Deanery of Barnstaple

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The Deanery of Barnstaple in north Devon is one of the deaneries of the Archdeaconry of Barnstaple, one of the archdeaconries of the Church of England Diocese of Exeter. The rural dean is Giles King-Smith.

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Benefice of Barnstaple Team Ministry

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Benefice of Braunton (St Brannock) with Saunton (St Anne)

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Benefice of Fremington (St Peter) with Bickington (St Andrew)

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Benefice of Georgeham (St George) with Croyde (St Mary Magdalene)

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Benefice of Heanton Punchardon (St Augustine) with Marwood (St Michael and All Angels), in a mission community with West Down (St Calixtus)

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Benefice of Ilfracombe Team Ministry

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Benefice of Ilfracombe (St Philip and St James)

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