Deanery of Christianity (Exeter)

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The Deanery of Christianity is a deanery in the Archdeaconry of Exeter, Diocese of Exeter. The deanery covers most of the city of Exeter. It takes the name "Christianity" because there is a tradition that a diocese and a deanery should not share the same name.

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Benefice of Alphington (St Michael and All Angels)

Parishes within the mission community:

Clergy:

Benefice of Cathedral (St Peter)

Clergy:

Benefice of Central Exeter (St Stephen, St Mary Arches, St Olave, St Pancras, St Petrock)

Parishes within the benefice:

Clergy:

Benefice of Countess Wear (St Luke)

Clergy:

Benefice of Exeter St David (St David with St Michael and All Angels)

Clergy:

Benefice of Exeter St James (St James)

Clergy:

Benefice of Exeter St Leonard with Holy Trinity (St Leonard and Holy Trinity)

Clergy:

Other staff:

Benefice of Exeter St Mark

Clergy:

Benefice of St Matthew with St Sidwell, Exeter

Clergy:

Benefice of Heavitree and St Mary Steps

Parishes within the benefice:

Clergy:

Benefice of Exeter St Thomas and Emmanuel

Parishes within the benefice:

Clergy:

Benefice of Exwick (St Andrew)

Clergy:

Benefice of Whipton (St Boniface with Holy Trinity)

Clergy:

Exeter Network Church: A Bishop’s Mission Order

Leaders:

Jon Soper Jo Soper

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