Duck (cricket)

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In cricket, a duck is a batsman's dismissal for a score of zero. [1]

Cricket Team sport played with bats and balls

Cricket is a bat-and-ball game played between two teams of eleven players on a field at the centre of which is a 20-metre (22-yard) pitch with a wicket at each end, each comprising two bails balanced on three stumps. The batting side scores runs by striking the ball bowled at the wicket with the bat, while the bowling and fielding side tries to prevent this and dismiss each player. Means of dismissal include being bowled, when the ball hits the stumps and dislodges the bails, and by the fielding side catching the ball after it is hit by the bat, but before it hits the ground. When ten players have been dismissed, the innings ends and the teams swap roles. The game is adjudicated by two umpires, aided by a third umpire and match referee in international matches. They communicate with two off-field scorers who record the match's statistical information.

Dismissal (cricket) out in the game of cricket

In cricket, a dismissal occurs when a batsman's period of batting is brought to an end by the opposing team. It is also known as the batsman being out, the batting side losing a wicket, and the fielding side taking a wicket. The dismissed batsman must leave the field of play permanently for the rest of their team's innings, and is replaced by a teammate. This continues until the end of the innings, which is often when 10 of the 11 team members are dismissed - as players bat in pairs, when only one person is undismissed it is not possible for the team to bat any longer. This is known as bowling out the batting team.

Contents

Origin of the term

The term is a shortening of the term "duck's egg", the latter being used long before Test cricket began. When referring to the Prince of Wales' (the future Edward VII) score of nought on 17 July 1866, a contemporary newspaper wrote that the Prince "retired to the royal pavilion on a 'duck's egg' ". [2] The name is believed to come from the shape of the number "0" being similar to that of a duck's egg, as in the case of the American slang term "goose-egg" popular in baseball and the tennis term "love," derived - according to one theory - from French l'oeuf ("the egg"). The Concise Oxford Dictionary still cites "duck's egg" as an alternative version of the term. [3]

Edward VII King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions and Emperor of India 1901-1910

Edward VII was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death in 1910.

Duck common name for many species in the bird family Anatidae

Duck is the common name for a large number of species in the waterfowl family Anatidae which also includes swans and geese. Ducks are divided among several subfamilies in the family Anatidae; they do not represent a monophyletic group but a form taxon, since swans and geese are not considered ducks. Ducks are mostly aquatic birds, mostly smaller than the swans and geese, and may be found in both fresh water and sea water.

American English Set of dialects of the English language spoken in the United States

American English, sometimes called United States English or U.S. English, is the set of varieties of the English language native to the United States. It is considered one of the most influential dialects of English globally, including on other varieties of English.

Significant ducks

The first duck in a Test match was made in the very first Test, between Australia and England at Melbourne in March 1877, when Ned Gregory was caught by Andrew Greenwood off the bowling of James Lillywhite. [4] As of 2017, the record for the most ducks in Test cricket is held by West Indies player Courtney Walsh, who was out for nought on 43 occasions, [5] while the overall first-class record is 156, set by Worcestershire and England player Reg Perks. [6]

Test cricket the longest form of the sport of cricket; so called due to its long, grueling nature

Test cricket is the form of the sport of cricket with the longest duration, and is considered the game's highest standard. Test matches are played between national representative teams with "Test status", as determined and conferred by the International Cricket Council (ICC). The term Test stems from the fact of the form's long, gruelling matches being both mentally and physically testing. Two teams of 11 players each play a four-innings match, which may last up to five days. It is generally considered the most complete examination of a team's endurance and ability.

England cricket team Sports team

The England cricket team represents England and Wales in international cricket. Since 1997 it has been governed by the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB), having been previously governed by Marylebone Cricket Club from 1903 until the end of 1996. England, as a founding nation, is a full member of the International Cricket Council (ICC) with Test, One Day International (ODI) and Twenty20 International (T20I) status. Until the 1990s, Scottish and Irish players also played for England as those countries were not yet ICC members in their own right.

Melbourne Cricket Ground stadium in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

The Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG), also known simply as "The G", is an Australian sports stadium located in Yarra Park, Melbourne, Victoria. Home to the Melbourne Cricket Club, it is the 10th largest stadium in the world, the largest in Australia, the largest in the Southern Hemisphere, the largest cricket ground by capacity, and has the tallest light towers of any sporting venue. The MCG is within walking distance of the city centre and is served by Richmond and Jolimont stations, as well as the route 70 tram and the route 246 bus. It is part of the Melbourne Sports and Entertainment Precinct.

