys FB Daryl Johnston hired as director of player personnel for Dallas' XFL team". The Dallas Morning News . May 15, 2019. Retrieved May 16, 2019.

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