Decile

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In descriptive statistics, a decile is any of the nine values that divide the sorted data into ten equal parts, so that each part represents 1/10 of the sample or population. [1] A decile is one possible form of a quantile; others include the quartile and percentile. [2] A decile rank arranges the data in order from lowest to highest and is done on a scale of one to ten where each successive number corresponds to an increase of 10 percentage points.

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References

  1. Lockhart, Robert S. (1998), Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis: For the Behavioral Sciences, Macmillan, p. 78, ISBN   9780716729747 .
  2. Sheskin, David J. (2003), Handbook of Parametric and Nonparametric Statistical Procedures (3rd ed.), CRC Press, p. 10, ISBN   9781420036268 .