One particularly high-profile example of a duck came in 1948, when Don Bradman was playing his final Test match for Australia, against England at The Oval. In Australia's first innings, Bradman was bowled for a duck by Eric Hollies, causing his Test average to fall from 101.39 to 99.94; had he scored just four runs, his average would have been 100. As things turned out, Australia won the match by an innings, and so Bradman did not get to bat a second time (had he batted, he would have needed at least 104 runs if dismissed or at least four runs if not out to get his average back to 100). [7]

Don Bradman Australian cricketer

Sir Donald George Bradman, AC, often referred to as "The Don", was an Australian international cricketer, widely acknowledged as the greatest batsman of all time. Bradman's career Test batting average of 99.94 has been cited as the greatest achievement by any sportsman in any major sport.

The Oval cricket ground in Kennington, South London

The Oval, currently referred to for sponsorship purposes as the Kia Oval, is an international cricket ground in Kennington, in the London Borough of Lambeth, in south London. The Oval has been the home ground of Surrey County Cricket Club since it was opened in 1845. It was the first ground in England to host international Test cricket in September 1880. The final Test match of the English season is traditionally played there.

Bowled

In cricket, the term bowled has several meanings. First, is the act of propelling the ball towards the wicket defended by a batsman.

In the first Test of Australia's tour of India in 1986, with the cumulative scores tied, Indian tailender Maninder Singh was trapped LBW by Greg Matthews for a four ball duck, ensuring just the second tied Test in Test Cricket history.

Maninder Singhpronunciation  is a former international cricket player who represented India in 35 Test matches and 59 One Day Internationals. Singh holds the Test record for the most tests in a complete career without aggregating 100 runs. With his slow left-arm orthodox spin, Maninder was considered as an heir to Bishan Singh Bedi, who then held the record as India's leading spinner in terms of wickets. Maninder Singh has the most phenomenal bowling records in international cricket and retired prematurely due to personal reasons.

Gregory Richard John "Mo" Matthews is a former New South Wales and Australian cricket all rounder who is now a television cricket commentator.

A tied Test is a Test cricket match in which the side batting second is bowled out in the second innings, with scores level. This is a very rare result; only two ties have occurred in the 2,000 Tests played since 1877. The first was in 1960 and the second in 1986. On both occasions, the aggregate scores of both sides (teams) were equal at the conclusion of play and the side batting last had completed its final innings: 10 batsmen had been dismissed or, from the perspective of the side bowling, 10 wickets had been taken. In other words after four completed innings, with each innings ending either by a declaration or 10 wickets having fallen, the runs for both teams were exactly the same.

Indian all-rounder Ajit Agarkar earned the unfortunate nickname "Bombay Duck" after being dismissed for ducks five consecutive times in test matches against Australia. [8] [9]

All-rounder Cricket format

An all-rounder is a cricketer who regularly performs well at both batting and bowling. Although all bowlers must bat and quite a few batsmen do bowl occasionally, most players are skilled in only one of the two disciplines and are considered specialists. Some wicket-keepers have the skills of a specialist batsman and have been referred to as all-rounders, but the term wicketkeeper-batsman is more commonly applied to them, even if they are substitute wicketkeepers who also bowl.

Ajit Agarkar former Indian Cricketer

Ajit Agarkarpronunciation  is a former Indian cricketer, who had represented India in more than 200 international matches in all three formats of the game. He is the third highest wicket-taker for India in ODIs and has represented India in the 1999 Cricket World Cup, 2007 Cricket World Cup but didn't feature in any of the world cup matches in the 2003 Cricket World Cup where India reached into the finals.

In a 1913 match against Glastonbury, Huish and Langport's batsmen all scored ducks for a total of zero runs. [10] A similar occurrence in indoor cricket happened in 2016, when Bapchild Cricket Club were dismissed for zero against Christ Church University. [11]

On January 30, 2017 tailender Josh Hazlewood (Aus) became the first player to be dismissed for a diamond duck in a partnership of more than fifty runs. He was run out at the non-striker's end without facing a delivery.

On 22 April 2019, Ashton Turner, playing for the Rajasthan Royals against the Delhi Capitals in the 2019 Indian Premier League tournament, was dismissed without scoring. He became the first batsman to make five consecutive ducks in Twenty20 cricket. [12]

Variations

There are several variations used to describe specific types of duck. The usage or prevalence of many of these terms vary regionally, with one term having different meanings in different parts of the world. Even within commentary from ESPN Cricinfo or individual cricket board websites, there is no uniform application of some of these terms.

Pair

To be dismissed for nought in both innings of the same two-innings match is to be dismissed for a pair, [20] because the two noughts together are thought to resemble a pair of spectacles; the longer form is occasionally used. [21] To be dismissed first ball in both innings (i.e., two golden ducks) is to suffer the indignity of making a king pair . [13]

Most duck by a batsmen in his career(top ten)

PlayerSpanMatInnsNORunsHSAveBFSR1005004s6s
M Muralitharan (Asia/ICC/SL)1992-20114953281191936679.26266872.56015919641
CA Walsh (WI)1984-200133726494125730*7.39253949.500054100+28+
ST Jayasuriya (Asia/SL)1989-2011586651352103234034.1425849+81.13*42103532486352
GD McGrath (AUS/ICC)1993-200737620789761616.44181841.850149581
DPMD Jayawardene (Asia/SL)1997-2015652725622595737439.154010064.7354136472679170
DL Vettori (ICC/NZ)1997-201544238386698914023.531069265.366274674534
Wasim Akram (PAK)1984-2003460427746615257*18.739597+68.39*31345571+178+
Z Khan (Asia/INDIA)2000-20143092326120367511.90346958.69034421053
SK Warne (AUS/ICC)1992-20073393064641729916.04688360.610134441350

See also

Related Research Articles

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Glossary of cricket terms Wikimedia list article

This is a general glossary of the terminology used in the sport of cricket. Where words in a sentence are also defined elsewhere in this article, they appear in italics. Certain aspects of cricket terminology are explained in more detail in cricket statistics and the naming of fielding positions is explained at fielding (cricket).

Partnership (cricket)

In the sport of cricket, two batsmen always bat in partnership, although only one is a striker at any time. The partnership between two batsmen will come to an end when one of them is dismissed or retires, or the innings comes to a close. Various statistics may be used to describe a partnership, most notably the number of runs scored during it, the duration of the partnership both in time and number of deliveries (balls) faced. Partnerships are often described as being for a particular wicket. This has the anomalous result that a partnership may be between more than two batsmen, if one of the original batsmen retires hurt but not out, since the particular numbered wicket will not have fallen yet.

Australian cricket team in England in 1948

The Australian cricket team in England in 1948 was captained by Don Bradman, who was making his fourth and final tour of England. The team is famous for being the first Test match side to play an entire tour of England without losing a match. This feat earned them the nickname of The Invincibles, and they are regarded as one of the greatest cricket teams of all time. According to the Australian federal government the team "is one of Australia's most cherished sporting legends".

In cricket, the batting order is the sequence in which batsmen play through their team's innings, there always being two batsmen taking part at any one time. All eleven players in a team are required to bat if the innings is completed.

The India national cricket team toured Australia in the 1947–48 season to play a five-match Test series against Australia. Australia won the series 4–0, with one match drawn.

The name originates from the two noughts together being thought to resemble a pair of spectacles; the longer form is occasionally used.

1948 Ashes series

The 1948 Ashes series was that year's edition of the long-standing cricket rivalry between England and Australia. Starting on 10 June 1948, England and Australia played five Tests. Australia had not lost a Test since the Second World War and were strong favourites. Their captain Don Bradman had publicly expressed his ambition of going through the tour without defeat, and Australia won 10 of their 12 lead-up matches, eight by an innings. The England team, however, had several notable players themselves, including Len Hutton, Denis Compton and Alec Bedser. Nevertheless, the final result was a 4–0 series win for Australia, with the Third Test being drawn. They thus retained The Ashes. The Australians remained undefeated for their entire tour of England, earning them the sobriquet of The Invincibles.

Keith Miller with the Australian cricket team in England in 1948 Australian cricketers role in a pivotal test match series in 1948

Keith Miller was a member of Donald Bradman's famous Australian cricket team, which toured England in 1948 and went undefeated in its 34 matches. This unprecedented feat by a Test side touring England earned the Australians the sobriquet "The Invincibles". Miller was an all-rounder: a right-arm opening fast bowler and a right-handed middle-order batsman. With Ray Lindwall, he formed Australia's first-choice opening attack, a combination regarded as one of the best of all time. Miller was also a skillful slip fielder, regarded by his captain as the best in the world.

Fifth Test, 1948 Ashes series

The Fifth Test of the 1948 Ashes series, held at The Oval in London, was the final Test in that cricket series between Australia and England. The match took place on 14–18 August, with a rest day on 15 August. Australia won the match by an innings and 149 runs to complete a 4–0 series win. It was the last Test in the career of Australian captain Donald Bradman, generally regarded as the best batsman in the history of the sport. Going into the match, if Australia batted only once, Bradman needed only four runs from his final innings to have a Test batting average of exactly 100, but he failed to score, bowled second ball for a duck by leg spinner Eric Hollies.

Ray Lindwall was a key member of Donald Bradman's famous Australian cricket team, which toured England in 1948. The Australians went undefeated in their 34 matches; this unprecedented feat by a Test side touring England earned them the sobriquet The Invincibles.

Ernie Toshack with the Australian cricket team in England in 1948 Australian cricketers role in a pivotal test match series in 1948

Ernie Toshack was a member of Donald Bradman's famous Australian cricket team, which toured England in 1948 and was undefeated in their 34 matches. This unprecedented feat by a Test side touring England earned Bradman's men the sobriquet The Invincibles.

Ron Hamence with the Australian cricket team in England in 1948 Australian cricketer

Ron Hamence was a member of Donald Bradman's famous Australian cricket team of 1948, which toured England and was undefeated in its 34 matches. As a result of this unprecedented feat by a Test side touring England, the team earned the nickname The Invincibles.

Fourth Test, 1948 Ashes series

The Fourth Test of the 1948 Ashes series was one of five Tests in a cricket series between Australia and England. The match was played at Headingley Stadium at Leeds from 22 to 27 July with a rest day on 25 July. Australia won the match by seven wickets to take an unassailable 3–0 series lead. In successfully chasing a target of 404, they set a new world record for the highest victorious runchase in Test history.

The Second Test of the 1948 Ashes series was one of five Tests in a cricket series between Australia and England. The match was played at Lord's in London from 24 to 29 June, with a rest day on 27 June. Australia won the match by 409 runs to take a 2–0 lead, meaning that England would need to win the remaining three matches to regain The Ashes.

First Test, 1948 Ashes series

The First Test of the 1948 Ashes series was one of five Tests in a cricket series between Australia and England. The match was played at Trent Bridge in Nottingham from 10 to 15 June with a rest day on 13 June. Australia won the match by eight wickets to take a 1–0 series lead.

Lindsay Hassett was the vice-captain and one of three on-tour selectors for Don Bradman's famous Australian cricket team, which toured England in 1948. The Australians went undefeated in their 34 matches; this unprecedented feat by a Test side touring England earned them the sobriquet The Invincibles, and resulted in them being regarded as one of the greatest teams of all time. A right-handed batsman, Hassett played in all five Tests; he was a middle-order batsman in all but the Fourth Test, when he stood in as an opener due to an injury to Sid Barnes.

Sid Barnes with the Australian cricket team in England in 1948 Australian cricketer

Sid Barnes was a key member of Donald Bradman's famous Australian cricket team, which toured England in 1948. The team went undefeated in their 34 matches; this unprecedented feat by a Test side touring England earned them the sobriquet The Invincibles. A right-handed opening batsman, Barnes was part of Bradman's first-choice team and played in four of the five Tests—he missed one match due to injury—partnering the left-handed Arthur Morris.

Sam Loxton with the Australian cricket team in England in 1948 cricketer

Sam Loxton was a member of Donald Bradman's famous Australian cricket team, which toured England in 1948. Bradman’s men went undefeated in their 34 matches; this unprecedented feat by a Test side touring England earned them the sobriquet The Invincibles.

References

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  6. "Most Ducks in First-Class Cricket". CricketArchive. Retrieved 22 May 2007.
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  11. "Cricket team bowled out for zero in Kent indoor game". BBC Sport. 11 February 2016. Retrieved 13 February 2016.
  12. "Ashton Turner in record fifth successive T20 duck - four of them first ball". BBC Sport. Retrieved 22 April 2019.
  13. 1 2 "Cricket explained". Cricinfo . Retrieved 22 May 2007.
  14. 1 2 Victorian Cricket Association Umpires and Scorers Association Association Newsletter, Vol. 15 No. 5, 2008–2009 season, p11
  15. "cricket.com.au Twenty20 Match Commentary". Archived from the original on 20 January 2009. Retrieved 17 January 2009.
  16. Samuel, Martin (4 December 2010). "A diamond duck? Simon Katich's howler was as rare as a sighting of Quackula..." Daily Mail. London.
  17. "Diamond duck places Katich in select Ashes club". The Sydney Morning Herald. 4 December 2010.
  18. All Today's Yesterdays – South Africa's first home Test for 22 years
  19. Sailesh S. Radha, Five Days in White Flannels: A Trivia Book on Test Cricket, p46, (AuthorHouse) ISBN   1-4389-2469-0
  20. "Middlesex facing innings defeat at Lord's". Middlesex County Cricket Club. 22 June 2006. Archived from the original on 5 February 2012. Retrieved 8 September 2013.
  21. Blofeld, Henry (18 August 2003). "CRICKET: Smith has the class and character to revive England". The Independent . FindArticles. Archived from the original on 8 September 2013. Retrieved 8 September 2013. Conversely, Graham Gooch made a pair of spectacles in his first Test, against Australia.